School Counseling Curriculum

School Counseling Program of Study | Bilingual School Counseling Program of Study

 Counseling Labs |  Internships |  Terminal Experience |  Electives | Student Learning Outcomes

 PROGRAM IN COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE: SCHOOLS, Pre-K-12 (CNGU/CGS)
Course # Course Title Credits
Foundational Courses (21 Points)
APSY-GE 2650 Professional Orient. & Ethical Issues in School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2662 Foundations of School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2657 Individual Counseling: Theory and Process 3.0
APSY-GE 2658 Individual Counseling: Practice I 3.0
APSY-GE 2070 Research & Evaluation in Behavioral Sciences 3.0
APSY-GE 2648 Practicum in School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2682 Cross-Cultural Counseling 3.0
Intermediate Courses (9 Points)
APSY-GE 2138 Human Growth and Development 3.0
APSY-GE 2620 Group Dynamics: Theory and Practice 3.0
APSY-GE 2635 Career Counseling 3.0
Advanced Courses (12 Points)
APSY-GE 2663 Program Development and Evaluation 3.0
APSY-GE 2673 Assessment of Children and Adolescents 3.0
APSY-GE 2667 Internship in School Counseling I 3.0
APSY-GE 2668 Internship in School Counseling II 3.0
Other Requirements (6 Points)
  Special Population Course (See Course Offerings Below) 3.0
  Applied Content Course (See Course Offerings Below) 3.0
TCHL-GE 2999 Drug, Alcohol Education/School Violence Prevention/Child Abuse Recognition 0.0
  CPC Exam 0.0
Total Credits:   48.0

 PROGRAM IN COUNSELING & GUIDANCE: BILINGUAL SCHOOLS, K-12 (CNGU/CGB)
Course # Course Title Credits
Foundational Courses (21 Points)
APSY-GE 2650 Professional Orient. & Ethical Issues in School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2662 Foundations of School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2657 Individual Counseling: Theory and Process 3.0
APSY-GE 2658 Individual Counseling: Practice I 3.0
APSY-GE 2070 Research & Evaluation in Behavioral Sciences 3.0
APSY-GE 2648 Practicum in School Counseling 3.0
APSY-GE 2682 Cross-Cultural Counseling 3.0
Intermediate Courses (9 Points)
APSY-GE 2138 Human Growth and Development 3.0
APSY-GE 2620 Group Dynamics: Theory and Practice 3.0
APSY-GE 2635 Career Counseling 3.0
Advanced Courses (12 Points)
APSY-GE 2663 Program Development and Evaluation 3.0
APSY-GE 2673 Assessment of Children and Adolescents 3.0
APSY-GE 2667 Internship in School Counseling I 3.0
APSY-GE 2668 Internship in School Counseling II 3.0
Other Requirements (6 Points)
BILED-GE 2001 Bilingual Multicultural Educ: Theory/Practice 3.0
BILED-GE 2103 The Bilingual Exceptional Child 3.0
TCHL-GE 2999 Drug, Alcohol Education/School Violence Prevention/Child Abuse Recognition 0.0
  CPC Exam 0.0
Total Credits:   48.0

Counseling Labs

The Counseling Lab (APSY-GE 2658 Individual Counseling Practice I) is designed to present students with an opportunity for experiential learning and practice in communication skills and counseling process. Based on a training program called Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR), the classes involve the use of training DVDs and audiovisual recording of counseling sessions to help students develop self-awareness, personal and professional insight, and basic counseling skills.

Enrollment is open to matriculated NYU graduate students in the following departments: Applied Psychology and Drama Therapy (spring only).

Be advised that Lab I is a prerequisite for Practicum. Lab I and Practicum are prerequisites for Internship I and Internship II.

Grading for the course is Pass/Fail. Students who miss more than two classes are given an incomplete or failing grade, depending upon circumstances. Those students in Lab I who have not acquired the necessary insight or skill level required for advancement to Practicum will be required to repeat Lab I.

Counseling Lab I Competencies

  • Mastery of the four basic skill sets introduced in the IPR tapes.
  • Understanding of and ability to engage in the IPR approach, i.e. client recall, counselor recall, mutual recall and the inquirer role.
  • Full participation in all lab activities is demonstrated by attendance and involvement in simulated counselor/client interactions, ability to examine skills as a counselor and giving feedback to other in their role plays.
  • Demonstrate progress through comparison of three marker tapes: beginning, mid-term, and end of the semester.
  • Evaluate progress at mid-term and end of semester with lab instructor. The evaluation includes all of the above activities, and for counseling students, indicates readiness to go on to Lab II. An Incomplete or Failure grade will be given to students who, in the judgment of the Instructor, have not made adequate progress.

Any counseling student who receives an incomplete or failure grade in Lab I will be subject to review by the Counseling Program Faculty.

 Practicum 

Practicum Competencies

  • Ability to utilize the basic skills acquired in Lab I in a counseling situation.
  • Can conduct a basic counseling intake interview.
  • Understands the basic counseling process and can integrate skills within this process.
  • Can begin to use skills in the context of their understanding of counseling and the specific needs of an individual client
  • Understand the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) national mode
  • Identify student-centered approaches to address a student’s academic achievement, personal, social-emotional, and career developments
  • Identify measurable and attainable student-centered goals
  • Develop and apply cultural competencies in order to work with students from diverse cultural backgrounds
  • Understand the role of the school counselor in a K–12 setting, including ethics and professional issues
  • Apply the three-stage model of counseling (e.g., exploration, insight, and action)

The Internship Sequence

Field learning is considered by many to be the center point of any counselor education program. It is strongly believed that counselors-in-training need the opportunity to combine their didactic learning with experience in a fieldwork setting where they can observe, develop clinical skills and practice the tasks typically associated with a professional counselor.

This clinical component of the program helps the counselor-in-training acquire an understanding of the role of the professional counselor. The student also develops a sense of professional identity and gains proficiency and confidence by applying his or her overall learning and emerging skills under the supervision of experienced, qualified and approved supervisors. Typically students will spend both semesters at the same internship site. In addition to the required hours in the field, students are enrolled in an Internship seminar class. The internship experience is a preparation requirement for certification and /or licensure in all states.

Students in the School Counseling K-12 Program and the Bilingual School Counseling Program are required to complete a minimum of 3 full days or 21 hours per week, in each of two consecutive semesters in a school setting under the direct supervision of a licensed or certified school counselor (this is a state requirement). Bilingual School Counseling students must complete their internship under the supervision of an NY State Certified Bilingual School Counselor.

Non-Credit Course for Drug and Alcohol Education/School Violence Prevention/Identifying and Reporting Child Abuse, TCHL-GE 2999

Students in the School Counseling and Bilingual School Counseling programs must take a workshop on drug and alcohol education, school violence prevention, and child abuse recognition. This single session, non-credit course should be taken concurrently with an internship.

Terminal Experience

The Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) is currently the culminating experience for the MA program. The exam should be taken during the student's last semester of matriculation in the program. The fee for taking the CPCE is $75.00. It will be offered once in the fall and twice in the spring. Students have two opportunities to pass the examination. If they are unable to take or pass the exam, they can write an appeal outlining a proposed alternative educational experience to be presented to the M.A. Counseling Program Co-Directors for approval. 

Electives 

These courses are intended to broaden the skills, knowledge, and breadth of understanding of counseling related topics. They should be selected with the approval of the student's adviser. Additional courses may be considered by advisement. Please see below for course offerings.

Course Number Course Name 
APSY-GE-2001 Neuropsychology of Behavior
APSY-GE-2003 Social Psychology
APSY-GE-2008 Sexual Decision-Making and Risk Taking in Adolescence
APSY-GE-2014 Psychology of Women
APSY-GE-2025 Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Theory and Application 
APSY-GE 2038 Abnormal Psychology 
APSY-GE-2039 Theories of Personality
APSY-GE-2041 Women and Mental Health
APSY-GE-2045 Action Approaches to Mental Health Counseling
APSY-GE-2055 Child Language Development
APSY-GE-2097 Social Development of Children and Adolescents
APSY-GE-2105 Culture, Context, and Psychology
APSY-GE-2115 Psychological Research in Infancy
APSY-GE 2181 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
APSY-GE-2261 Emotional Development: A Cognitive Perspective
APSY-GE-2271 Survey of Developmental Psychology
APSY-GE-2272 Adolescent Development: Theory and Research
APSY-GE-2279 Risk and Resilience
APSY-GE-2300 Independent Study
APSY-GE-2345 Academic Achievement Gaps: Socio-Psychological Dynamics
APSY-GE-2500 Trauma:Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives
APSY-GE-2505 Clinical Case Seminar in Trauma Studies
APSY-GE-2527 The Development of Immigrant Origin Youth
APSY-GE-2683 Grief and Bereavement Counseling
APSY-GE-2684 Marriage,Couple & Family Counseling
APSY-GE-2691 Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders Theory/Rsch/Treatment
APSY-GE-2831 Families and Schools
APSY-GE-2832 Child Development and Social Policy
APSY-GE-2840 Play and Drama Therapy with Children and Adolescents
APSY-GE-2895 Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Youth
APSY-GE-2896 Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered Adults

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon conclusion of our program, students will be able to:

  • Apply developmentally sensitive counseling techniques specific to school-age children and their families in assessment, case conceptualization, intervention, and advocacy as highlighted in the national model.

  • Form helping relationships with K-12 youth, teachers, and parents, and demonstrate a commitment to adapting their work to the growth and development of the persons with whom they work.

  • Assess students within various socio-historical contexts with attention to issues of power and privilege, including but not limited to gender, race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation.

  • Students in the Bilingual School Counseling concentration will be able to identify issues relevant to student populations for whom English is a second language and apply resolutions in their work.