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Volume 49 Issue 2

Separation and Healing: A Journey Toward Restoration and Recovery in Education

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Editor's Introduction

Separation and Healing: A Journey Toward Restoration and Recovery in Education

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Where We Go Wrong in Equity Work

This autoethnographic commentary includes anecdotes along with scientific background, ending with suggestions to do your best work as an equity warrior. It examines how, when working to dismantle racist systems, there are many setbacks that equity warriors facetime and time again. The author suggests that “warriors” face re-traumatization when listening to the radio, watching the news, even viewing comedy shows—hearing triggering stories from the heated political climate repeatedly. She cautions about the very little attention given to the effect this has on our bodies as equity work is happening.

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Conversation with Delia Arellano-Weddleton

This interview with Nellie Mae Senior Program Officer Delia Arrellano-Weddleton provides important insight on how racial equity has become a focusing lens for the philanthropic work of the Nellie Mae Foundation and how her own experiences and background influenced her path and direction.

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Twenty Years, Ten Lessons

This article features two leaders of the contemporary community school movement who share their reflections on key lessons learned by community school practitioners and advocates over the past two decades and outline ideas about the challenges facing the field in the years ahead. They offer a brief history of community schools in the United States and provide an update on the evidence of the strategy’s effectiveness, particularly in high-poverty urban schools. They also explain how the current “generation” of community schools has addressed two specific shortcomings of earlier iterations of this holistic approach to education. Acknowledging that today’s political climate creates both opportunities and obstacles for education reformers, the authors argue that the community school strategy is increasingly recognized as a compelling alternative to the neoliberal dream of public-school privatization.

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Students’ Civil Rights

This article takes a careful look at political and policy tools that presidential administrations have at their disposal for ameliorating educational inequalities. These tools, the authors suggest, include issuing federal guidance that informs and supports states and districts as they work to implement policies and practices that comply with federal law. However, as the authors point out, the extent to which administrations have chosen to leverage these opportunities to advance educational equity has varied over time.

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Human-Centered Systems

This article explores how school leaders can strategically organize to create humanist systems within their schools to effectively counter the racial bigotry and systemic oppression that has existed since the founding of this country but has gained more attention in the current political climate. Many school leaders are trained to operate as a superhero—where one person makes the right decision and saves the day. Racial equity challenges us to think beyond an individualistic approach and operate in a collaborative way that recognizes and supports all the individuals within that school community including staff, families, and students.

Voices in Urban Education (VUE)

Coming from Where We’re From

Research presented in a narrative form that captures authentic student voices and experiences of African American students, who have faced the complexity of adjusting to and navigating through unfamiliar terrain while simultaneously building nuanced relationships—peer-to-peer and student-to-teacher—across racial, cultural, and ethnic boundaries. It notes that the social and academic experiences, opportunities, and outcomes for suburban White students, as compared to their urban African American peers vary significantly.

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