Current Course Details

Please check Albert or the Registrar's Office site for the most up-to-date class meeting times, locations, and call numbers. The courses will be open in Albert; there is no need to contact the Department directly. Albert wait lists will be available for all courses. Please email us with any additional questions.

MCC Graduate Courses Winter and Spring 2017

JANUARY 2017

MCC-GE 2145 Methods in Interpreting Popular Culture
Professor: Charlton McIlwain
MTWR, 12:00-2:45 PM (January 3-20, 2017) | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: MA Research Course

PLEASE NOTE: This course meets over the January term but can be found in the Spring 2017 course listings.

Popular culture as both a producer and reflector of cultural meaning and a means of communication. Introduction to the fundamental theories and methods for understanding the construction of meaning in film, television, music, advertising and practices of everyday life, tracing the study of popular culture through film theory and mass media analysis to cultural studies.

MCC-GE 2153 Media Activism
Professor: Nicholas Mirzoeff
Class Times TBD – LONDON (January 3-17, 2017) | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Visual Culture and Cultural Studies, Technology & Society

PLEASE NOTE: This course meets over the January term but can be found in the Spring 2017 course listings. This course takes place in London and is via application only. Please see the Steinhardt Global Affairs website for more information.

How do we undertake visual activism in difficult times? The Liberation Lab connects transnational political projects in alternative learning like Free University and Anti-University with anti-racist Atlantic world politics and visual activist practice. We’ll visit key alternative archive spaces in London like May Day Rooms, the Stuart Hall Memorial Library and the London Metropolitan Archive. We’ll meet with activists and artists to discuss how anti-racism and non-hierarchical learning are being thought and worked. We’ll walk through the city to see how gentrification is rewriting space and overwriting histories. The academic goal is to learn methods and assemble materials that might be used for articles or theses. The fundamental purpose is to change your world view.

SPRING 2017

MCC-GE 2130 Topics in Digital Media
Professor: Natasha Schull
Thursdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Technology and Society

This course will introduce you to a range of theories, and approaches pertaining to the study of technology, drawing on disciplines including anthropology, history, sociology, philosophy, and media studies. Through readings, class discussion, films, and written projects, we will think critically and creatively about the ways in which technology and technological change shapes, mediates, and transforms cultural values, political systems of power, and our experiences of time, work, personhood, and embodiment.

MCC-GE 2134 Media Archaeology
Professor: Mara Mills
Wednesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Visual Culture and Cultural Studies, MA Research Course

Explores theoretical, methodological, and archival strategies for research on early or obsolete media artifacts. This seminar functions as an ongoing research studio while discussing central texts in the field of media archaeology.

MCC-GE 2140 Studies in Organizational Communication
Professor: Deborah Borisoff
Wednesdays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Interaction and Social Processes

This course examines organization communication and the influences that create and define organizational climate. Topics include: diagnosing organizational cultures; the effects of gender, culture and race on organizational communication; communication and leadership; and organizational conflict.

MCC-GE 2184 Comparative Media Systems
Professor: Rodney Benson
Mondays 11:00-1:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Persuasion and Politics, Global and Transcultural Communication

This is an exciting and potentially transformative moment for cultural production across the globe. This class will go behind the scenes to explore how culture (music, cinema, art, journalism, television dramas, social media, etc.) actually gets made. We will adopt a critical approach, reflecting on what's at stake, and investigate the social-structural, organizational, and technological forces that partially determine the aesthetic and political qualities of a range of cultural products.

MCC-GE 2265 Communication & Persuasion: Sociological Propaganda
Professor: Stephen Duncombe
Mondays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Persuasion and Politics

A series of analyses of the history, theories, techniques, and results of propaganda in society with special focus on the relationship between interaction (sociological) propaganda and communication in our increasingly technological society; case studies drawn from public relations, commercial advertising, social movements, and the mass media.

MCC-GE 2275 Middle East Media and Cultural Politics
Professor: Helga Tawil-Souri
Wednesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Global and Transcultural Communication

Examines developments of culture, politics, and media in contemporary Middle East through an historical and cultural lens. Course is organized by theoretical theme and geographic location and addresses culture as a site of struggle; the impact of globatlization on Arab mass media; the connections between civil society, demoracy and Islam; and gender, national and diasporic identities.

MCC-GE 2290 Interpersonal Communication
Professor: Susan Fox
Mondays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Interaction and Social Processes

The application of various systems of communication analysis to specific behavioral situations.  Through case-study method, students apply communication theories and models to practical, everyday situations.

MCC-GE 2310 Sound Studies
Professor: Martin Scherzinger
Tuesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Visual Culture and Cultural Studies, Technology and Society

This course examines central themes in the emerging field of “Sound Studies”. We explore a range of histories, archeologies and ethnographies of sound and listening, as it intersects with topics in media studies, science and technology studies, political economy and musicology. How has our experience of sound changed as we move from the piano to the personal computer, from the phonoautograph to the mp3? How have political, commercial, and cultural forces shaped what we are able to listen to, and how we listen to it? Finally, how have performers, physiologists, acousticians, engineers and philosophers worked to understand this radical transformation of the senses?

MCC-GE 2380 Special Topics in Globalization: Globalization and Media Cultures
Professor: Radha Hegde
Tuesdays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Global and Transcultural Communication, Visual Culture and Cultural Studies

This course examines the cultural and political formations of globalization as enabled and accelerated by media and technology. Anthony Giddens used the term ‘runaway world’ to describe the global context in the year 2000. In light of current geopolitics and technological connectivity, this course will address the processes that underwrite the runaway quality of the global present.  How are cultures and crises defined within global circuits of circulation? Students will be exposed to theoretical framings of globalization through an examination of the themes of modernity, mobility and locality. Through close readings of theoretical texts and ethnographies of migration, consumption and flows, we will engage with politics of global discourse and connections.

DOCTORAL STUDENTS ONLY:

MCC-GE 3010 Special Topics in Critical Theory: The Nonhuman: Aesthetics and Politics of Personhood
Professor: Alex Galloway
Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 PM | 4 credits
DOCTORAL Students Only

The Nonhuman: Aesthetics and Politics of Personhood

From climate change and infrastructure to objects and animality, the nonhuman realm exerts a growing influence on contemporary life. In this seminar we consider persons as things and things as persons, but also peer beyond the human into a world devoid of humanity. What does personhood mean in the age of the posthuman? Themes include proletarianization, animality, new materialism, posthumanism, pessimism, and the commons.

MC-GE 3112 Special Topics in Cultural Studies: Black Feminist Theories of Media, Culture, Communication
Professor: Kelli Moore
Wednesdays 11:00-1:50 PM | 4 credits
DOCTORAL Students Only

Special Topics in Cultural Studies: Black Feminist Theories of Media, Culture, Communication

This course examines major texts within the corpus of black feminist theory for how these ideas contribute to the field communication and critical theory and a broad range of contemporary media practices. Moving from the slave narrative of Harriet Jacobs to the multimedia art of Kara Walker to radical experimental poets such as the black Took Collective our work in this seminar unsettles the coloniality of literature, art, the gaze, the mother, the body, flesh, archive and algorithm. Selected authors include Audre Lorde, Hortense Spillers, Sylvia Wynter, James Baldwin, Saidiya Hartman, Katherine McKittrick, bell hooks, Patricia Hill Collins, Michelle Wallace.

MCC-GE 3200 Doctoral Core Seminar II
Professor: Allen Feldman
Mondays 2:00-4:50 PM | 4 credits
DOCTORAL Students Only

Advanced reading and discussion of the foundational literature, principles, and paradigms associated with the study of media, culture, and communication.

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