Class Notes Summer/Fall 2018

Patricia West (MA, 2000) is currently living in Southern California. She obtained her specialty certification from AOTA in feeding, eating, and swallowing about 2 years ago, with focus on the pediatric population.

Valerie Grinman (MS, 2017) has been working at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital since March 2017, primarily in acute stroke rehab. She recently became a Certified Brain Injury Specialist and is also part of a hospital-wide interdisciplinary team called the Safety Coach Program, helping to prevent workplace injuries in patients and staff.

Diane Dirette (MA ’93, PhD ’97) and Sharon Gutman (PhD ’98) are the new co-editors of the 8th edition of Occupational Therapy for Physical Dysfunction formally edited by Catherine Trombly and Mary Radomski. The new edition is scheduled to be published in 2020.

Michelle Rosenberg (MS, 2013) recently opened up a private practice in Ontario, Canada called “OT for Wellness”. She helps educate fellow occupational therapy practitioners in holistic approaches to practice, including comprehensive Yoga Instructor Certification Courses for OTs. She can be reached at MLR5085@gmail.com.

Marlene Handler, MS, OTR/L (MS, 2016) currently works in a D75 high school called the Brooklyn Transition Center, where the curriculum is designed with a focus toward basic vocational training in areas such as cooking, printing, and gardening, as well as community service. Marlene loves to integrate mindfulness and wellness strategies into her personal practice with her students to help them navigate everyday stressors.

Rick Frank (MA, 1988) has been doing OT for over 10 years part time in an outpatient rehab clinic, as part of a chronic pain management program. As part of that, he is excited to be doing some therapy sessions in a warm water pool, as well as teaching an aquatic yoga class. For the past two years he has been organizing and teaching an adaptive yoga class for people with disabilities.

Kelly Scanlon (MS, 2016) is currently a hand therapist who moved from NYC to Chicago in Jan 2018. She now works at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (Ranked 4th in US Orthopaedics). Kelly and her hand therapy colleagues will be hosting a CUE opportunity along side top ranked hand surgeons in the Nov 2018 Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush Elbow to Hand Symposium: Hand to Elbow Fractures, a Case-Based Approach to Problem Solving A 1-½ day course reviewing anatomy, surgical interventions, and treatment for fractures of the elbow, wrist, and hand.

Robbie Levy (MA, 1982) is excited to share that his business Dynamic Kids, where he is Founder and Executive Director, is celebrating it’s 20th anniversary working with the children and their families in Westchester County. NY. In addition, Robbie was presented with Westchester Magazine’s 2018 Small Business Award in a ceremony at the Crowne Plaza in White Plains on September 13, 2018.

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What’s the Most Important Part About Being an OT? OTD Student Shanteria Carr Shares Her Answer

Meet Shanteria Carr, one of our Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) students who has chosen to study in one of our newest technology-enhanced learning programs. Read on to learn about Shanteria’s path to becoming an Occupational Therapist, and what made her choose NYU Steinhardt to further her education.

What is your background and what made you decide you become an OT?

I currently reside in Washington, DC where I work as a Pediatric Occupational Therapist for the District of Columbia Public Schools. In undergrad at the University of Florida, I took a course called “Introduction to Health Professions”, where weekly, a different health professional gave a lecture to the class. It was through this course that I learned about the field of occupational therapy and the benefits the profession can provide individuals.

I began volunteering with a certified hand therapist at Shands Healthcare in Gainesville, FL. I was originally a psychology major in undergrad, however that quickly changed after a semester of volunteering with the occupational therapist. I was captivated by the interventions that were used to rehabilitate individuals to help them engage in activities after injuries. What I loved about the field was the various settings I could potentially work in, and also that I could work with individuals across the lifespan.

Although I had decided to no longer major in psychology, I was intrigued by the role psychology played within the field of occupational therapy when providing intervention to individuals. The experience from volunteering lead me to pursue a rewarding career in occupational therapy that I am forever grateful for.

What made you interested in the online OTD program at NYU Steinhardt?

I was interested in NYU Steinhardt’s online OTD program because of the flexibility the program offers. I have the ability to complete assignments around my work schedule and also select specialization courses based on my clinical areas of interest of in pediatrics and leadership. Being able to select courses based around my interests was important to me because it will allow me to further develop my skills as a clinical.

An additional advantage for me was the live classes offered through the program. I was excited about the opportunity to engage with professors and other doctoral candidates in real time because I did not want my learning to be limited through only online discussion posts or reading material.

What do you think is the most important thing OT’s do, or the most important aspect of the profession? 

As occupational therapists, our most important role is being able to collaborate with clients and their families to gather information about our clients psychological, emotional well-being and physical needs and developed intervention plans to help our clients engage in meaningful activities. Through participation in meaningful activities our clients are able to improve their quality of life and live satisfying lives. Helping clients participate in meaningful activities after they experience an injury, illness or disability is the core and the most important aspect of our profession.

NYU OT at the International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists

The 17th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) took place May 21-25, 2018 in Cape Town, South Africa. The theme of this year’s Congress was “Connected in diversity: positioned for impact.”  The Congress’ program showcased the passion for occupational therapy that is shared around the world.

New York University was fortunate to be one of six OT programs from the United States to have an exhibition booth at the Congress.  The response to the OT booth was great!  Prospective post-professional students had the opportunity to speak with faculty and staff about the online and on-campus Post-Professional OT programs at NYU. We are also happy to report that a number of NYU and NYU affiliated individuals gave well received poster and oral presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation Oral Sessions

Mariana D’Amico (Alumni)

  • Perspectives and Recommendations: Occupational Therapy and Transgender Populations

 

Rita Fleming-Castaldy (Alumni)

  • An historical analysis of occupational therapy and social activism: From settlement houses to reductionism to disability rights and occupational justice. Subtitle: Lessons learned from the profession’s first century to inform our future, enable well-being, and influence social policy

 

Siaw Chui Chai (Alumni)

  • Basics of innovation in health sciences; An overview of a new multidisciplinary course

 

Szu-Wei Chen (PhD Student)

  • Reconsidering the importance of leisure occupation in OT practice: Leisure should be an end goal of intervention

 

Kristie Patten Koenig (Chair/Faculty) and Stephen Shore (Adjunct Faculty)

  • Reframing Autism: Authentic Partnerships with Autistic Self Advocates to Guide Research, Teaching and Service Delivery

 

Chang Dae Lee

  • A Study on Validity and Reliability of Upper Extremity Performance Test for Elderly (TEMPA)

 

Anita Perr (Faculty)

  • The ConnectAbility Challenge: Design Challenge for Digital Tech

 

Presentations Poster Sessions

Rita Fleming-Castaldy (Alumni)

  • Connected in Justice: Harnessing Local Resources to Confront Social and Occupational Injustice, Empower Marginalized People, and Enable Health and Well-being Subtitle: Afya: An International Occupational Therapy Case Study in Making a Global Impact

 

Siaw Chui Chai (Alumni)

  • Grip Strength, Pinch Strength, and Manual Dexterity among Older Adults Living in Elderly Residential Care Facilities: Dominant Hand Vs Non-Dominant Hand

 

Grace Kim (Faculty)

  • An Innovative, Interdisciplinary, and Client-Centered Approach to Improve Clothing Accessibility for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Does Adherence to Instructions Affect Upper Extremity Motor Outcomes in Individuals with Stroke Using Robotics Training? 

 

Kristie Patten Koenig (Chair/Faculty) and Stephen Shore (Adjunct Faculty)

  • Reframing Autism: Authentic Partnerships with Autistic Self Advocates to Guide Research, Teaching and Service Delivery

 

Paula McCreedy (Alumni/ Former Faculty)

  • Using Storytelling in Occupational Therapy to Help Children Overcome Learning Differences and Regulatory Challenges

 

Janet Njelesani (Faculty)

  • Realization of the rights of persons with disabilities in Rwanda

 

Anita Perr (Faculty) and Kay Koch

  • Hands-on Mat Assessment and Documentation for Seating and Wheeled Mobility
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