Immersive Audio Group Records At West Point

On December 2nd, 2017, the Immersive Audio Group  traveled to Eisenhower Hall Theatre to record the West Point Military Band Holiday Show 2017. The West Point Military Band is the oldest continuously serving Army band, and the oldest unit at West Point. The Immersive Audio Group recorded at the Hudson Valley’s premiere performing arts center and worked closely with Brandi Lane on the production. A 360 video recording of the event was captured by Nokia Ozo engineer Kamal Rountree.  The group members at the recording included Ying Ying Zhang, Charles Craig Jr., Scott Murakami, Aggie Tai, Chris Neil, David Degenstein, Jason Sheng, and Ian Anderson.

The NYU Immersive Audio Group is an interest group formed by students who have a passion for 3D audio in its various forms and applications. Students in this group are encouraged to form project teams where they make their own project or collaborate on existing research, including PhD students, postdocs and professors.

If you are interested in learning more about  and/or joining the NYU Immersive Audio group, you can reach out to the members via the group’s socials:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ImmersiveAudioGroup/?fref=ts

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYideORuJs4pgx3LJTLEQQQ

Email: nyuimmersiveaudio@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Music Tech Grads Open “Corner Store Studios”

Over the past few months, recent NYU Music Technology grads Josh Liebman , Kerim Wilhelm, and Jake Zacharia opened up a production and mixing studio called “Corner Store Studios” in Brooklyn.

We caught up with Co-owner Josh Liebman to hear about his journey through Music Technology and the process of opening up a studio right out of college.

Q: Huge congrats on Corner Store Studios! Can you give me a brief description of your personal music technology background?

Josh: Thank you! I was lucky enough to go to a High school with a great music program that introduced me to production and got me started working in Logic. I started to intern at a local studio my senior year and next thing I know I was off to NYU. Since coming to the city I have interned at a number of studios including Studio G and The Cutting Room before securing my current engineering at Moon Recording and opening up Corner Store!

Q: How did you, Kerim, and Jake all get interested in wanting to open a studio together?

Josh: I was actually the last of the trio to get involved. Jake and I were in the same year and had worked together a few times and had talked more than once about doing something more formal in terms of a partnership, but nothing ever came of it. Then this past summer Jake reached out to me with the idea. The other two had started looking into spaces and that’s when Jake got in touch with me about getting involved. It wasn’t something that was really on my radar, but after thinking about it, it was really a no-brainer.

Q: What are some things that you’ve taken away from your time at NYU Music Tech that helped you accomplish what you’ve done so far with Corner Store?

Josh: Going into the space we kind of had to put everything we had learned at NYU to use. The studio was just an empty box and one of the first things we had to do was start to think about how to treat the space, and how to wire it and what kind of gear we wanted and every other tiny detail that goes into opening a studio, and it was great to feel like we actually knew what we were doing. And to this day most of my work comes from connections I have made at NYU. These connections are some of the most important things I have taken away from the Music Tech program and all of this together really makes something like Corner Store possible.

Q: What is some advice you could give to current students studying Music Technology that are interested in opening running their own studio?

Josh: Honestly, go for it. It’s something I wish I had thought of even sooner. Don’t think about trying to make it a business at first, that part will come later. But, just think about it as an investment in yourself. Having a professional space to work out of will give you the opportunity to put out better quality projects and will motivate you to work even harder at what you do. Since getting into our space, we have all been hustling to get it booked and when it’s not booked, we’ve been trying to use the time in whatever way we can to work on new projects or make the space even better.

Q: What do you see in the future for Corner Store studios and for those who are interested in your services how can they reach out to you?

Josh: For all of us, this is Corner Store version 1.0. The idea is to continue to grow this as far as it will take us. We’re only a couple months in, but the plan already is to move into a bigger space when this lease is up. We are continually looking forward with all of the decisions we are making. And to reach us, you can get in touch with anyone of us, or shoot us an email at cornerstorestudios44@gmail.com.

Stay updated with everything Corner Store Studios is up to on their socials:

Email: cornerstorestudios44@gmail.com

Facebook: Corner Store Studios

Instagram: @cornerstorestudios

 

“Calm in the Face of Global Calamities” Performed By NYU Collaborative Projects in the Performing Arts

PRESS RELEASE: NYU Collaborative Projects in the Performing Arts MPAIA-GE2031

Presents their final concert

CALM IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL CALAMITIES

BLACK BOX Theater 

82 Washington Square East                   

Sunday Dec 3, 2017 2 pm

New York University’s MPAIA-GE2031 Collaborative Projects in the Performing Arts class over the past 9 years has performed over 20 music concerts using INTERNET2. NYU has been on the frontline of these types of concert having begun this research in the 1990s.  We have collaborated with Universities in Belfast, Abu Dhabi, Norway, Sweden, Korea, China, Brazil, British Columbia, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, as well as Denver, Stanford, UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, UC San Jose, to name a few. 

The students in “Distributed Performance” are actually “Time and Space Travelers” searching for new and interesting ways to create music which can exist in spite of the latency, or in some cases because of it.  We examine various techniques and strategies to make music in this new world where a different sense of time exists at your location, at your distant collaborators location, some point in between, as well as in the presence of an audience member who is watching it streamed on line rather than being in one of the performance venues. 

The minds of participants are expanded by needing to be cognizant of the fact that a downbeat in NY might not get to the distant collaborator until beat 2 in NY, and we will not hear what the distant collaborator plays until NY plays their beat 3.  Through this use of technology, a new level of awareness is being explored and a way of navigating what the future holds for us artistically is being developed. 

The idea that, “innovation resides where art and science connect is not new. Leonardo da Vinci was the exemplar, and his drawing of the Vitruvian Man became the symbol, of the creativity that flourishes when the humanities and sciences interact.” – Steve Jobs

All pieces presented during this concert have been developed during this semester during our meetings on line with our colleagues at Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, lead by director Diego Romero Mascaró.  During these sessions we have developed various approaches to deal with the conditions while creating at a distance over INTERNET2.  During the semester we have been conscious of the painful political situation in our two countries, as well as the disregard for human life in the many man made trageties, and we present this concert to the audiences as a commentary on the recent calamities that have befallen our two countries as well as the world as a whole. 

Tom Beyer, NYU Director                           Diego Romero Mascaró, Quilmes Director

LOCATION: Black Box Theatre 82 Washington Square East
Sunday, December 3 at 2pm
ADMISSION: Free

Watch online at: stream.smusic.nyu.edu