Skip to main content

Search NYU Steinhardt

Nutrition Doctoral Student Biographies

Current Student Biographies

PhD, Nutrition and Dietetics

Peter Adintori

Peter Adintori

Peter Adintori, MS, RD, CDN, CNSC is a registered dietitian with a background in both nutrition and exercise physiology. Peter began his education at the University of Connecticut, where he received a bachelor of science in Exercise Science. At that time, he participated in nutrition and exercise research utilizing ketogenic diets for ultramarathon runners within UConn's Human Performance Laboratory. Peter then moved to NYC to pursue a master of science at Teachers College, Columbia University in Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, followed by his Dietetic Internship. While at Columbia, Peter conducted research at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital (now Mount Sinai Morningside), focusing on lipid utilization during exercise in individuals at risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Currently, Peter is a Clinical Research Dietitian at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he works primarily on the Bone Marrow Transplantation Service. Peter's research focuses on prehabilitation and rehabilitation before and after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Peter hopes to coordinate nutrition and physical/occupational therapy to optimize patients' clinical outcomes and quality of life.  

Shannon Herbert

Shannon Herbert

Shannon Herbert, MS, RD, RYT is a registered dietitian and yoga instructor. Shannon received her bachelor of science degree in Global Public Health & Nutrition and Dietetics, as well as her master of science degree in Clinical Nutrition from New York University. She completed her dietetic internship at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center in the Bronx. Throughout her undergraduate degree, she participated as a research assistant on a variety of projects that looked at overall diet quality and relationships with disease outcomes. Shannon’s research interests lie in the intersection between diet quality, physical activity, and chronic disease. She is interested in understanding how changes in diet quality and dietary inflammation relate to chronic disease outcomes, in the hopes of coordinating dietary and lifestyle interventions that support and promote lifelong health.

Kellie McLean

Kellie McLean

Kellie McLean, MPH, RD, CDCES, CDN is a registered dietitian and adjunct professor with a background in nutrition counseling and type 2 diabetes management. Kellie received her bachelor’s degree in Spanish from the University of Vermont, then proceeded to obtain a second degree in nutrition and dietetics simultaneously with her master’s degree in public health nutrition from Hunter College (CUNY). Kellie’s background as a dietitian began in the Bronx, NY, where she counseled individuals of all ages for weight and diabetes management. She then transitioned into the position of clinical nutrition consultant and manager for various facilities throughout the Greater New York City area. Kellie has an extensive teaching background, having taught a myriad of nutrition and food safety courses as an adjunct professor for various CUNY colleges, including serving as interim Assistant Professor and Acting Director for a nutrition and culinary management program. Kellie also teaches as an adjunct professor for the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University. As a PhD student, Kellie’s research has focused on cultural components of type 2 diabetes management and effective behavior change strategies.

Rachel Ryan

Rachel Ryan is a third-year PhD candidate in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies. Rachel received her bachelor’s degree in Dietetics, Foods, and Nutrition from the City University of New York Lehman College, followed by her master’s degree in Health Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. During her studies, Rachel worked as a nutrition educator for underserved elementary school students in NYC public schools and as a research assistant for a technology-based nutrition intervention for children. Currently, her research is focused on maternal and child nutrition, in particular, breastfeeding promotion. As a doctoral student at NYU, Rachel was the lead researcher for a survey study that explored the barriers and facilitators to pumping on campus as a student mother. She also assisted with a qualitative study on how mothers experience learning how to breastfeed in the hospital. For her dissertation, Rachel will use quantitative and qualitative methods to study the factors associated with maternal use of foods, beverages, and herbal supplements to increase breast milk supply.