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Peter Adintori

Peter Adintori

Peter Adintori, MS, RD, CDN, CNSC is a registered dietitian with a background in both nutrition and exercise physiology. Peter began his education at the University of Connecticut, where he received a bachelor of science in Exercise Science. At that time, he participated in nutrition and exercise research utilizing ketogenic diets for ultramarathon runners within UConn's Human Performance Laboratory. Peter then moved to NYC to pursue a master of science at Teachers College, Columbia University in Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, followed by his Dietetic Internship. While at Columbia, Peter conducted research at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital (now Mount Sinai Morningside), focusing on lipid utilization during exercise in individuals at risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Currently, Peter is a Clinical Research Dietitian at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he works primarily on the Bone Marrow Transplantation Service. Peter's research focuses on prehabilitation and rehabilitation before and after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Peter hopes to coordinate nutrition and physical/occupational therapy to optimize patients' clinical outcomes and quality of life.  

Farha Hussain

Farha Hussain

Farha Hussain, M.Sc.A, S-LP is a doctoral student in the Rehabilitation Sciences program. Dr. Nisha Sajnani, RDT-BCT is her principal advisor. Prior to beginning full-time studies at NYU, Farha was working as a clinician in a public rehabilitation center in Tiohtià:ke (Montreal), primarily working with Deaf and hard of hearing youth. Farha’s research interests include critical reflexivity and social justice and empowerment-based interdisciplinary approaches combining creative arts and language therapies with respect to communication strategies. Her critical lens is especially informed by critical race feminism, particularly as articulated by Black feminist scholarship (e.g. Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Kimberlé Crenshaw).  

Farha has also served as a professional researcher at Université de Montréal - École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, as well as a guest lecturer and clinical educator at McGill University’s School of Communication Sciences Disorders (SCSD). She has been honored with a nomination for SCSD’s Award for Excellence in Clinical Education, where S-LP students have highlighted Farha’s skills in effectively mentoring critical approaches to examining research and institutions, supporting critical thinking and anti-oppressive practice, advocating for social equity, and breaking important barriers within the field. 

Farha speaks Urdu, English, and French, and has basic skills in American Sign Language (ASL).  

Claire Kearney-Volpe

Claire Kearney-Volpe

Claire Kearney-Volpe is a doctoral candidate, art therapist, and creative technologist with a focus on digital accessibility and human-computer interaction. Her dissertation involves the human-centered design, implementation, and evaluation of Web Development Curriculum designed for blind students.

View Claire's LinkedIn profile.

John Liu Jr.

John Liu Jr.

John Liu Jr. has worked for 15 years in various settings as an occupational therapist. He is currently a Rehabilitation Science PhD student working with Dr. Voelbel and Dr. Lu. He is interested in the intersection of human skills and abilities, outcome measures, and decision-making processes by both clinicians and patients. He hopes to understand how people improve in their daily life and underlying skills (cognitive, strength, and other physiologic capabilities) based on the intervention provided. By understanding the mechanism of improvement, he hopes to improve the delivery of services for patients by either knowing the mechanisms of how human skills are improved or how to improve the outcome based on the intervention provided. Currently, he is analyzing how self-perceived cognition is explained by a person’s underlying cognitive skills. He is also determining if a verbal-based intervention has an effect and how these changes affect a person’s self-perceived cognition. Hopefully, understanding the mechanism can improve how interventions are targeted to the patient and improve outcomes that the patient values.

Annalissa Vicencio

Annalissa Vicencio

Annalissa Vicencio is a doctoral student in the Rehabilitation Sciences PhD program at NYU Steinhardt, where she also completed her MA in Music Therapy. She completed her BA in Biology - Neuroscience from Manhattanville College. As a native Bronxite, she is honored to serve her home community as a Licensed Creative Arts Therapist (LCAT) and Music Therapist – Board Certified (MT-BC) frontline worker at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM), and previously the Acute Inpatient Adult Psychiatric Unit at Montefiore’s Wakefield Campus. Annalissa holds advanced training certificates in Austin Vocal Psychotherapy, Neurologic Music Therapy, the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music – Level 1, and Music Together. Annalissa’s clinical work at CHAM during the COVID-19 pandemic was featured on News 12.

With speech-language pathologist Ann Clifford, Annalissa spearheaded and co-facilitates the Montefiore Melodies Community Choir for those with a history of stroke or neurologic illness, their caregivers, staff, and the community at large. Annalissa’s main doctoral research topic centers on the impact of group and/or choral singing in communication disorders, and more specifically, how community music therapy singing groups in collaboration with speech and language pathology can serve the needs of those with nonfluent Broca’s aphasia following stroke.

Annalissa holds health and recovery coaching certificates from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, and the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. As the founder and owner of Whole Health Power, she empowers her clients to acquire sustainable lifestyle-related changes for overall health. As such, Annalissa’s additional research interests include holistic and integrative wellness initiatives that address metabolic syndrome in those with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) while considering forces of systemic oppression, critical race theory, and access to healthcare in the allopathic US medical model. 

Annalissa is also in advanced training to become a Certified Practitioner (CP) of Psychodrama, Sociometry, Group Psychotherapy and Action Methods as well as a Drama Therapy Alternative Training student. Annalissa eclectically integrates these creative arts modalities, especially when working with trauma, addiction, mental health issues, and eating disorders. Ultimately, Annalissa endeavors to integrate her training as a clinician-scientist to promote creative wellbeing from the individual level to society at large.

Mark Vorensky

Mark Vorensky

Mark is a second-year Rehabilitation Sciences PhD student and orthopedic physical therapist. His main research interests revolve around how patient-physical therapist communication and therapeutic alliance can influence ultimate outcomes in care. This includes how physical therapists can support patients' perceived self-efficacy to be successful in rehabilitation and maintain a physically active lifestyle long-term. Mark hopes that his research will provide tools for physical therapists to navigate the psychosocial domains of care. In his free time, Mark enjoys running, trying out new recipes, and hanging out with his partner, Shirah, and their two cats, Bean and Babka.