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NYU Steinhardt courses that satisfy the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements:

Cultures and Contexts

HSED-UE 1033 Global Culture Wars 

This course will examine the origins, development, and meaning of cultural conflicts around the world. How have cultural issues divided human beings, within their own countries and across them? How have these issues changed during our contemporary era of globalization, with its rapid spread of people and ideas across borders? How have these developments created new global alliances as well as fractures? And, most of all, how can we find common ground across our profound cultural and national differences? Special topics may include abortion, same-sex marriage, sex education, pornography, and drug regulation. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Cultures and Contexts

MCC-UE 1002 Space and Place in Human Communication**

This course will build on a core concept of Lewis Mumford who understood media ecology as a component of spatial and urban ecology.  Emphasis will be given on how space socially organizes human meaning and on the “inscription of space”.  How do people, through their practices and their being in the world, form relationships with the locales they occupy (both the natural world and the build environment)?  How do they attach meaning to spaces to create places?  And how do the experiences of inhabiting, viewing, and hearing those places shape their meanings, communicative practices, cultural performances, memories, and habits?  Course themes include mapping and the imagination; vision and space; soundscape; architecture and landscape; new media and space/time compression; space and identity; spatial violence; and spatialization of memory.  Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Cultures and Contexts
**MCC Majors cannot use this course as a Liberal Arts core class.**

PHED-UE 1016 Religion and Public Education in an International Context 

The purpose of this course on religion and public education in an international context is for us to engage together in a critical analysis of what continues to be an important contemporary issue. The seminar is designed especially for students preparing for careers in teaching - in both public and private/religious schools, educational administration, educational research, or other professions which will involve them in the ongoing public debates about the uneasy relationship of religion and public education in the United States and other countries. The course will examine these issues historically and in terms of current policy debates and students will be asked to make connections to their own educational practice. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Cultures and Contexts

FOOD-UE 1210 Introduction to Food History 

Examination of food from historical and transnational perspectives. Topics considered are: the origins of agriculture; the phenomenon of famine; the co-evolution of world cuisines and civilizations; the international exchange and spread of foods and food technologies following 1492; issues of hunger and thirst; and the effects of the emergent global economy on food production, diets, and health.

Expressive Culture

ARCS-UE 1088 Fashion in Context 

Why do fashion designers and brands exert such influence in contemporary society? What explains the trajectory from The House of Worth to Chanel to Hood by Air? This course investigates the interlocking forces shaping fashion: the designer system, celebrities, technology, politics, the arts, and media. Through lectures and film viewings, readings, discussions, and individual research, students explore fashion as a crucial aspect of culture with an emphasis on how the contemporary fashion system evolved from its roots in Parisian couture to become a global phenomenon. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

ARTCR-UE 10 Art: Practice and Ideas

“Art: Practice and Ideas” examines key developments in the visual arts from modernity to the present. Focusing on the ways in which representations both create and reflect the values of a society, the course introduces students to the full range of expressive possibilities within the visual arts, covering painting and sculpture, as well as photography, film, video, conceptual art, and computer media. Topics to be covered include classical, modern, and postmodern relationships to politics, vision, the mind, the body, psychology, gender, difference, and technological innovation. Students will see and understand how artists have integrated perceptions of their historical moment, as well as physical and social space, into creative practices that have, in turn, had a significant impact on the culture of the time. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

ARTCR-UE 55 Art of Now

This course examines the current developments in contemporary art over the past decade – the art of "now" – from the viewpoint of an artist’s practice and working ideas, looking at current global art production in aesthetic, economic, and social contexts. The major movements in painting, photography, sculpture, installation, and performance are examined. Readings will be drawn from firsthand interviews and point-of-view accounts, reviews, and critique; a major emphasis on interviews and online studio visits will accompany the texts. Guest artist lectures and off-site museum and gallery viewings will complement the weekly visual presentations and theory conversations. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures.

ARTCR-UE 152 The Internet and Contemporary Art 

The Post-Internet mentality – where the Internet is a way of creating and thinking, more than a device – is the basis for this class on contemporary digital art, 1970 to the present. This course looks at current Internet art; video, digital, virtual and mixed technology, and collaborative online art practices. Students will learn how artists are integrating digital technology in the production, display, and public encounter of their artwork. Lectures using images of art and assigned readings will focus on online and digital realities, the Internet as an art medium, contemporary time prosumers, digerati, online social networks, screen mentalities, spectatorship, and new visual formations. Visiting artists and critics will engage virtually and in person so students will be in direct contact with those creating the current landscape of Internet art. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

ARVA-UE 1005  Inventing Downtown: Artists Define New York 

Course explores how Downtown Manhattan become synonymous with art, music, and performance by investigating 20 artist-run spaces that pioneered multi-disciplinary art from the 1950s to today. Course supplements the standard art histories by highlighting contributions by women, African American, and Latin American artists and reflects the broader context of New York’s social history. Students will be introduced to archival research methods and oral histories, two important factors in constructing a more expansive perspective. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures.

MPADE-UE 1278 Dance as an Art Form

Dance is an integral and defining component of cultures throughout the world and throughout history. This course introduces students to dance as a live and performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, examination of videos and theoretical texts, and physical participation in the practice and performance of dance. Through discussions, written assignments, and the creation of original dance compositions, students will explore the history and cultural relevance of a variety of forms of dance within their own lives, larger society, and the global community beyond. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

MPAET-UE 60 Theatre as Art Form

This course introduces non-majors to theatre as a live and performing art through a variety of experiences including attendance at live performances, readings of play scripts and theoretical texts, and the creation of original plays. Through lectures, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore the roles of the playwright, actor, director, and designer in the production process, as well as examine the role of the audience in the live performance. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

MPAJZ-UE 1278 Jazz: An American Artform in Global Context

What is jazz music and how was it shaped and developed by the specific regions around the world? This class will explore the diverse musical cultures that helped shape jazz music into an original art form. Today, music from around the world has been integrated into modern jazz styles including Latin America, Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. By exploring the history and culture of specific geographic points, we hope to better understand the process of jazz through its history as a model that supports diversity in culture as well as art. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

PHED-UE 1017: Literature, Art, and the Path of Life

This course studies an experience that is at the heart of the original idea of education: the experience of living a life as if one were journeying along a path. With the aid of works of literature and the arts. We will examine various feature of this experience and their philosophical implications. Liberal Arts Core/CORE-MAP Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Expressive Cultures

Natural Science

CSCD-UE 33 Voices and Listeners

The course provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary overview of the multifaceted role that vocal expression plays in everyday communication. Familiar voice recognition; perception of emotion, attitude, and personality; and interactions between speech and voice perception are described from sociological, psychological, physiological, and neurological perspectives. Evolutionary biology, cultural differences, singing, and uses in media and courtroom are discussed. Clinical studies examine self-awareness of vocal expression and the influence of vocal quality on personal identity. Voice as communication vehicle for speaker and listener is fully explored. *Satisfies the Natural Science Requirement for non-majors.*

CSCD-UE 110 Science of Language

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of the human language faculty, focusing on the cognitive and neural processing mechanisms that underlie linguistic knowledge and use. We describe contemporary approaches to delineating levels of language structure and review various scientific methodologies used to study language. Topics include language knowledge and use as well as language change and variation. *Satisfies the requirement for Natural Science for non-majors.*

NUTR-UE 119 Nutrition and Health*

Introduction to nutrition science and its role in health and society: nutrient characteristics, requirements, and food sources, energy balance, weight control, dietary guides and food planning, and social and economic factors that affect food production and consumption.  
*Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

NUTR-UE 1068 Introduction to Human Physiology

Introduction to Human Physiology is a one-semester course for students with an interest in healthcare. Little exposure to biology is assumed for this course. This course is heavily concerned with the basic concepts of structural and functional organization of the human body, the terminology involved in the areas of physiology and anatomy, and the understanding of the different anatomo-physiological systems. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors.

OT-UE 1011 Cognition and Everyday Life: The Science of Neurorehabilitation

Through readings, case studies, and observation students will examine specific cognitive abilities that are crucial for everyday activities. Students will study brain functions in normal and brain-damaged populations and will learn about different cognitive rehabilitation approaches from a multidisciplinary perspective. Students will also learn about theoretical approaches designed to address cognitive and perceptual impairments such as attention, orientation, executive functions, and more. Emphasis will be on cognitive problem identification: the evaluation process and presentation of different treatment approaches in rehabilitation science. Course is appropriate for students interested in pre-health, nursing, speech pathology, education, psychology, linguistics, and neuroscience. 

OT-UE 1001 Principles of Anatomy and OT-UE 1002 Principles of Anatomy Lab

(NOTE: both courses must be taken concurrently in order to be CORE eligible)

OT-UE 1001: This course will provide an anatomy foundation for students who are preparing to enter healthcare fields like occupational therapy, physical therapy, and physician assistant studies. In addition, it will prepare students who aspire to attend medical and dental schools and are currently enrolled in pre-med, pre-chiropractic, pre-dental, and related programs. It will provide students with sound working knowledge of the structure of all human organ systems. The relationship between gross and clinical anatomy will be stressed as well as the integration of these organ systems during normal and abnormal function.

OT-UE 1002: This is an introductory anatomy lab course for pre-OT, pre-PT, pre-PA, pre-Med, pre-Chiropractic, pre-Dental and other equivalent healthcare related programs. It will facilitate the study of anatomy through the observation and examination of skeletons and of human cadavers. The relationship between structure and function will be stressed as well as integration of these and other body systems during normal and abnormal function.

SCIED-UE 210 Science in Our Lives: Science in the Community*

In this course we will explore our local community and investigate the relationship between the wellbeing of a community and how resilient it is in the face of change from a variety of scientific perspectives. Students will engage in citizen science research projects designed to learn about community wellbeing and resilience and explore avenues to share findings broadly. By exploring the practices of science from observing and measurement to analyzing and explaining data, students learn to use data and produce scientific knowledge for the public. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 211 Science in Our Lives: Science, Technology, and Decision Making*

In this course students investigate how to think about sustainability as it applies to contemporary applications of materials in fields such as water quality, nanotechnology, energy, and food science. By exploring the practices of science from observing and measurement to analyzing and explaining data, students learn to use data and produce scientific knowledge for the public and begin to explore the bigger question of whether some of the practices in which we engage and the things we use are making our planet sick. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 212 Science in Our Lives: Environmental Issues*

Introducing the notion of citizen science, this course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to solve real-world problems related to environmental and public health. By exploring the practices of science from observing and measurement to analyzing and explaining data, students learn to use data and produce scientific knowledge for the public. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 213 Science in Our Lives: Human Health and Disease*

This course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to understand concepts related to human health and disease while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science. Students explore causes, controls, and natural defenses against a variety of diseases including infectious diseases and cancers.  By studying and conducting the practices of science, students learn to use data and produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 214 Science in Our Lives: Origins and Possible Futures*

This course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to understand concepts related to the origins of the universe and life within it. Specifically, this course explores theories of change over time.  We will study human’s long cultural history of generating explanations and explore how some have projected possible futures. Students produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 215 Science in Our Lives: The Earth System*

This course provides students with opportunities to use scientific information to understand the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system. Specifically, this course explores the flow of energy and materials through the Earth System. By exploring the practices of science, students learn to use data to produce scientific knowledge for themselves and the public while exploring the question of what it means to engage in citizen science. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors.  *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

SCIED-UE 216 Science in Our Lives: Investigating the Human Brain*

Solving the mysteries of the human brain is one of the biggest challenges of the scientific community in the 21st Century. Students will use scientific methods to understand how the brain works and solve real-world problems related to neuroscience. By exploring the practices of science from observation and measurement to analyzing and explaining data, students will learn to use data and produce scientific knowledge for the public in the field of brain science. Liberal Arts CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Natural Sciences for non-majors. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

Quantitative Reasoning

APSTA-UE 10 Statistical Mysteries and How to Solve Them*

An introductory quantitative and statistical reasoning course designed to help students acquire statistical literacy and competency to survive in a data-rich world. The course introduces students to basic concepts in probability, research design, descriptive statistics, and simple predictive models to help them become more savvy consumers of the information they will routinely be exposed to in their personal, academic, and professional lives. Course material will be conveyed through video clips, case studies, puzzle solving, predictive competitions, and group discussions. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning.
*Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

APSTA-UE 1085 Basic Statistics I

Review of the essential mathematics for statistics. Collection and tabulation of data; the properties of frequency distributions; histograms and frequency polygons; measures of central tendency, dispersion and correlation; tests of hypothesis using the normal curve, the T distribution, the F distribution, and the chi-square distribution. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning.

APSTA-UE 21 Cracking the Code

Aimed at students who expect to read and interpret, rather than conduct statistical analyses, this course is designed to help students become better and more critical consumers of quantitative evidence. Using research studies discussed in the popular media and focused on currently debated questions in education and social policy, the course covers key concepts in quantitative reasoning, basic statistics, and research design. Research readings will focus on topical issues regarding early childhood and K-12 education and other social policy issues that affect children.

APSTA-UE 25 Carpe Datum: Data Science for Life's Big Questions

How many types of people are there? When and how will you die? Will you make money? Is the system fair? This fully online course introduces students to topics in data science, probability, and statistics through big life questions. Students learn to code in the R language and use simulation-based methods rather than equations for inference. In addition to fluency in manipulating and exploring data, we emphasize conceptual understanding of topics including stochastic processes, categorical vs. continuous variables, simulation, hypothesis testing, and expected value.

FOOD-UE 1115 Cracking the Code: Understanding Research in Health and Development*                         

Aimed at students who expect to read and interpret, rather than conduct statistical analyses, this course is designed to help students become better and more critical consumers of quantitative evidence. Using research studies discussed in the popular media and focused on currently debated questions in health and human development, the course covers key concepts in quantitative reasoning, basic statistics, and research design. Research readings will focus on topical issues regarding food and nutrition, exercise, sleep, education, and child development. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Quantitative Reasoning. *Approved on an individual program basis, please discuss with your adviser.*

MTHED-UE 1051 Counting and Chance

This course is designed to be accessible and approachable for people who will be future teachers of elementary school mathematics. It is also intended for people who want to broaden their knowledge in mathematics and experience it as a relevant, challenging, and enjoyable field. It is not intended for math majors. It will be taught as a problem-based course that allows for students to explore and develop new ideas, and apply them to real-life situations. The course builds on intuitive understandings of fundamental ideas of counting and chance and moves gradually to more formal knowledge of combinatorics and probability concepts and techniques. The learning experiences offered throughout the course are designed to facilitate student interactions and active roles in the learning process.

Societies and the Social Sciences

APSY-UE 2 Introduction to Psychology and Its Principles

Introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology, emphasizing both the unity and the diversity of a field that spans major theoretical and research areas, including biological bases of human behavior, learning, development, motivation, and social and abnormal behavior. Links between theory and classic as well as contemporary research are a recurrent theme. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

APSY-UE 10 Survey of Developmental Psychology: Introduction

A comprehensive overview of human development from conception through adolescence. Theories of developmental psychology are related to research findings, and implications are drawn for practical issues. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

APSY-UE 13 Social Psychology

Social psychology concepts, theories, and research and their relation to educational problems. Concepts treated are attitudes, values, roles, norms, communication, conformity; areas emphasized are group processes and influence, social motivation, prejudice, and authoritarianism. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences.

APSY-UE 19 Introduction to Personality Theories 

Consideration of the major theories of personality. The work of various theorists is discussed as it relates to personality development through the life span. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

APSY-UE 85 Science of Human Connection

This course is an introduction to the science of human connection and its promise for advancing solutions to our most pressing societal problems. The science of human connection incorporates a wide range of disciplines including developmental and social psychology, neuroscience, primatology, and the health sciences to reveal: 1) the social and emotional nature of humans; 2) how particular cultural values and beliefs disrupt our social and emotional capacities and needs and; 3) the implications for understanding the roots of our problems and how to solve them. 

CSCD-UE 101 The Talking Brain: Typical and Disordered Communication

Have you ever wondered how communication is actually accomplished or who rehabilitates it when it breaks down? This class provides an introduction to the underappreciated processes of speech, language and hearing and the research approaches used to study them. We will also explore disordered communication and the role of the speech-language pathologist and audiologist in facilitating communication. Learn about brain injury, hearing loss, autism, stroke, stuttering, literacy, research methods and more. Discover why communication is an art and a science. Liberal Arts Core/MAP Equivalent: satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences for non-CSD majors.

FOOD-UE 1050 Food and the City

Food is all around us. It influences who we are and how we relate to our surroundings. This course explores food in the city from multiple points of view. Students observe and analyze various aspects of food in the city, from personal experiences to large social issues such as gentrification and food insecurity, and examine the cultural, social, and political aspects of food systems. Students acquire familiarity with basic ethnographic skills and methods such as interviews, observations, visual ethnography, and virtual ethnography.  

FOOD-UE 1051 Food and Identity

Course focuses on how people use food to identify themselves as individuals and as a group.  Students will ascertain the meaning and significance of food in different cultures, by exploring the way that ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and religion influence our food choices. In addition, they will also examine how people transmit and preserve culture using food. Through reading scholarly articles, personal essays, book excerpts, newspaper articles, cookbooks, and viewing films, students will examine the intricate relationships that people have with food.  Course looks critically at the following questions: how can food have different meanings and uses for different people? How does food function both to foster community feeling and drive wedges among people? What are some prevailing academic theories that help society understand some of these patterns of identification and how do societies change over time?

HSED-UE 610 Education and the American Dream: Historical Perspectives

The course will examine historical perspectives on the relationship between public schooling and the promotion of democratic ideals. Students will explore some of the central goals and purposes of American public education over the past two centuries, and the historiographical debates about those goals and purposes. In the second half of the course, students will explore the relationship between schooling and civic education, and between schooling and specific communities, in order to ask whether the goals of schooling might promote or contradict the goals of particular groups who seek to benefit from public education, as well as ways in which education does not promote democratic ideals. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

HSED-UE 1005  Intro to Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

This course introduces students to the central themes, issues, and controversies in American education. What is the purpose of “school”? How did schools begin in the United States and how have they evolved across time? How do children learn? How are they different from each other, and why and when should that matter? How should we teach them? How should we structure schools and classrooms to promote learning? Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

INTE-UE 10 Introduction to Global Education

This survey course offers an introduction to the field of global education. Education in the 21st Century is undoubtedly a central area for international collaboration as well as contestation. In this survey course, we will examine key debates about the role of education in national and international society, examining the multiple stake holders that work to improve education globally, and their diverse interpretations of that mandate. The course will introduce students to the history of mass education as a global phenomenon, and the comparative ways in which it is now studied. Students will examine both K-12 and higher education. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

INTE-UE 11 Globalization and Education

The course examines the conceptual and empirical work on the social, cultural, and economic aspects of globalization and their implications for education. We shall explore education in light of: 1) the increasing de-territorialization of cultural formations; 2) the emergence of global markets along with the post-nationalization of the production and distribution of goods and services - with a concomitant premiss on knowledge - intensive work; 3) new information and communication technologies which are reshaping the structure and meaning of work, belonging, and community; 4) unprecedented population movements and worldwide immigration. We shall examine recent conceptual work, in globalization and its relationships to human experience with a focus on youth. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

INTE-UE 1012 God, Schools and the Globe 

This aim of this course is to explore the uneasy relationship of religion and public education around the world. Through a variety of comparative case studies, this course will explore the ways in which different models of liberalism and the secular state impact the core values governing educational curricula and policy. The following themes will be explored: how secular education constructs or frames religion and how state education impose specific value systems upon students; whether state education systems have a role in teaching values, such as tolerance; and how this could best be achieved while still maintaining respect for religious diversity (through public, private, or a combination of the two); whether secular education necessarily entails the provision of an environment that is free from all religious symbolism and doctrine; and the role of religious based education in a post-secular globalizing world order. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

INTE-UE 1532 Terrorism, Extremism, and Education 

What is the relationship between extremism and education? This course examines instances and theories of national, ideological, ethnic, religious, and political extremism and their relationship to education. Course participants will analyze how state authorities, rebel movements, extremist associations, and ethnic and religious organizations mobilize youth populations, shape public narratives, and use, manipulate, or abuse ideologies that lay claim to collective identities during the development and transformation of extremist movements. The course pays particular attention to the ways that educational systems have worked to foment and prevent extremism in comparative and cross-national contexts. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

INTE-UE 1545 New Immigration and Education in the World

The objectives of this course is to introduce students to a sampling of recent theoretical and empirical work, in various academic disciplines, dealing with immigration. We will achieve this objective by systematically examining very recent research in comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives with a particular focus on the emerging Inter American migrant system. Students will learn about the most recent trends in Latin American, Caribbean, and to a lesser extent Asian migration to the US, and will compare the nature of current immigration scholarship in the United States to developments in other postindustrial settings. An examination of the comparative materials will highlight isomorphic conditions - as well as differences - in immigration debates, policies, processes, and outcomes. This course will be interdisciplinary. We shall examine recent data and theoretical work in a variety of fields such as economics, education, law, policy, psychology, sociocultural anthropology, sociolinguistics, and sociology. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

MCC-UE 1 Introduction to Media Studies**

Introduces students to the study of contemporary forms of mediated forms of communication. The course surveys the main topics in the field and introduces students to a variety of analytical perspectives. Issues include the economics of media production; the impact of media on individual attitudes, values, and behaviors; the role of media professionals; and the impact of new media technologies. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. **MCC Majors cannot use this course as a Liberal Arts core class.**

MCC-UE 3 History of Media and Communication**

This course surveys the history of media forms and communication technologies, charting the historical trajectory from the alphabet to the Internet. It explores mediation in and across time and the emergence and development of different media forms in relation to particular social, economic, perceptual, and technological conditions and historical moments. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 
**MCC Majors cannot use this course as a Liberal Arts core class.**

OT-GE 2170 Disability in a Global Context

This umbrella course explores the implications of disability in global contexts with varying levels of industrialization. It examines how local civic and private sector arenas, including schools, hospitals, markets, or transportation systems affect the lives of people with disabilities. The students will explore and identify factors, which can influence a community’s view of disability. Utilizes reflective teaching models and experiential learning.  Enriches students’ understandings of the impact of context, including enablers and barriers to participation in daily life especially for people with disabilities. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

SOED-UE 20 American Social Movements

Through the lenses of power, resistance, and identity, this course provides an introduction to American social movements from the 1950s to the present. Drawing from history, sociology, and politics, it examines a range of social movements, including civil rights and Black Power, second and third wave feminism, gay and lesbian liberation and LGBT movements, and Right-wing mobilization. The course also examines the question of how social activism on both the political Left and Right has changed over the past fifty years.

SOED-UE 1030 Art and City: A Sociological Perspective

A broad introduction to the political and spatial dynamics of artistic-production in 20th and 21st Centuries. Artists are viewed as makers of culture but also of urban character and geography – essential components in the elaborate divisions of labor which create the global metropolis. Readings and lectures draw from a range of historical periods, geographic locations, and artistic genres. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Societies and Social Sciences. 

Texts and Ideas

PHED-UE 10 Learning and the Meaning of Life

What is the most important thing to which I should be devoting my life? This course explores the existential concerns animating questions like this, ones that inspire our lifelong, liberal learning. It focuses on classic works in Western philosophy, literature, and film and examines them as texts of education. Class meetings will be devoted to a mix of lecture and discussion. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Texts and Ideas.

HSED-UE 1070 The University: The University from Ancient Athens to Corporate Ethos

This course explores the nature and function of higher learning beginning with the Greeks and the ancient academy through the medieval rise of the universities and the expansion of the corporate culture of higher education. Students will be exposed to a vast array of classical works from the fields of philosophy, sociology, economics, and the humanities. Student will apply the works of such thinkers as Plato, Kant, Veblen as well as others to ask critical questions about what has shaped their contemporary college experience.  Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Texts and Ideas.