What’s the Most Important Part About Being an OT? OTD Student Shanteria Carr Shares Her Answer

Meet Shanteria Carr, one of our Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) students who has chosen to study in one of our newest technology-enhanced learning programs. Read on to learn about Shanteria’s path to becoming an Occupational Therapist, and what made her choose NYU Steinhardt to further her education.

What is your background and what made you decide you become an OT?

I currently reside in Washington, DC where I work as a Pediatric Occupational Therapist for the District of Columbia Public Schools. In undergrad at the University of Florida, I took a course called “Introduction to Health Professions”, where weekly, a different health professional gave a lecture to the class. It was through this course that I learned about the field of occupational therapy and the benefits the profession can provide individuals.

I began volunteering with a certified hand therapist at Shands Healthcare in Gainesville, FL. I was originally a psychology major in undergrad, however that quickly changed after a semester of volunteering with the occupational therapist. I was captivated by the interventions that were used to rehabilitate individuals to help them engage in activities after injuries. What I loved about the field was the various settings I could potentially work in, and also that I could work with individuals across the lifespan.

Although I had decided to no longer major in psychology, I was intrigued by the role psychology played within the field of occupational therapy when providing intervention to individuals. The experience from volunteering lead me to pursue a rewarding career in occupational therapy that I am forever grateful for.

What made you interested in the online OTD program at NYU Steinhardt?

I was interested in NYU Steinhardt’s online OTD program because of the flexibility the program offers. I have the ability to complete assignments around my work schedule and also select specialization courses based on my clinical areas of interest of in pediatrics and leadership. Being able to select courses based around my interests was important to me because it will allow me to further develop my skills as a clinical.

An additional advantage for me was the live classes offered through the program. I was excited about the opportunity to engage with professors and other doctoral candidates in real time because I did not want my learning to be limited through only online discussion posts or reading material.

What do you think is the most important thing OT’s do, or the most important aspect of the profession? 

As occupational therapists, our most important role is being able to collaborate with clients and their families to gather information about our clients psychological, emotional well-being and physical needs and developed intervention plans to help our clients engage in meaningful activities. Through participation in meaningful activities our clients are able to improve their quality of life and live satisfying lives. Helping clients participate in meaningful activities after they experience an injury, illness or disability is the core and the most important aspect of our profession.

NYU OT at the 2018 AOTA Conference

NYU OT Students at AOTA Conference

This year NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy students, faculty, and staff headed to Salt Lake City Utah April 19-22 for the annual American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) annual conference.

The theme for last year’s conference focused on the History of OT during it’s 100 year celebration, and this year’s conference focused on the future of the OT profession. In support of this year’s theme, AOTA Vice President Shawn Phipps led a session entitled, “Vision 2025.” During this session participants learned ways the OT community can work together to position the profession for continued growth in the upcoming years.

Faculty at the NYU OT Booth

For the fourth year in a row, NYU Steinhardt OT had a booth in the Expo. Alumni and current students stopped by to say hello, reconnect with the department, and show their NYU OT pride by wearing our popular NYU OT Alumni, Supporter, and Students badges.

The booth also provided an opportunity for prospective students to learn more about the post-professional MA, OTD, and PhD programs, as well as the new online OTD program. Faculty members and staff were on hand to answer questions about the curriculum, admissions requirements, and our remuneration program.

NYU OT Students and Faculty Gathered at AOTA Conference

One of the highlights: Our very own Alison Rangel-Padilla (Fieldwork Coordinator) led a Salsa Dance Break! This well-attended and fun event had conference participants dropping their bags and moving their bodies to salsa, merengue, and samba music on the conference floor.


NYU Steinhardt OT Faculty, Staff, and Student Participation:

 

Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

-Short Course 122 – Senses & Sensibilities: Experiencing, Recognizing, and Providing Support for Sensory Issues from Autistic and Practitioner Viewpoint (With Stephen Shore Ed.D., Adelphi University)

Plenary: Autistic Individuals as Equal Partners in Occupational Therapy Research

 

Yael Goverover. Associate Professor

-Research 2009 – My Way of Staying Connected”?: The Lived Experience of Adults With Multiple Sclerosis as Everyday Technology Users

-Abstract Synopsis:This constructivist grounded theory study examined the lived experience of adults with multiple sclerosis as everyday technology users. Technology is experienced as a means of fostering reciprocal connections to self and others within a context of connection to the world.

Contributing Authors: Batsheva Becher; Ilana Goss; Stephanie Tufano; Yael Goverover, PhD, OTR/L

-Short Course 405 – Everyday technology for all? Limitations and opportunities in assessment and treatment for adults with neurological disorders. Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation. With additional speakers Brocha Z. Stern, MOT, OTR/L, CHT, New York University; Joan Toglia, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Mercy College

Tsu-Hsin Howe:

-CY 3009 – Life Beyond School: Developing a Functional Life Skills Intervention To Promote School-to-Work Transition for Students With Developmental Disabilities with speakers Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education

-Research 1027 – Effectiveness of Self-Determination Programs in Promoting Secondary Transition for Young Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with speaker Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education

-Research 4012 – Parental Feeding Practice and Perceptions of Feeding Issues of Their Children With History of Prematurity in the First 2 Years of Life

 

Patricia Gentile:

-RDP 1001 – Occupational Therapy in the Perioperative Surgical Home, Part of Poster Session #1 Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

 

Tracy Chippendale:
-Research 3012 – Knowledge, Behavioral Practices, and Experiences of Outdoor Fallers: Considerations for Prevention Programs

 

Allison Rangel, Fieldwork Coordinator:

-Institute 025 – (AOTA) Becoming an Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, with additional speakers Jamie Geraci, MS, OTR/L, Stony Brook University; Jeanette Koski, OTD, OTR/L, AFWC, The University of Utah; Jaynee Meyer, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California

 

Students:

Sandra Duarte
-GP 8006 – Cultural Competence in Occupational Therapy: Putting Cultural Sensitivity To WorkWith additional speaker Brigitte Desport

Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education
CY 3009 – Life Beyond School: Developing a Functional Life Skills Intervention To Promote School-to-Work Transition for Students With Developmental Disabilities with Tsu-Hsin Howe
-Research 1027 – Effectiveness of Self-Determination Programs in Promoting Secondary Transition for Young Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with Tsu-Hsin Howe

Margaret Waskiewicz:
-RDP 2006 – Back to Basics: Enhancing Our Practice Through a Return to Occupation
Part of Poster Session with Kellianne Arnella and Nandita Singh, MPH, OTR/L; and
Steve Vanlew
-RDP 7015 – Tying It All Together: Mindfulness-Based Interventions for People With Parkinson’s Disease

Brocha Stern

-Short Course 405 – Everyday technology for all? Limitations and opportunities in assessment and treatment for adults with neurological disorders with Yael Goverover; Joan Toglia
-Short Course 245 – (SIS) RDSIS Hand Subsection Annual Program – Health Promotion and Self-Management Support in Hand Therapy – Bridging Chronic and Acute Care with additonal speaker Brian Connors
-RDP 3001 – So You Want To Be a Hand Therapist? Strategies for Authentic Specialization
-Research 2009 – My Way of Staying Connected”?: The Lived Experience of Adults With Multiple Sclerosis as Everyday Technology Users with additional speakers Samantha Gelon and Kathryn Ross
-Short Course 412 – Update on Upper-Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Physiological, Psychosocial, and Ecological Perspectives

Chang Dae Lee
-Research 5002 – Korean Upper-Extremity Performance Test for the Elderly: Validity and Reliability
-Research 8003 – Korean Upper-Extremity Performance Test for the Elderly: Normative Data and Characteristics of Upper-Extremity Function of Adults and Elderly

Monica Puglisi, MS, OTR/L, New York City Department of Education
-CY 3001 – Common Core Writing Standards and Alignment With Typical Childhood Development in Elementary School: A Scoping Review with Kristie Koenig, additional Speaker

2018 Frieda J. Behlen Scholarship Winners

Photo of Francine Cacciola and Monika DworakowskiThe NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2018 Frieda J. Behlen Occupational Therapy Scholarships. This year’s awardees are Francine Cacciola and Monika Dworakowski.

Francine Cacciola graduated from NYU Steinhardt in 2016 with a degree in Applied Psychology, and has returned to complete her masters in Occupational Therapy. Francine has a background working with children with special needs, and though she one day hoped to open her own school—she now sees the importance of making her holistic approach to learning available to all students and aspires to work as a practicing OT in a public school setting. There she hopes to help cater to all learning styles, sensory needs, and foster empowerment, growth, and creativity with a focus on children’s strengths. She is also a certified yoga teacher! Francine will graduate in 2019.

Monika Dworakowski completed her B.A. at Boston College in Psychology and Hispanic Studies. Her research interests within the field of OT include neuroscience, geriatrics, and anatomy. Monika participated in a summer research project that was a scoping study about how women with disabilities are treated by their partners in Sierra Leone, as well as a current project relating to the effectiveness of cognitive stimulation therapy for those with mild to moderate dementia. She also worked for the GIFTED Women’s Fellowship Program in the summer of 2017. Monika is also a student ambassador, helping welcome new OT students as they begin their journey at NYU. Upon graduation, she hopes to work in a setting with a geriatric population, with a focus on patients with dementia. Monika will graduate in 2019.

The Frieda J. Behlen Occupational Therapy Scholarship is an endowed fund created principally by gifts from alumni of the occupational therapy programs at NYU. Income generated by the endowment is awarded annually to students who demonstrate superior academic achievement as well as financial need. With growth in the fund’s balance from new gifts, the amount given out has been able to increase and will continue to do so. The award takes the form of a tuition aid applied toward summer courses. Professional Program second-year students are eligible to apply.

The fund was named to honor the memory of Frieda J. Behlen, founder and longtime chair of NYU’s Department of Occupational Therapy. Ms. Behlen was known for never hesitating to find monies, even if from her own pocketbook, to enable deserving students to complete their studies.

To contribute to this and other Department of Occupational Therapy funds please visit http://www.nyu.edu/giving/.

NYU OT Students Study Autism in London

This January professor Kristie Patten Koenig and adjunct professor Stephen Shore took OT students to London for the Steinhardt Global course United Photo of OT StudentsKingdom: Comparative Perspectives on Autism and Well-Being. The course examined literature and research findings for evidence that supports treatment of children and youth with autism in a variety of settings.  Students’ clinical and educational experiences were used as a basis to examine the efficacy and effectiveness of intervention through a strength based lens. Advances in strength based approaches including health and education were examined and a comparative analyses conducted.

We spoke with Francine Cacciola, a current MS in OT student, about her experience during the London class, what brought her to NYU OT, and how she sees herself as a future practitioner.

Photo of Francine CacciolaWhat made you want to participate in this global class, and what was your favorite part about the experience?

One of my greatest academic interests has always been working with children with autism. I have taken many courses and worked with many children on the spectrum, so when I learned about the course being offered in London I jumped at the opportunity to learn more about autism from a new perspective.

Aside from the opportunity to explore the beautiful city of London, the course offered so many diverse opportunities to learn from Kristie Koenig, professor and chair of NYU’s OT department, and Stephen Shore, professor at Adelphi University and autism self advocate, as well as other autism self advocates, researchers, and professionals in the field. Unlike classes that rely heavily on reading and lectures, this course was interactive and provided first hand experiences from those living with autism and working with autistic individuals. I especially loved the interdisciplinary approach that the course encompassed. The students represented over 10 different programs from NYU and learning alongside students from other related programs fostered collaboration of ideas, experiences, and perspectives.

How did your time in London influence your view of the current system of working with ASD individuals in the US?

I have always had an interest in working in the school system, so it was inspiring to see the ways in which London is advanced in focusing on strengths in autistic individuals, a focus that I will incorporate into my practice and encourage others to do as well. We had the opportunity to visit the SPA School, a specialized school for autistic children. The school was equipped with full size trampolines in the gymnasium to provide the children with vestibular input, a greenhouse for children participate in horticulture, and art, music, and drama programs to foster creativity and promote expression and socialization. The school also had a coffee shop next door in which all of the students worked shifts during school hours to learn life skills. The SPA school was an encompassment of what I feel all schools should be offering to students on the spectrum or not. As a future occupational therapist I plan to incorporate aspects of the SPA School and what I have learned through the course in London into my practice working with children in schools.

Why do you think viewing autism through a strength based lens is the most effective form of intervention?

One theme that Kristie and Stephen strongly emphasized throughout the course is the fact that we don’t build a life doing things we are bad at. So why should we, as professionals, push for working on things that autistic people are bad at, especially when each individual has so many strengths to focus on. Instead of working solely on remediating weaknesses, we should be working with autistic individuals on creating a life based on their strengths.

What activity during the time in London opened your eyes most?

It is hard to pick one experience that impacted me the most during the course in London because each day was so memorable. One particular experience that truly resonated with me was the morning that we had the producers, cast, and writers of children’s show Pablo, come speak to us.

Pablo is a children’s show featuring an autistic child as the main character who creates animal friends with his magic crayons which represent different characteristics of autism. It was so amazing to hear from the autistic writers and actors themselves about their process of creating the episodes and generating ideas based off of their own life experiences. Most of the media portrayals of autism in the US are written and acted by individuals who are not autistic, so hearing the raw, honest process that goes into creating Pablo opened my eyes to how the US should be portraying autism.

OT Students Explore Disability in a Global Context in Shanghai

This summer students and faculty from NYU Steinhardt’s Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy programs traveled to Shanghai for the course China: Disability in a Global Context. The class was led by Wen K. Ling, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy and Sally Poole, Clinical Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy. This interdisciplinary course brought students together from Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Teaching and Learning, and other programs at NYU Steinhardt. The students explored and identified factors, including cultural factors and health beliefs, which may influence a community’s view of disability.

Students spent two weeks in Shanghai, touring around the city with their home base as NYU Shanghai’s campus. During their free time they took part in traditional exercise classes, toured local homes, ate traditional meals together, and took in the culture of the region. They also learned about education, traditional Chinese health beliefs and practices, current health care, access and public transportation, and social welfare for individuals with disabilities in China.

We spoke with Joy Sarraf, a current OT student, about her experiences in the course. Read on to learn more!

Tell us more about yourself and what brought you to NYU Steinhardt.

I’m from Long Island and I am currently in the NYU Occupational Therapy Masters Program. I went to NYU for my undergrad degree as well and had the best most fulfilling four years here. In addition to the unbeatable location and many other factors, the fact that NYU offers global courses definitely added to the appeal of staying at my alma mater. 

Why did you want to participate in this global class?

For one thing, it was a wonderful excuse to travel to China! The Occupational Therapy Framework always stresses the importance of altering treatment plans based on your environment; being in an unfamiliar foreign country gave me a chance to really see how OT transforms with the culture and environment of the patients at hand. It was an engaging learning experience and also so much fun! Eating authentic Chinese cuisine and seeing the famous beautiful light up Bund, when the skyline of Shanghai lights up, excited me as well.

What was your favorite part of the Steinhardt global experience?

Although there were short lectures in the morning, a big bulk of the course consisted of field trips to hospitals, orphanages, living facilities, etc. Every afternoon we had another opportunity to take a peek into the health care system and daily life of China in a very hands-on way.

In some institutions we even got to see treatments as they were being performed. We all really appreciated these immersive field trips, and it was incredible to view OT through the lens of another culture.

Do you think having students from other disciplines in the class made the experience richer or more well-rounded?

Definitely! In the field, Occupational Therapists work so closely with other health care professionals, especially Physical Therapists, that it feels only natural to learn with them as well and to practice the inter-professional skills that we will utilize throughout our careers. Also, it was nice to get to know some new NYU faces and broaden my network. We all made some awesome friends during this trip and still keep in touch– we’re even planning a dumpling dinner reunion soon! 

What parts of the class did you find most interesting and/or surprising from an OT perspective?

To our surprise, in China there isn’t much of distinction between Occupational, Physical and Speech Therapists; they are all referred to as Rehab therapists and receive no specialized training. 

How do you think seeing how OT’s and other medical professionals from other cultures interact with their patients /clients will help you in your future practice?

I think this experience pushed me to think outside the box and use critical thinking to alter treatment plans appropriately. More and more occupational therapists are traveling abroad to live or to aid in natural disasters. I feel more prepared to be flexible with my treatment in the event that I end up working outside of NYC. I also believe I may be better able to understand the values and relate to my future international patients because of this experience. 

How has Steinhardt helped you to achieve your personal and professional goals? 

Because Steinhardt and NYU in general value the importance of inter-professionalism I have had multiple opportunities to learn from students with different backgrounds and gain a deeper understanding of the health care system that I will eventually be a part of. In addition to my interpersonal experience in China’s global class, I have been working with future health care professionals in my role as Inter-Professional Education Group leader for my OT class. IPEG brings students from all health care departments together, the board consists of NYU leaders from 11 different health care programs. Our goal is it to create events where all NYU health care graduate students can engage with each-other. Some of our events are social mixers to help students network, while others are more academic like our Grand Rounds where mixed teams work together and race to figure out the diagnoses of a case study – all of them help us better understand and appreciate one another and therefore better work together. Working with IPEG has truly been one of my most enriching experiences at NYU.

OT Students Win President’s Service Award

We are excited to share that a group of Occupational Therapy students were recently awarded the NYU President’s Service Award. The purpose of the President’s Service Award is to recognize the distinguished achievements of undergraduate, graduate, and professional students and student organizations for their commitment to civic engagement, and service in local communities across the University’s global network, or for their promotion of learning, leadership, and quality of student life at New York University.
The group of OT students recognized worked with non-profit organization E-nable, which builds 3D printed hand prostheses for children with arm/hand amputations. The group put their OT brains together and created a project to showcase how the prosthetics could be used in everyday life by designing games and activities with teams of OT students, and had the privilege of educating the public on their use and the role of OT in prosthetic training for two years at the World Maker Fair in New York City.

The group included graduating students Elisabeth Bahr, Valerie Grinman, Michael Maish, Lindsay Marin, Emma Petkovsky, Marie Joie Tabiri, Matthew Welt and Lindsay Cecic as well as first year OT students Valerie Aziegb and Withline Olibrice.

Department and Steinhardt Graduation Award Winners

The Department is proud to announce our departmental and Steinhardt award winners:

Marisa Davison, winner of the Letha Hurd Morgan Award, presented to one undergraduate and one graduate student in recognition of outstanding scholastic attainment and service to their department and School

Michael Maisch, the 2017 OT Department Banner Bearer at Valedictory Ceremony at Radio City Music Hall, chosen for demonstrating spirit through leadership and academic excellence

Elisabeth Bahr, winner of the Samuel Eshborn Service Award, presented to graduating graduate students in recognition of superlative and extraordinary service, exhibiting the value of strong leadership in school activities in NYU Steinhardt

Many congratulations go out to our student award winners and all of our 2017 graduates!

 

Occupational Therapy Offers New Autism-Focused Study Abroad Course

Associate Professor and Department Chair Kristie Koenig, will be offering a new graduate-level study abroad course in London this January. The course, Strength-Based Paradigm: A Focus on Autism, will examine the treatment of children and youth with autism spectrum disorder in a variety of settings. Participants will examine the efficacy of intervention through a strength-based lens and compare and contrast the theoretical basis of interventions in the U.S. and the U.K.

“The United Kingdom has been a leader in not only looking at what individuals with autism can do instead of what they cannot, but also is at the forefront in studying long term outcomes. For example, England’s National Health Service did the first study of autism prevalence in adults. This has lead to a more comprehensive understanding of autism as children grow up, which can be used to guide our understanding of strengths and challenges of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Koenig explained. Participants will attend lectures at the NYU London academic center and conduct site visits to local institutions to examine service delivery systems. The course will also offer ample opportunity to engage local professionals and visit cultural sites throughout the city.

Visit Steinhardt Global Affairs for more information on this and other global experiences available to NYU students.

NYU at the 2017 AOTA Conference

 

The American Occupational Therapy Association held its Annual Conference & Centennial Celebration in Philadelphia, PA from March 30 to April 2, 2017.  This milestone event had record breaking attendance with over 14,000 attendees. The theme for this year’s conference focused on the History of the OT profession. The conference also had an extra celebratory tone this year with a special Centennial Bash and Centennial Ball for attendees.

For the third year, NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy had a booth in the Expo. Alumni and current students stopped by to say hello, reconnect with the department, and show their NYU OT pride by wearing our popular NYU OT Alumni, Supporter, and Students badges. We also had a number of student and faculty presenters.

The booth also provided an opportunity for prospective students to learn more about the post-professional MA, OTD, and PhD programs. We were also excited to promote our new online OTD program starting Fall 2017. Faculty members and staff were on hand to answers questions about the curriculum, admissions requirements, and our remuneration program.

We hope to see fellow alums next year at the 2018 AOTA conference in Salt Lake City!

See below for a complete list of department presentations and posters:

Faculty:

Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

State of the Science Symposium:
“Resilience: Occupational therapy and its role in helping to adapt to adversity”. AOTF State of the Science Symposium Speaker at the American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Philadelphia, PA March 2017.

Presentation: Shifting to Strengths and Success: Authentic Partnerships Between OT and Autistic Self-Advocates. With Stephan Shore

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Yael Goverover, Associate Professor

Presentation: Assessing Functional Cognition: Its Importance in Occupational Therapy Research and Practice
Contributing Authors: Carolyn M. Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Timothy J. Wolf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Joan Toglia, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

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Grace Kim, Assistant Professor

Poster: The Effects of Attentional Focus on Upper Extremity Motor Training Using Robotics With Persons After Chronic Stroke
Contributing Author: Jim Hinojosa, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Mitchell Batavia, PhD, PT; Ashwini Rao, EdD, OTR, FAOTA

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Tracy Chippendale, Assistant Professor and Patricia Gentile, Adjunct Professor

Poster: Indoor and Outdoor Falls Among Older Adult Trauma Patients: A Comparison of Patient Characteristics and Outcomes

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Janet Njelesani, Assistant Professor

Conversations That Matter: Doing, being, & becoming a tenured professor: Conversations for junior faculty on the tenure track.

Poster: Test Construction of the Occupational Repertoire Development Measure- Parent (ORDM-P)

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Sally Poole, Clinical Assistant Professor

Short Course: Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy Intervention for Patients With Distal Radius Fractures. With Debra T. Zizik

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Tsu-Hsin Howe, Associate Professor and Jim Hinojosa, Professor Emeritus

Poster: A Postmodern Approach to Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy

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Students:

Chien-Ying Yang, PhD Candidate

Poster: Motor Performance of Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Fourth to Sixth Grades: Differences Among Subtypes
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Yun Shi PhD Candidate and Tsu-Hsin Howe, Associate Professor

Poster: Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Behavior-Based Feeding Questionnaire (BBFQ) for Taiwanese Mothers of Preterm Infants

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Brocha Stern, PhD Candidate
Poster: Time To Learn: A Neurobehavioral Approach After Musculoskeletal Hand Injury

Poster: Older and Happier? Associations Among Age, Affective Symptomology, and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

Poster: Coaching in Hand therapy: Strategies for engagement and empowerment, with Mark Hardison

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Margaret Waskiewicz, OTD student with Steve Van Lew, Daniel Geller, and Liz Martori
Poster: Adult MTBI and Sensory processing

Poster: Determining the efficacy of OT treatment of postconcussive syndrome, with Elizabeth Martori

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Professional Program Recent graduates:

Catherine Stalter (MS Program), Elisabeth Bahr (MS Program), Norhora Guzman (MA Program), with Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

Poster: Afya: A Descriptive Study of Community-Based Long-Term Rehabilitation Project in Post-Earthquake Haiti

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Kristina Fusco (MS Program), Erin Devine (MS Program), Talia Zeitz (MS Program) with Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

Poster 4049 – Afya: The Impact of a Long-Term Rehabilitation Project on Pain and Function Outcomes in Post-Earthquake Haiti

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Marisa Davison (MS Program), Cara Flinter (MS Program), Nylah Lummer (MS Program), Katelyn Ryan (MS Program), Mallori Seliger (MS Program) with Grace Kim, Assistant Professor

Poster: The Use of Web-Based Resources To Facilitate Stroke Rehabilitation