Clinical Assistant Professor Karen Buckley Retires

In August 2017, longtime faculty member Karen A. Buckley retired from the Department of Occupational Therapy. Karen received her MA in Photo of Professor Karen Buckley.occupational therapy from NYU in 1977 and began the academic portion of her career in 1985 at NYU.

Because Karen had spent those intervening years as a practicing therapist in adult rehabilitation, initially her teaching focused on patients and clients with neurological deficits. As a clinical line faculty, Karen was able to explore other practice areas in OT. Along with two colleagues, she established a pediatric private practice for school age children. She also worked in a hand therapy private practice and encouraged the therapists to be more functional in their treatment approaches.

This in-depth experience in a number of practice areas enabled Karen to branch out and teach over 20 different courses during her employment at NYU. These courses included: ​Neuroscience, Human Development, Fieldwork Seminars, Domain of Concern, Community Practice, Human Performance I, Skills and Purposeful Activities, and Community Outreach Seminar. Karen also enjoyed the advisement process and became very interested in helping students develop strategies for better test-taking skills. It was not unusual for Karen to spend an hour or more with individual students as they reviewed tests and assignments.

Karen served as the Director of the Undergraduate Program until it was phased out in 2001, and she was named Professional Program Director under Jim Hinojosa’s leadership when he was the Departmental Chair. Karen has participated in and survived 8 ACOTE accreditation visits and 3 department location changes!

We are grateful for all of Karen’s hard work and dedication to our profession and the department during the past 32 years. We are happy to welcome her back as an adjunct instructor during the 2017-2018 academic year teaching one of her favorite courses: Analysis of Human Activity I; the course where she can teach the areas she is passionate about– occupation/activity analysis, mobility, and safe handling techniques.

Grace Kim Publishes Research on Robotics to Improve Hand Function in Stroke Patients

Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Grace Kim‘s study Randomized Trial on the Effects of Attentional Focus on Motor Training of the Upper Extremity Using Robotics With Individuals After Chronic Stroke was recently published in the journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The study is also co-authored by NYU Steinhardt’s Mitchell Batavia, Associate Professor in the department of Physical Therapy, and Jim Hinojosa, Professor Emeritus in the department of Occupational Therapy.

The study focused on individuals with stroke and moderate-to-severe arm impairment living in the community. The individuals participated in a four-week arm training protocol on a robotic device in an outpatient clinic.

Highlights of the study include:

•Participants improved on motor outcomes after engaging in high-repetition robotics arm training.

•There were no differences between external focus or internal focus of attention on retention of motor skills after 4 weeks of arm training.

•Individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment may not experience the advantages of an external focus during motor training found in healthy individuals.

•Attentional focus is most likely not an active ingredient for retention of trained motor skills for individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment.

Introducing the Center of Health and Rehabilitation Research

This fall marked the inception of the yet-to-be official Center of Health and Rehabilitation Research (CoHRR), directed by Gerald Voelbel, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and director of the PhD in Rehabilitation Sciences program.

The mission of the CoHRR is to generate and disseminate scientific knowledge to improve human health, functioning, participation, and quality of life among individuals, groups, and communities. The CoHRR fosters interdisciplinary collaboration that furthers basic, applied, and translational health and rehabilitation research.

The CoHRR held it’s Inaugural Research Symposium in September to highlight Steinhardt’s health and rehabilitation researchers. Speakers at the symposium included faculty from Steinhardt’s Music Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Communicative Sciences and Disorders, and Nutrition departments. The center also hosted two additional visiting speakers Dr. Juan Carlos Arango Lasprilla of the Biocruces Health Research Center in Bilbao, Spain and Kaitlyn Tona, Au.D. of NYU Langone during the fall semester.

Faculty Achievements: Grants and Publications Summer/Fall 2017

A complete list of achievements by the faculty of the NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy.


Kristie Patten Koenig

  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” Skaneateles Central School District. 9/1/17-6/30/18. $53,749
  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” NYC Department of Education. 7/1/17-6/30/18. $1,555,551
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “Ghanaian Institute for the Future of Teaching and Education (GIFTED) Women’s Fostering Program”. (Co-Principal Investigator). Newman’s Own Foundation. 6/30/17 – 7/1/18 $35,000

Tsu-Hsin Howe

  • 2017: New York University, The Steinhardt School of Education: Faculty Challenge Grant: Cross-Department Collaboration Award

Grace Kim

  • 2017-2018 Co-Principal Investigator: “Using Sensors to Capture Arm Impairment in Individuals with Stroke”. New York University Research Challenge Grant, $14,000
  • 2017-2018 Co-Principal Investigator: “Using Sensors to Capture Arm Impairment in Individuals with Stroke”. Steinhardt Faculty Challenge Grant $10,000

Janet Njelesani

  • 2017-2018 Principal Investigator: Occupational Therapy Research Group on Disability-based Violence. NYU Provost’s Global Research Initiative Award. $10,000.
  • 2017-2018 Principal Investigator: School violence against children with disabilities in Lusaka, Zambia: A pilot study. NYU Steinhardt Global Research Incubator Award. $10,000.


Tracy Chippendale

  • Chen, S.W. & Chippendale, T. (accepted). The Issue Is: Leisure as ends, not just means in occupational therapy intervention. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Chippendale, T. (2018). Predicting use of outdoor fall prevention strategies: Considerations for prevention practices. Journal of Applied Gerontology, Early online.
  • Boltz, M., Lee, K. H., Chippendale, T. & Trotta, R. L. (2018). Pre-admission functional decline in hospitalized persons with Dementia: The influence of family caregiver factors. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Early online.
  • Chippendale, T & Raveis, V. (2017). Knowledge, behavioral practices, and experiences of outdoor fallers: Implications for prevention programs. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Early online.
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A. & James, M. K. (2017). Characteristics and outcomes of falls among older adult trauma patients: Considerations for injury prevention programs. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Early online.

Patricia Gentile

  • James, M., Saghir, M., Victor, M., Gentile, P.A.  (in press).  Characterization of fall patients: Does age matter?  Journal of Safety Research.                                                                                     
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A. and James, M. K. (2017). Characteristics and consequences of falls among older adult trauma patients: Considerations for injury prevention programs. Aust Occup Ther J.  https://doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12380
  • Chippendale, T., Gentile, P. A., James, M. K., and Melnic, G. (2017) Indoor and outdoor falls among older adult trauma patients: A comparison of patient characteristics, associated factors and outcomes. Geriatr Gerontol Int, 17: 905–912. doi: 10.1111/ggi.12800

Yael Goverover

  • Stern, B., Strober, L., DeLuca, J., & Goverover, Y. (Accepted, December 14, 2017).  Subjective Well-being Differs with Age in Multiple Sclerosis: A Brief Report. Rehabilitation Psychology.
  • Goverover, Y., & DeLuca, J. (Accepted, November 21, 2017). Assessing Everyday Life Functional Activity using Actual RealityTM in Persons with MS. Rehabilitation Psychology.
  • Goverover, Y., Sandroff, B., & DeLuca, J. (Accepted, October 13, 2017). Dual-Task of Fine Motor skill and Problem-Solving in   Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot study.  Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.
  • Goverover Y., Chiaravalloti, N., O’Brien, A., & DeLuca, J. (2017). Evidenced Based Cognitive Rehabilitation for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: An Updated Review of the Literature from 2007-2016. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. pii: S0003-9993(17)31117-6. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.021. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Costa, S. L., DeLuca, J., Sandroff, B. M., Goverover, Y., & Chiaravalloti, N. D. (Accepted, July 6, 2017). The role of demographic and clinical factors in cognitive functioning of persons with relapsing-remitting and progressive multiple sclerosis. Journal of Imternational Neuropsychology Society.
  • Kalina, J., Hinojosa, J., Strober, L., Bacon, J., Donnelly, S., & Goverover, Y. (Accepted, June 19, 2017). A randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in persons with Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) program. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Goverover, Y., Chiaravalloti, N.,Genova, H & DeLuca, J. (2017). An RCT to Treat Impaired Learning and Memory in Multiple Sclerosis: The self-GEN Trial. Multiple Sclerosis. 1:1352458517709955. doi: 10.1177/1352458517709955.

Tsu-Hsin Howe

  • Howe, T.-H., Chen, H.-L., Lee, C. C., Chen, Y.-D., & Wang, T.-N. (2017). The Computerized Perceptual Motor Skills Assessment (CPMSA): A new visual perceptual motor skills evaluation tool for children in early elementary grades. Research in Developmental Disability, 69, 30-38.

Grace Kim

  • Kim, GJ, Taub, M., Creelman, C., Cahalan, C., O’Dell, M.W., & Stein, J. (accepted). Hand training utilizing electromyography-triggered robotics for individuals after chronic stroke. American Journal of Occupational Therapy.
  • Kim, G.J., Hinojosa, J., Rao, A., Batavia, M., & O’Dell, M.W. (2017). Randomized trial on the effects of attentional focus on motor training of the upper extremity using robotics with individuals after chronic stroke. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(10), e35. doi:

Janet Njelesani

  • Dean L., Mulamba, C.,  Njelesani J., Mbabazi, P. & Bates I. (in press, 2018). Establishing an international laboratory network for neglected tropical diseases: Understanding existing capacity in five WHO regions. International Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health.
  • Njelesani J., Hashemi, G., Cameron, C., Cameron, D., Richard, D., & Parnes, P. (2018). From the day they are born: A qualitative study exploring violence against children with disabilities in West Africa. BMC Public Health; doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5057-x
  • Hui N., Vickery E., Njelesani J., & Cameron D. (2017). Gendered experiences of inclusive education for children with disabilities in West and East Africa. International Journal of Inclusive Education; doi: 10.1080/13603116.2017.1370740 

Anita Perr

  • Koch, KE & Perr, A. (2018). Application of Wheelchair and Seating Standards: From Inside the Test Lab and Beyond. In ML Lange and JL Minkel (eds) Seating and Wheeled Mobility: A Clinical Resource Guide. Thorofare, NJ: Slack.


Remembering Anne Cronin Mosey

A scholar, educator, and epistemologist, Anne Cronin Mosey, Ph.D., OT, FAOTA (1938-2017) devoted her life to advancing occupational therapy. Mosey grew up in Minneapolis, Minnesota and earned a B.S. in Occupational Therapy from the University of Minnesota in 1961. After graduation, Mosey moved to New York City to work with Gail Fidler. During the five years that Mosey worked with Fidler, she was encouraged to seek advanced education and to engage in self-directed learning. During those years, Mosey learned the value of theory-based intervention and the importance of providing client-centered activities.

In 1965, Mosey enrolled in the advanced Masters of Arts degree program in the Department of Occupational Therapy at New York University, earning her degree in 1965. Committed to advancing her knowledge, she then enrolled in a Doctorate of Philosophy program in Human Relations and Community Studies at Columbia University.

In 1966, Mosey became a faculty member in Columbia University’s Occupational Therapy Program, where she completed her doctoral degree in 1968. Dr. Mosey then returned to NYU as a faculty member in the Department of Occupational Therapy. There she would serve in multiple roles including professor, chair, and division head. During her time at NYU she established the first Doctorate of Philosophy degree program in occupational therapy in the world.

The focus of Dr. Mosey’s scholarship changed in response to advancing knowledge and changes in the profession. Although not often recognized, Dr. Mosey’s contributions as an educator extended far beyond the classroom. Numerous students have noted that Mosey changed the way they thought about the profession, and that she encouraged them to think like scholars, making learning both challenging and supportive.

Mosey’s most significant contributions can be categorized into two interconnected phases. During the first phase, she focused on the importance of the theoretically sound basis for practice. She observed that the Profession did not currently have accepted guidelines for intervention. She conceptualized the frame of reference for OT’s unique guideline for intervention. These guidelines provided a solid theoretical basis for therapists to provide intervention. The new frame of reference was also crucial for the Profession because it recognized that a client-centered approach for intervention begins with learning and evaluating the client’s individual needs.

During the second phase of her professional career, Dr. Mosey engaged in exploring the philosophy of applied scientific inquiry and the philosophy of the science-based profession. She recognized that as an applied profession, basic scientific inquiry would not support the efficacy of occupational therapy interventions. She proposed methods for examining the efficacy of frames of reference. During this time, grounded in pluralistic philosophy, she argued that the profession needed to devote its limited resources to examining its frames of reference and not developing basic science.

In 1975, Dr. Mosey was inducted into the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Roster of Fellows. Her contribution to the scholarship of the field of OT was acknowledged in 1985 when she received the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Eleanor Clark Slagle lectureship. In her lecture, she presented a controversial title, “A Monistic or a Pluralistic Approach to Professional Identity?” In 2003, New York University established the Anne Cronin Mosey Lectureship in her honor to address controversial issues facing the OT profession. Dr. Mosey’s work continues to influence future occupational therapy scholars as well as inspire the faculty in NYU Steinhardt’s OT department. She will be truly missed.

Kristie Patten Koenig Wins Patricia Buehler Legacy Award for Clinical Innovation

We are proud to announce that department chair and associate professor Kristie Patten Koenig was awarded the USC Chan Division’s 2017 Patricia Buehler Legacy Award for Clinical Innovation. Dr. Koenig was presented the award on November 14 when she presented her research on the efficacy of interventions utilized in public schools for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, with a special emphasis on applications of strength-based paradigms in inclusive settings.

Janet Njelesani Awarded Funding from Provost’s Global Research Initiative

Janet Njelesani, assistant professor in the OT department, has received funding of $10,000 from the Provost’s Global Research Initiative to establish a Global Disability-based Violence Research Group for the field of occupational therapy.
Reducing violence against persons with disabilities is a task not just for social and justice services but for the health and rehabilitation sector too. To date occupational therapy has played a limited role in this discourse. The aim is to bring together occupational therapy researchers and have an initial coordination workshop to discuss the feasibility of establishing a Global Disability-based Violence Research Group for the field of occupational therapy that aims to gather, collate, review, and carry out research to help understand, monitor, and alleviate disability-based violence.  The initial workshop will be held in Cape Town, South Africa in May 2018.


How Student Strengths Can Help Close the Autism Employment Gap

Twelve years ago, Stephen Shore was visiting Urakawa, a small town in Japan, where he met the mother of a teenage boy with autism. The boy had limited verbal skills, and his mother was worried about what kind of work he might find as an adult.

Shore, an adjunct professor in NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy, asked her the same question he always asks parents of children with autism: What is it your child likes to do?

The mother said her son liked to spend time in the basement sticking his finger under the faucet and spraying water at high pressure. There could be a number of sensory reasons why the boy enjoyed this, Shore said, including the feeling of pressure on his thumb, the joy of watching water arc across the room, or the sound of water splashing against the wall.

“And that is a gift because it tells us, ‘OK, now we know what he’s interested in: spraying water at high pressure,’” he said. “So that means considering jobs that might involve spraying water at high pressure.”

Focusing on a young person’s interests as a clue to career happiness seems like a given. When a girl shows an interest in animals, she might be encouraged to consider a future career in veterinary sciences. When a boy exhibits an interest in drawing, he may be invited to sign up for art classes. And yet, when children with autism show an interest in a subject, there can be a stigma – many times leading to their interest being labeled “restrictive” or “obsessive.”

“It’s important not to pathologize these strengths,” said Kristie Patten Koenig, an associate professor and department chair for NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy.

As an example, Koenig said her son, who does not have autism, used to talk a lot about baseball statistics and history, “but we don’t ascribe any weakness to that. We don’t say he’s obsessed or has a ‘restricted interest.’ But for kids who are on the autism spectrum, many people view it as more of a pathology or a deficit versus seeing the potential there, because of the depth of the interest.”

She said removing the pathology from these interests not only eliminates a negative stigma but allows members of the autism community to thrive in situations that capitalize on their strengths. They can be helped mentally and socially, but also occupationally.

Read the full article on our online program OT@NYU‘s blog.

Faculty Spotlight: Judy Grossman

Judy Grossman, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA, has worked in the Department of Occupational Therapy in a number of different roles, including special projects, grant writing, program development, and teaching. Her interest in interdisciplinary research and practice culminated in a multidepartment university grant that included graduate student internships and course work. In the following Q&A, Professor Grossman discusses her research specialties, the field of occupational therapy, and the OT@NYU program.

You’ve done a lot of research in the areas of early intervention and special education policy. How do you think these areas affect the clients whom clinicians serve?

I worked for a decade doing policy research for the New York State Education Department and the New York City Department of Education. This experience included principal investigator responsibilities for research proposals, advisory groups, and data collection that helped me understand the needs of families who have children in special education programs throughout the state. I understand both the macro-systems perspective and the micro-individual concerns of families.

You’ve worked extensively with at-risk populations. How do you think that has contributed to your personal and professional growth as a clinician and as a professor? What are the unique challenges or needs that these populations face?

I have always been interested in community-based prevention work, but I have expanded my activities outside the profession. Throughout my career, I have brought my OT knowledge and perspective to many positions in mental health, early intervention, and special education. At the same time, I remain committed to teaching OT students about emerging practice areas. My doctoral degree in public health and post-professional training as a family therapist have supported my professional interests, which I share as a professor.

Through your work with the Ackerman Institute for the Family External link , you support the growth and development of children and families and provide services for children with special needs. How has that shaped your outlook on that specific population, and what do you think it enables you to bring to the classroom to prepare OTs for advanced roles?

At Ackerman, I developed a team of professionals to provide services to families that have children with special needs. The services include clinical work, family therapy, group work, and interdisciplinary staff development workshops. This combination provides clinical evidence to share with students as well as issues of concern to all professionals working in the field. My team is interested in best practices in early intervention, special education, medical practice, and family support programs.

What do you think are the most prevalent challenges in the occupational therapy field today? How can clinicians address these?

The most prevalent challenges are developing evidence-based practices that are family-centered as well as an appreciation for our contribution to population health and community-based prevention services. I have long been a preventionist; thus, I have been able to track changes in the field and the emerging opportunities in health, education, and social systems. I think it’s important for OTs to widen their lens so they can think outside of the box about the unique and meaningful work we can do with at-risk populations.

From your viewpoint, how does OT@NYU prepare its students for advanced practice and leadership roles?

OT@NYU is in the unique position to promote student scholarship and refine the clinical and administrative skills that are necessary for leadership roles. Students can tailor the program to their area of interest and learn from some of the most qualified faculty in the field. My course – Promoting Family Resilience and Family-Centered Services – is offered as an elective, which speaks to the Department of Occupational Therapy’s intention to educate progressive thinkers who are well-grounded in theory, research, and practice.


Learn more about our new online program OT@NYU!