NYU OT at the 2019 AOTA Conference in New Orleans

NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy students, faculty, and staff traveled to New Orleans, Louisiana for this year’s American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Annual Conference & Expo.

For the fifth year, the department hosted a booth at the conference, providing an opportunity for faculty and staff to interact with attending alumni, current students, and prospective students interested in learning more about the occupational therapy programs offered through NYU Steinhardt.

This year’s conference included many highlights:

Award Recognitions

  • AOTF Academy of Research: Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy Yael Goverover was inducted into the American Occupational Therapy Foundation (AOTF) Academy of Research at this year’s AOTA conference. The honor, which is the highest conferred by the AOTF, recognizes elite scientists and scholars who are advancing knowledge in the field of occupational therapy. Read more about Goverover’s recognition and research here.
Yael Goverover posing in front of the AOTA logo.
Yael Goverover, middle, was recognized at AOTA for her contributions to the field.
  • TODOS Service Award: Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Alison Rangel received an award from TODOS (Terapia Ocupacional para Diversidad, Oportunidad y Solidaridad), a Hispanic/Latino-focused professional community of occupational therapy practitioners and students promoting diversity, inclusion, and multiculturalism within the profession.

Alumni Reception and Department Honors

The department hosted its annual alumni reception to facilitate connections between former students — the event was also attended by over 30 current students.

The reception featured the broad announcement of two department honors:

  • Jim Hinojosa Distinguished Alumni Award: Dr. Gary Bedell, a two-time alumnus of the department, was awarded the third annual Jim Hinojosa Distinguished Alumni Award for the contributions he has made to the OT profession while working to benefit youth with disabilities. Click here to read a Q&A with Dr. Bedell about his work.

NYU OT Can Dance

For the 2nd year, Academic Fieldwork Coordinator Alison Rangel led a dance break encouraging conference participants to stretch, let loose, and move their bodies to the beat of salsa, merengue, and samba music.

The department’s skill on the dance floor was further solidified when students Lauren Gramatica, Jessica Si, and Daniel Yi took home the top prize in an “OTs Got Talent” dance competition. Click here for a video of their winning performance.

Faculty, Staff, and Student Participation

A large group of students at AOTA holding an NYU flag.
Members of the NYU OT community on the expo floor.

The NYU OT community presented a range of research and findings at this year’s conference.

Kristin Castle – OTD Student

  • RD 4012 – Exploring the Prevalence of Cognitive Deficits Within a Population of Individuals Post Acute Mild Stroke with additional speakers Steve Van Lew, MS, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health; Adrienne Dicembri, MS, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health; Megan Evangelist, MS, OTR/L, NYU Health Langone.
  • RD 7017 – Identifying Cognitive Assessments for Individuals Post-Mild-Stroke in the Acute-Care Setting: A Review of the Psychometrics and Feasibility.
  • RD 5017 – A Clinical Guideline To Promote Return to Work Post-Male-to-Female Gender Reassignment Surgery. Danielle Kearns, MS, OTR, Intensive Therapeutics, Inc and Tsu-Hsin Howe, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, NYU.

Szu-Wei Chen – PhD Candidate

  • GP 7012 – Measuring Leisure Participation in the Adult Population: A Review and Suggestion for Developing a Better Instrument.

Chia-Yang Chiang – OTD Student

  • DD 8004 – Using Social Cognitive Career Theory to Facilitate School-to-Adulthood Transition for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with additional speaker Tsu-Hsin Howe, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, NYU.

Patricia Gentile – Clinical Assistant Professor

  • RD 3018 – Clinical and Nonclinical Factors that Predict Discharge Disposition After a Fall: Considerations for OT in Early Discharge Planning with Melissa James, PhD, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center; R. Robitsek, PhD, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center; Syed Saghir, MD, Department of Medicine, University of Nevada; Marylin Ramos, MS, PT, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center; Frances Perez, LMSW, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center.

Yael Goverover – Associate Professor

  • Research 8020 – The Validity of the Weekly Calendar Planning Activity for People With Multiple Sclerosis. Diane Rose Allid, MA, NYU, and additional speaker Melissa Orenstein, NYU.
  • Short Course 338 – Remembering to Remember in Everyday Life: Prospective Memory as a Critical Aspect of Functional Cognition with additional speaker Erin Foster, PhD, OTD, OTR/L, Washington University.

Tsu-Hsin Howe – Associate Professor

  • RD 5017 – A Clinical Guideline To Promote Return to Work Post-Male-to-Female Gender Reassignment Surgery. Danielle Kearns, MS, OTR, Intensive Therapeutics, Inc and Tsu-Hsin Howe, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, NYU with additional speaker Kristin Castle, MS, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health.
  • DD 8004 – Using Social Cognitive Career Theory to Facilitate School-to-Adulthood Transition for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with Chia-Yang Chiang, MA, OTR/L, NYC Dept. of Education.

Danielle Kearns – PhD Student

  • RD 5017 – A Clinical Guideline To Promote Return to Work Post-Male-to-Female Gender Reassignment Surgery with Tsu-Hsin Howe, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, NYU, and additional speaker Kristin Castle, MS, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health.

Grace Kim – Assistant Professor

  • RD 1003 – Perspectives on Mobile Technology Use and Home Exercise Programs in Stroke Rehabilitation with additional speakers Stephanie Katz, NYU; Nicole MacWhirter, NYU; Hannah Cohen, NYU.

Chang Dae Lee – PhD Candidate

  • PA 1006 – The Necessities of Postoperative Delirium Prevention as a Standard Practice in OT Acute-Care Intervention.

Janet Njelesani – Assistant Professor

  • Research 5010 – OTs’ Roles in Addressing Bullying Against Students With Disabilities with additional authors Beth Schweitzer OTR/L, NYU; Aisha Faulkner OTR/L, NYU; Hayden Jeon OTR/L, NYU.

Alison Rangel – Academic Fieldwork Coordinator and OTD Student

  • Institute 007 – (AOTA) Becoming an Academic Fieldwork Coordinator. Jaynee Taguchi Meyer, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California and Jamie Geraci, OTR/L, Occupational Therapy Education Consultants with additional speakers Jeanette Koski, OTD, OTR/L, University of Utah; Rebecca Ozelie, DHS, OTR/L, Rush University.

Mary Shea – Adjunct Faculty

  • Workshop 208 – Effective OT Services in ALS Care and Disease Progression. Amber Ward, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, BCPR, ATP/SMS, Carolinas Neuromuscular ALS/MDA Center, Atrium Health and additional speakers Cathy Carver, PT, ATP/SMS, UAB/Spain Rehabilitation Center.

Brocha Stern – PhD Candidate

  • RD 1004 – Pain in the Hand . . . or Head? A Mindset Shift for Pain Assessment and Intervention in Hand Therapy with additional speakers Hannah Gift, MOT, OTR/L, CHT, SSM Health Physical Therapy – Select Medical Rehabilitation.
  • RD 2024 – The Dangers of Specialization: Appreciating the Interdependence of Body Systems in Upper Extremity Health with additional speakers: Hannah Gift, MOT, OTR/L, CHT, SSM Health Physical Therapy – Select Medical Rehabilitation.
  • RD 3002 – A Conceptual Framework of Self-Management After Acute Musculoskeletal Hand Injury.
  • Research 2018 – “I Don’t Have a Magic Wand”: The Why and How of Patient Education in Outpatient Physical Rehabilitation. Abigail Brody, NYU with authors Promita Banik, NYU; Alisa Doshi, NYU; Prema Khan, NYU; Joy Sarraf, NYU, and additional speakers Emma Gentile, NYU; Emma Hecht, NYU; Kathryn Pelech, NYU.

Margaret Waskiewicz –  OTD Student

  • RD 1008 – It Takes Two: An Evidence-Based Approach to Incorporating Task-Oriented Training With Bilateral Arm Training for Motor Relearning. Samantha Levine, MS, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health-Rusk Rehabilitation.
  • Short Course 138 – Road Map to Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Practical Application of Vision 2025 in an Outpatient Neuro Rehabilitation Setting. Claribell Bayona, OTD, OTR/L, CSRS, NYU Langone Health with additional speaker Nandita Singh, MPH, OTR/L, NYU Langone Health.

Faculty Achievements: Grants and Publications Fall 2018 – Spring 2019

Patricia Gentile – Clinical Assistant Professor

  • Youngstown, M. J. & Gentile, P.A. (2019). Supervision. In B.Schell & G. Gillen (Eds.) Williard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy (13th Ed.) Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Yael Goverover – Associate Professor

  • Goverover, Y., Toglia, J., & Deluca, J. (2019). The weekly calendar planning activity in multiple sclerosis : A top-down assessment of executive functions. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 0(0), 1–16. https://doi.org/10.1080/09602011.2019.1584573.
  • Goverover, Y., Genova, H. M., Smith, A., Lengenfelder, J., & Chiaravalloti, C. D. (2018). Changes in Activity Participation Following Multiple Sclerosis. International Journal of MS Care.
  • Saleh, S., Sandroff, M. B., Vitiello, T., Owoeye, O., Hoxha, A., Hake, P., Goverover, Y., Wylie, G. R., Yue, G. H., & DeLuca, J. (2018). The Role of Premotor Areas in Dual Tasking in Healthy Controls and Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: An fNIRS imaging study. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 12, 1-11.
  • Kalb, R., Beier, M., Benedict, R.H.B., Charvet, L., Costello, K., Feinstein, A., Gingold, .J, Goverover, Y., Halper, J., Harris, C., Kostich, L., Krupp, L., Lathi, E., LaRocca, N., Thrower, B., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Recommendations for Cognitive Screening and Management in Multiple Sclerosis Care. Multiple Sclerosis.
  • Chiaravalloti, N. D., Goverover, Y., Costa, S. L., & DeLuca, J. (2018). A Pilot Study Examining Speed of Processing Training (SPT) to Improve Processing Speed in persons with Multiple Sclerosis. Frontiers in Neurology, 9,685. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2018.00685 (Manuscript ID: 389748).
  • Stern, B., & Goverover, Y. (2018). An occupational perspective of everyday technology use for men with multiple sclerosis. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy. https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022618777985.
  • Akbar, N., Sandroff, B., Wylie, G., Strober, L.B., Smith, A., Goverover, Y., Motl, R.W., DeLuca, J., & Genova, H. (2018). Progressive resistance exercise training and changes in resting-state functional connectivity of the caudate in persons with multiple sclerosis and severe fatigue: A proof-of-concept study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. doi: 10.1080/09602011.2018.1449758. PMID: 29618280.
  • Stern, B. Z., Strober, L., DeLuca, J., & Goverover, Y. (2018). Subjective well-being differs with age in multiple sclerosis: A brief report. Rehabilitation Psychology, 63(3), 474-478. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/rep0000220 PMID: 30113202.
  • Goverover, Y., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Assessing everyday life functional activity using actual reality in persons with MS. Rehabilitation Psychology. 63(2), 276-285. doi: 10.1037/rep0000212. PubMed PMID: 29878832.
  • Goverover, Y., Sandroff, B., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Dual-task of fine motor skill and problem-solving in individuals with multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.  Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. 99(4):635-640. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.012. PMID: 29108966.
  • Goverover Y., Chiaravalloti, N., O’Brien, A., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Evidenced based cognitive rehabilitation for persons with multiple sclerosis: An updated review of the literature from 2007-2016. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 99(2), 390-407. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.021. PMID:28958607.
  • Costa, S. L., DeLuca, J., Sandroff, B. M., Goverover, Y., & Chiaravalloti, N. D. (2018).The role of demographic and clinical factors in cognitive functioning of persons with relapsing-remitting and progressive multiple sclerosis. Journal of International Neuropsychology Society, 24(2), 139-146. doi: 10.1017/S1355617717000777. PMID: 28830576.
  • Kalina, J., Hinojosa, J., Strober, L., Bacon, J., Donnelly, S., & Goverover, Y. (2018). A randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in persons with Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) program. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72, 7205205030p1-7205205030p8. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2018.026864.

Tsu-Hsin Howe – Associate Professor

  • Howe, T.-H., Hinojosa, J., & Sheu, C.-F., A qualitative study of Latino-American mothers’ perspectives on feeding their young children (2019). American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Howe, T.-H., Sheu, C.-F., & Wang, T.-N. (2019). Feeding pattern and parental perception of feeding issues of preterm infants in the first 2 years of life. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73, 7302205030. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.029397.
  • Kramer, P., Hinojosa, J. & Howe, T.-H. (2019). Frames of Reference for Pediatric Occupational Therapy. 4th Editions. Baltimore, MD: Wolters Kluwer.
  • Howe, T.-H. (2018). Oromotor Therapy. In J. Ongkasuwan & E. C. Chiou (Eds), Pediatric Dysphagia: Challenges and Controversies (pp. 119-134). New York, NY: Springer.

Amy Hurst – Associate Professor

  • Hamidi, F., Kumar, S., Dorfman, M., Ojo, F., Kottapalli, M., & Hurst, A. (2019). SenseBox: A DIY Prototyping Platform to Create Audio Interfaces for Therapy. Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’19). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 25-34. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3294109.3295633.
  • Kearney-Volpe, C., Holloway S., & Hurst, A. (2019). Entertainment for All: Understanding Media Streaming Accessibility. Proceedings of CHI ’19 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’19). (To Appear).
  • Kearney-Volpe, C., Hurst, A., & Fitzgerald, S. (2019). Blind Web Development Training at Oysters and Pearls Technology Camp in Uganda. Proceedings of Proceedings of the 16th Web for all Conference. (W4A ’19). (To Appear).

Kristie Patten Koenig – Department Chair and Associate Professor

  • Patten Koenig, K. (2019). A strength based frame of reference for autistic individuals. In P. Kramer, J. Hinojosa & T. Howe (Eds.). Frames of reference for pediatric occupational therapy (4th edition).
  • Patten Koenig, K. & Shore, S. (2018). Self-determination and a shift to a strengths based model. In R. Watling & S. Spitzer (Eds.), Autism: A  Comprehensive Occupational Therapy Approach, 4th edition, Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press.
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “Developing Abilities and Knowledge for Careers in Design and Engineering for Students on the Autism Spectrum by Scaling Up Making Experiences.” (Principal Investigator Wendy Martin, PhD). National Science Foundation (NSF#1850289). Funded for 8/19 to 7/22. $514,629 subaward of $1,999,775 total award.
  • Principal Investigator: “Ghanaian Institute for the Future of Teaching and Education (GIFTED) Women’s Fellowship Program-Phase III.” (Co-Principal Investigator Rose Vukovic, Ph.D.). Banco Santander. Funded for 1/19 to 12/20. $278,000.
  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” NYC Department of Education.  2018-2023 $8,401,750 Year 1: 11/1/18-6/30/19. $1,680,350.
  • Principal Investigator: “Long Beach, CA ASD Nest Training and Support.” Long Beach Public School District. 11/1/18 – 6/30/19. $36,500.
  • Principal Investigator: “ASD Nest supports, consultation, and professional development.” Norwalk Public School District. 3/1/18 – 6/30/19. $120,059.
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “IDEAS: Inventing, Designing and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum.”(Principal Investigator Wendy Martin, PhD). National Science Foundation (NSF#1614436). Funded for 9/16 to 8/19. $300,734 subaward of $1,193,170 total award.

Janet Njelesani – Assistant Professor

  • Njelesani, J. (2019). “A child who is hidden has no rights”: Responses to violence against children with disabilities. Child Abuse & Neglect, 89, 58-69. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2018.12.024.
  • Qualitative Research Affinity Group. NYU Steinhardt. Co-Applicant with Audrey Trainor and Natasha Strassfeld.

Gerald Voelbel – Associate Professor

  • Newman, R.M., Alfano, C., Radomski, M.V., Pergolotti, M., Wolf, T, Sleight, A., Leak, A.B., Voelbel, G.T., de Moor, J., Nitkin, R., Daniels, E., Braveman, B., Walker, R.K., Williams, G., Winters-Stone, K.M., Cheville, A., Campbell, S., Lawlor, M., King, A., Ness, K., Srivastava, P., & Lyons, K.D. (2019). Catalyzing Research to Optimize Cancer Survivors’ Participation in Work and Life Roles. OTJR: Occupation, Participation, and Health.
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “Verbal Working Memory and Attention Remediation for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury.” Global Research Incubator Award, $15,040. Funded: 9/19 – 8/20.

Janet Njelesani Awarded National Academy of Education Spencer Fellowship

Photo of Janet Njelesani.

Janet Njelesani, an assistant professor of occupational therapy in NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy, was awarded a $70,000 grant from the National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship to study the phenomenon of school violence in Lusaka, Zambia.

Njelesani’s project, “Generating and Preventing Violence: Schools’ Responses to School Violence Against Students with Disabilities in Zambia,” is investigating how social, cultural, and institutional practices influence inclusion, protection, and education for children with disabilities in Lusaka.

“Although some one million children are living with disabilities in Zambia and the country is committed to education for all children, little is known about children with disabilities’ school experiences, including the violence that may be perpetrated against them,” she said.

Alongside local partners like the Ministry of Education in Zambia, Njelesani is conducting interviews with teachers, school leadership, and students with disabilities to explore the relationships between educators’ attitudes and behaviors and their corresponding responses to school violence.

The findings of her project will provide direction for school violence prevention and intervention efforts, with the goal of enhancing the effectiveness of educator support and school protection policies.

Njelesani’s research will expand upon her previous pilot projects exploring violence against children with disabilities in Zambia — click here to read more about her work in the region.

Yael Goverover Inducted into the AOTF Academy of Research

The NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy is pleased to announce that Associate Professor Yael Goverover was inducted into the American Occupational Therapy Foundation (AOTF) Academy of Research.

The honor, which is the highest conferred by the AOTF, recognizes individuals who have made significant research contributions to the occupational therapy profession. The 2019 class of inductees was recently honored at the American Occupational Therapy Association conference held in New Orleans.

Dr. Goverover joins the ranks of an elite group of scientists and scholars advancing knowledge in the field of occupational therapy. Her scholarship is based upon the need for research studies in occupational therapy that help improve the lives of individuals with functional multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injuries, with a particular focus on enabling these individuals to perform everyday activities.

“I hope that my work (and others’) will improve the lives of persons with cognitive impairments,” she said. “I hope that the research we do will alleviate cognitive impairments and facilitate the transfer and generalization of treatment gains into their daily lives.”

Congratulations to Yael Goverover — click here to read more about her contributions to the field.

Diversity, Equity, and Human Rights: An Interview with Janet Njelesani on Educational Opportunity for Children with Disabilities in Zambia

Photo of Janet Njelesani

Janet Njelesani

Janet Njelesani, assistant professor of occupational therapy, researches how social, cultural, and institutional practices impact the education of children and youth with disabilities. Her work is influenced by her experience as an occupational therapist and disability inclusion technical advisor to international governments and United Nations agencies.

Njelesani received Steinhardt’s Global Research Incubator Award in 2017 to carry out a pilot project on school violence against children with disabilities in Lusaka, Zambia in which she is collaborating with the University of Zambia and Ministry of Education. She uses child-centered methodologies, including arts-based research methods,  to engage students with disabilities. Graduate students from both the University of Zambia and NYU Steinhardt are involved in this research process and are learning how to elicit children’s experience through qualitative methods, as well as learning how to build an international research partnership.

A child’s drawing is used to gain insight into her social experience at school.

You are studying violence against children with disabilities in Zambia.  What led you to your research?

Violence at school exists in every country, spanning across cultures, classes, education levels, abilities, incomes, and ethnic origins, and children with disabilities are at a significantly greater risk than their non-disabled peers. Although some one million children are living with disabilities in Zambia and the country is committed to education for all children, little is known about children with disabilities’ school experiences, including the violence that may be perpetuated against them. The experiences of these students are important to understand because violence in schools can not only cause physical harm and psychological distress, but also can affect a child’s ability to learn while in school.  Many students won’t remain in school long enough to reap the benefits of education as parents pull them out for safety reasons.

What are some of the risk factors that children with disabilities face?  

There is a complex interaction of child characteristics (e.g., type of impairment), societal biases (e.g., disability stigma), and other environmental factors (e.g., cultural beliefs and gender norms) that interact to cause greater violence against students with disabilities. Data from recent national school surveys indicated that the prevalence of non-disabled children being bullied by peers was 63% and virtually all (97%) have reported being physically punished by teachers over the past school year. Despite this high incidence of violence against non-disabled children, violence against children with disabilities is even higher in Zambia where there are greater stigmas associated with having a disability and less resources and services available for children with disabilities to succeed at school.

Photo of Janet Njelesani and members of the research team

Janet Njelesani (left) and members of the research team discuss how to adapt research tools to include students with all kinds of disabilities.

You come to your research as an occupational therapist.  How does this influence your point of view?

As an occupational therapy practitioner and scholar, I strive to carry out work that centers on illuminating issues of diversity, equity, and human rights for children and adults with disabilities living in low and middle-income countries. Being an occupational therapist has influenced how I carry out my research in regard to understanding that the participation and rights of persons with disabilities have traditionally been neglected in research and policy. Furthermore, client-centeredness, which assumes that clients are the experts in their lives, is core to the profession of occupational therapy, so I understand the need to partner and collaborate with persons with disabilities, their families, and representative organizations, in order to combine our complementary skills and knowledge to address the rights of persons with disabilities.

What do children reveal in their art work?

Arts-based methods are one of the many tools I use in my research because they can be adapted to meet the diverse needs of children, for example a child who has difficulty communicating may prefer to draw a picture, whereas a child with a vision impairment may prefer telling a story.
Children often reveal in their art what is most important to them, helping us to understand what supports are already in place in their school community and which we can build upon.  They also express their challenges. From an occupational therapy  perspective, this expression has therapeutic value as often they’ve never been given the opportunity to share these experiences before.

Photo of primary school in Lusaka, Zambia

This primary school in Lusaka, Zambia includes children with disabilities.

What interventions will help schools decrease violence against children?  

The Government of Zambia has committed to developing education policy and improving access to quality education for all Zambian children, including those with disabilities. As this study is being carried out in conjunction with researchers from the University of Zambia and policy makers in the Zambian Ministry of Education, findings can be used to inform policy and develop comprehensive and effective violence prevention that are inclusive of all children, including students with disabilities in Zambia.

Read more by Janet Njelesani:  From the day they are born: a qualitative study exploring violence against children with disabilities in West Africa

 

 

 

Grace Kim Publishes Research on Robotics to Improve Hand Function in Stroke Patients

Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Grace Kim‘s study Photo of Grace Kim Randomized Trial on the Effects of Attentional Focus on Motor Training of the Upper Extremity Using Robotics With Individuals After Chronic Stroke was recently published in the journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The study is also co-authored by NYU Steinhardt’s Mitchell Batavia, Associate Professor in the department of Physical Therapy, and Jim Hinojosa, Professor Emeritus in the department of Occupational Therapy.

The study focused on individuals with stroke and moderate-to-severe arm impairment living in the community. The individuals participated in a four-week arm training protocol on a robotic device in an outpatient clinic.

Highlights of the study include:

•Participants improved on motor outcomes after engaging in high-repetition robotics arm training.

•There were no differences between external focus or internal focus of attention on retention of motor skills after 4 weeks of arm training.

•Individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment may not experience the advantages of an external focus during motor training found in healthy individuals.

•Attentional focus is most likely not an active ingredient for retention of trained motor skills for individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment.

Introducing the Center of Health and Rehabilitation Research

Photo of Gerald Voelbel PresentingThis fall marked the inception of the yet-to-be official Center of Health and Rehabilitation Research (CoHRR), directed by Gerald Voelbel, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and director of the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program.

The mission of the CoHRR is to generate and disseminate scientific knowledge to improve human health, functioning, participation, and quality of life among individuals, groups, and communities. The CoHRR fosters interdisciplinary collaboration that furthers basic, applied, and translational health and rehabilitation research.

The CoHRR held it’s Inaugural Research Symposium in September to highlight Steinhardt’s health and rehabilitation researchers. Speakers at the symposium included faculty from Steinhardt’s Music Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Communicative Sciences and Disorders, and Nutrition departments. The center also hosted two additional visiting speakers Dr. Juan Carlos Arango Lasprilla of the Biocruces Health Research Center in Bilbao, Spain and Kaitlyn Tona, Au.D. of NYU Langone during the fall semester.

Faculty Achievements: Grants and Publications Summer/Fall 2017

A complete list of achievements by the faculty of the NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy.

GRANTS

Kristie Patten Koenig

  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” Skaneateles Central School District. 9/1/17-6/30/18. $53,749
  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” NYC Department of Education. 7/1/17-6/30/18. $1,555,551
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “Ghanaian Institute for the Future of Teaching and Education (GIFTED) Women’s Fostering Program”. (Co-Principal Investigator). Newman’s Own Foundation. 6/30/17 – 7/1/18 $35,000

Tsu-Hsin Howe

  • 2017: New York University, The Steinhardt School of Education: Faculty Challenge Grant: Cross-Department Collaboration Award

Grace Kim

  • 2017-2018 Co-Principal Investigator: “Using Sensors to Capture Arm Impairment in Individuals with Stroke”. New York University Research Challenge Grant, $14,000
  • 2017-2018 Co-Principal Investigator: “Using Sensors to Capture Arm Impairment in Individuals with Stroke”. Steinhardt Faculty Challenge Grant $10,000

Janet Njelesani

  • 2017-2018 Principal Investigator: Occupational Therapy Research Group on Disability-based Violence. NYU Provost’s Global Research Initiative Award. $10,000.
  • 2017-2018 Principal Investigator: School violence against children with disabilities in Lusaka, Zambia: A pilot study. NYU Steinhardt Global Research Incubator Award. $10,000.

PUBLICATIONS

Tracy Chippendale

  • Chen, S.W. & Chippendale, T. (accepted). The Issue Is: Leisure as ends, not just means in occupational therapy intervention. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Chippendale, T. (2018). Predicting use of outdoor fall prevention strategies: Considerations for prevention practices. Journal of Applied Gerontology, Early online.
  • Boltz, M., Lee, K. H., Chippendale, T. & Trotta, R. L. (2018). Pre-admission functional decline in hospitalized persons with Dementia: The influence of family caregiver factors. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Early online.
  • Chippendale, T & Raveis, V. (2017). Knowledge, behavioral practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: Implications for prevention programs. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Early online.
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A. & James, M. K. (2017). Characteristics and outcomes of falls among older adult trauma patients: Considerations for injury prevention programs. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Early online.

Patricia Gentile

  • James, M., Saghir, M., Victor, M., Gentile, P.A.  (in press).  Characterization of fall patients: Does age matter?  Journal of Safety Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsr.2017.12.010                                                                                     
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A. and James, M. K. (2017). Characteristics and consequences of falls among older adult trauma patients: Considerations for injury prevention programs. Aust Occup Ther J.  https://doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12380
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A., James, M. K., and Melnic, G. (2017) Indoor and outdoor falls among older adult trauma patients: A comparison of patient characteristics, associated factors and outcomes. Geriatr Gerontol Int, 17: 905–912. doi: 10.1111/ggi.12800

Yael Goverover

  • Stern, B., Strober, L., DeLuca, J., & Goverover, Y. (Accepted, December 14, 2017).  Subjective Well-being Differs with Age in Multiple Sclerosis: A Brief Report. Rehabilitation Psychology.
  • Goverover, Y., & DeLuca, J. (Accepted, November 21, 2017). Assessing Everyday Life Functional Activity using Actual RealityTM in Persons with MS. Rehabilitation Psychology.
  • Goverover, Y., Sandroff, B., & DeLuca, J. (Accepted, October 13, 2017). Dual-Task of Fine Motor skill and Problem-Solving in   Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot study.  Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.
  • Goverover Y., Chiaravalloti, N., O’Brien, A., & DeLuca, J. (2017). Evidenced Based Cognitive Rehabilitation for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: An Updated Review of the Literature from 2007-2016. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. pii: S0003-9993(17)31117-6. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.021. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Costa, S. L., DeLuca, J., Sandroff, B. M., Goverover, Y., & Chiaravalloti, N. D. (Accepted, July 6, 2017). The role of demographic and clinical factors in cognitive functioning of persons with relapsing-remitting and progressive multiple sclerosis. Journal of Imternational Neuropsychology Society.
  • Kalina, J., Hinojosa, J., Strober, L., Bacon, J., Donnelly, S., & Goverover, Y. (Accepted, June 19, 2017). A randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in persons with Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) program. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Goverover, Y., Chiaravalloti, N.,Genova, H & DeLuca, J. (2017). An RCT to Treat Impaired Learning and Memory in Multiple Sclerosis: The self-GEN Trial. Multiple Sclerosis. 1:1352458517709955. doi: 10.1177/1352458517709955.

Tsu-Hsin Howe

  • Howe, T.-H., Chen, H.-L., Lee, C. C., Chen, Y.-D., & Wang, T.-N. (2017). The Computerized Perceptual Motor Skills Assessment (CPMSA): A new visual perceptual motor skills evaluation tool for children in early elementary grades. Research in Developmental Disability, 69, 30-38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2017.07.010

Grace Kim

  • Kim, GJ, Taub, M., Creelman, C., Cahalan, C., O’Dell, M.W., & Stein, J. (accepted). Hand training utilizing electromyography-triggered robotics for individuals after chronic stroke. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Kim, G.J., Hinojosa, J., Rao, A., Batavia, M., & O’Dell, M.W. (2017). Randomized trial on the effects of attentional focus on motor training of the upper extremity using robotics with individuals after chronic stroke. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(10), e35. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2017.06.005

Janet Njelesani

  • Dean L., Mulamba, C.,  Njelesani J., Mbabazi, P. & Bates I. (in press, 2018). Establishing an international laboratory network for neglected tropical diseases: Understanding existing capacity in five WHO regions. International Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health.
  • Njelesani J., Hashemi, G., Cameron, C., Cameron, D., Richard, D., & Parnes, P. (2018). From the day they are born: A qualitative study exploring violence against children with disabilities in West Africa. BMC Public Health; doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5057-x
  • Hui N., Vickery E., Njelesani J., & Cameron D. (2017). Gendered experiences of inclusive education for children with disabilities in West and East Africa. International Journal of Inclusive Education; doi: 10.1080/13603116.2017.1370740

Anita Perr

  • Koch, KE & Perr, A. (2018). Application of Wheelchair and Seating Standards: From Inside the Test Lab and Beyond. In ML Lange and JL Minkel (eds) Seating and Wheeled Mobility: A Clinical Resource Guide. Thorofare, NJ: Slack.

 

Occupational Therapy Scholar Series: Fall 2017

The Fall 2017 semester brought three expert guest speakers to the department of Occupational Therapy as part of our OT Scholar Series. We were honored to have these insightful researchers visit the department to speak to students, faculty, and staff about current issues in the field.

Dr. Peii Chen, Research Scientist, Kessler Foundation
Topic: Rehabilitation Research on Spatial Neglect

Dr. Peii Chen is a neurorehabilitation scientist at Kessler Foundation. Dr. Chen’s work is mostly focused on spatial neglect. It is a common syndrome following a traumatic brain injury or a stroke. Spatial neglect and its related disorders provide great insights to the understanding of spatial cognition and its underlying neural networks. Symptoms of spatial neglect can be manifested in various ways depending on the impaired sector or reference frame of spatial representation, the affected perceptual modality, or the ability in motor control. There is no single treatment that effectively ameliorates every symptom.  Dr. Chen has been working on developing and refining clinical assessment and treatment tools for patients with spatial neglect, naming the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (KF-NAP™) and the Kessler Foundation Prism Adaptation Treatment (KF-PAT™).

Abraham A. Brody, PhD, RN, FPCN, Associate Professor, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, Associate Director, Hartford institute for Geriatric Nursing
Topic: Utilizing Community-Based Participatory Research to Develop Interprofessional Interventions in Caring for Vulnerable Populations

Dr. Brody is an expert in home-based inter-professional care of seriously ill older adults. His program of research focuses on how to improve symptom assessment and management of dementia and other chronic conditions through inter-professional care in community based settings including home health and hospice. He also seeks to understand how effective inter-professional care in these settings effects quality of life, healthcare utilization, and healthcare costs. Dr. Brody is a current Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar, a Cambia Healthcare Foundation Sojourns Scholar, and has multiple grants from the NIH, John A. Hartford Foundation, and VA in this area.

Dr. Ji-Hyuk Park, PhD, OT, Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Republic of Korea
Topic: Therapeutic Effects of Occupation in Neurological Disorders

In occupational therapy, occupation is the therapeutic media used to improve the functional performance of participation and quality of life. Natural motivated behavior, animal model of occupation, increases the levels of neurotrophic factors enhancing neural plasticity. Experience and occupation guide changes in the neural system, as reported by nonscientific evidence in animal and human studies. Experience-dependent plasticity is induced by occupational experiences in human. Therapeutic occupation used for patients with neurological disorder should be a motivated task-oriented activity specified to a target performance skill, highly intensive, and close to a real occupation in everyday life. This kind of therapeutic activity can enhance functional recovery through experience-dependent plasticity in the human brain.

 

Janet Njelesani Awarded Funding from Provost’s Global Research Initiative

Janet Njelesani, assistant professor in the OT department, has received funding of $10,000 from the Provost’s Global Research Initiative to establish a Global Disability-based Violence Research Group for the field of occupational therapy.
Reducing violence against persons with disabilities is a task not just for social and justice services but for the health and rehabilitation sector too. To date occupational therapy has played a limited role in this discourse. The aim is to bring together occupational therapy researchers and have an initial coordination workshop to discuss the feasibility of establishing a Global Disability-based Violence Research Group for the field of occupational therapy that aims to gather, collate, review, and carry out research to help understand, monitor, and alleviate disability-based violence.  The initial workshop will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in May 2018.