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Cohort of 2019-2020

Two-Year Fellows

Daniel Daewon Suh is a 5th Year doctoral candidate in the Developmental Psychology Program in the department of Applied Psychology at NYU Steinhardt. Daniel's research interest is in understanding how children’s early social interactions and interactions with their environment influence early individual and ethnic group differences in children’s early math (i.e. numeracy and spatial) skills, which have been linked to later differences in STEM achievement and entry into the STEM fields. During his time in the program, Daniel has had opportunities to collaborate on projects with Dr. Keumjoo Kwak (Seoul National University) and Dr. Marianella Casasola (Cornell), and he continues to collaborate with Dr. Melissa Libertus (UPitt) and Dr. Natasha Cabrera (UMaryland) to better understand the early development of early math skills across various contexts. 

Alex Watford is a 5th year PhD student in the Psychology and Social Intervention program in the department of Applied Psychology. Alex studies how formal and informal settings can support or constrain positive identity development of Black and Latino youth in the U.S., with a particular emphasis on schools. 

Cohort of 2018-2019

Two-Year Fellows

Spenser Gwozdzik is a 2nd year doctoral student at the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service. He received a two-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2018. He is interested in studying urban education policy and how its interaction with other public policy areas impacts issues of inequality. He has an AB in Public Policy from Duke University and an AM in Urban Education policy from Brown University. Prior to attending NYU, he has spent the last three years working as a research associate with the Tennessee State Board of Education, where he has primarily focused on teacher preparation and related issues.

Andrew Weaver is a 3rd year doctoral student in the Literacy Education program in the Department of Teaching & Learning at NYU Steinhardt. He received a two-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2018. He is interested in the factors affecting literacy development for multilingual students and the ways that schools can support the social development of students. Andrew received a B.S. in Psychology from Santa Clara University and a M.Ed. from Southern Methodist University. He has 3 years of experience working in the Dallas Independent School District, including 2 years as a 6th grade ELAR teacher.

Cohort of 2017-2018

Four-Year Fellows

Tim Carroll is a 4th year doctoral student in the Higher Education program in the Department of Administration, Leadership, and Technology at NYU Steinhardt. He received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. His interests center on college access and equity, including the educational pathways of English learners and students from immigrant and refugee families. Before coming to NYU, he worked as a college access adviser with College Possible Minnesota, a need-based financial aid administrator at Williams College, and a data curator at the Inter-university Consortium for Political & Social Research (ICPSR). He has a BA in American Studies from Carleton College and an MA in Higher Education from the University of Michigan. His adviser is Stella Flores.

Chelsea Daniels is a 4th year doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at NYU GSAS. Her dissertation research examines the causes and consequences of digital inequality with a particular focus on education. Other research interests include criminal justice, school discipline and the role of technology in punishment. She received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. Chelsea received her BA from Oberlin College in Visual Art with minors in Mathematics and African American Studies. She worked in the music industry as a talent buyer and event producer before completing a MS in Applied Statistics for Social Science Research at NYU Steinhardt. 

Zachary T. McDermott is a 4th year doctoral student at the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service. He received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. Zac’s broad interests focus on using quantitative methodology in education policy research, with an aim to identify and understand inequity for disadvantaged populations including women in STEM, LGBTQ+ and gender minorities, and students with disabilities (SWDs). An encompassing commonality of several ongoing research projects is to understand students as they transition between schools/academic environments. Recent, co-authored work published in Science explores the gender gap in Physics, engineering, and computer science (PECS) major selection, finding low-achieving men are majoring in PECS more than women (at any performance level) and this cannot be explained by an extensive set of student-level factors. Other ongoing research includes: using an RD design to investigate differential consequences of high school exit exams on educational attainment by special education status, descriptively exploring variation in special education across schools in Massachusetts, investigating what differentially explains career interest and college majoring decisions by gender and sexual orientation, and studying the effect of STEM high school programs in NYC on student outcomes. Many of these aforementioned projects are in collaboration with advisors Leanna Stiefel (NYU Wagner) and Joseph Cimpian (NYU Steinhardt).
Zac was formerly the Sr. Associate of Research and Data Management at the Institute for Education and Social Policy (IESP) where his breadth of work aimed to understand how in and out of school factors influence academic performance, attendance, meal participation, and student health— work with Amy Ellen Schwartz, Meryle Weinstein, and Brian Elbel. He earned his B.A. in Sociology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 2013 and his M.A. in Applied Quantitative Research from NYU Graduate School of the Arts and Sciences (GSAS) the following year.

Robin Neuhaus is a 3rd year doctoral student studying Early Childhood and Childhood Education in the Department of Teaching & Learning at NYU Steinhardt. She received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. Broadly, her research interests include teacher and parent-child relationships and child anxiety disorders in early childhood. She is currently working on the INSIGHTS middle school follow-up study examining the impacts of a social emotional intervention implemented in kindergarten and first grade. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a B.A. in Psychological and Brain Sciences and a minor in Children's Studies. Prior to NYU, she worked as an English teacher in Madrid in a preschool and primary school. Dr. Erin O'Connor is her advisor and research mentor.

Olga Pagán is a 4th year doctoral student in the Psychology and Social Intervention program in the Department of Applied Psychology at NYU Steinhardt. She received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. Her current research interests include teacher racial bias and teacher well-being in context, and how teachers and schools can create equitable environments for racially diverse children. Previously, Olga graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in Psychology and from Stanford University with an M.A. in Elementary Education with a certificate in Bilingual Education. After earning her teaching credentials, Olga was a teacher and instructional coach in Denver.

Jacob Schatz is a 4th year doctoral student in the Development Psychology program in the Department of Applied Psychology at NYU Steinhardt. He received a 4-year IES-PIRT fellowship in 2017. Jacob works with Dr. Catherine Tamis-LeMonda and Dr. Natalie Brito, investigating how parents and children play together in their everyday lives, and how those interactions relate to children's learning outcomes and parents' experiences of stress.

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