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Recommended Reading

What to read before Perspectives on "A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty"

Ahead of the Perspectives on A Roadmap to Reducing Childhood Poverty event on Wednesday, October 30th, the panelists and co-sponsors developed a "recommended reading" list that provides insights into the history and research of poverty and U.S. public policy.

Their recommendations include an overview of A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty, five key takeaways to the Ford Foundation Racial Wealth Gap Evaluation, the importance of looking at income instability as a key predictor of child outcomes, Senator Cory Booker's child poverty reduction policy proposals, and understanding the effects of President Lyndon B. Johnson's "War on Poverty."

Read their recommendations below, and don't forget to RSVP!

"The most important report on child poverty in years is finally out."

Vox summarizes the committee's report, and outlines the key programs that politicians could pursue to cut child poverty in half in the next decade.

Read Vox's Overview
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"The best way to eradicate poverty in America is to focus on children."

Read The Economist's Special Report
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Strengthening Social Programs to Promote Economic Stability During Childhood

"Given the considerable evidence that economic circumstances affect child health and development, economic stability can and should be an important goal of multiple policy domains."

Read the SRCD Social Policy Report
Four ladders of descending height resting against an American flag

The Rich Can’t Get Richer Forever, Can They?

"How did the United States go from being the most egalitarian country in the West to being one of the most unequal? The course from there to here, it turns out, isn’t a straight line. During the past two centuries, inequality in America has been on something of a roller-coaster ride."

Read The New Yorker
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