Articulating a Strength-Based Agenda of Advocacy for Young Immigrant Children and Families

What would it mean to view young immigrant children and their families through lenses of strength, courage, promise, and possibility, instead of deficit, need, risk, and remediation? What if we, as educators, administrators, curriculum developers, policymakers, researchers, and activists, conducted our work on behalf of and with immigrant children and families with creativity, curiosity, and […]

The Costs of Equity, The Bill We Refuse to Pay: Why Integrating NYC’s Specialized High Schools Is the Right Thing to Do?

Photos of students in school hallway

On Saturday, June 2nd, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced his plan to “fix” the “diversity problem” plaguing the city’s specialized high schools. The plan by no measure is perfect, but I do believe that it can move us closer to equity in a system vexed by concentrations of privilege and the violence […]

Teacher Leadership and Advocacy for Policy, Equity, & Justice

“We’re fired up! Can’t take it no more!” This, one of the energizing rally cries for many of us who have taken to the streets to demand change, is what comes to mind when we think about the wave of recent teacher strikes, walkouts, and demonstrations across the country. The list of places where teachers […]

Advancing Equity Within and Across a System

Pencil and Paper

Much of the work of NYU Metro Center includes providing technical assistance and professional development to schools and districts around the country. This work is grounded in advancing equity and racial justice. Thus, over decades of practice-to-research and engaged evaluation work, NYU Metro Center has found a number of approaches most effective at shifting policies, […]

A Unique Opportunity for Integration, Inclusion, and Equity

Washington Square Park

The gentrification of urban neighborhoods across the country has attracted notice since at least the 1970s. However, in the most recent decade in the “return to the cities,” gentrification has become much more common. By some estimates, since 2000 nearly 20 percent of neighborhoods in the 50 largest cities have experienced gentrification. In many of […]

#BlackLivesMatter, Schooling, and The Miseducation of White People

Many of us laughed (sometimes nervously) and cringed while watching Jordan Peele’s social thriller Get Out. This fictional horror movie depicts a young Black man who goes with his White girlfriend to her family home for a weekend. What ensues is sheer revelation. It is here that we catch a glimpse at what it means […]

Floodwaters that Linger: Examining the Inequitable Impact of Natural Disasters on Vulnerable Children

As I write this, Hurricane Irma is battering Caribbean islands and is taking aim at South Florida.  Two weeks ago, Hurricane Harvey hit the Texas Gulf Coast, crippling coastal communities and creating unprecedented flooding in Houston, Beaumont, and surrounding areas. The floodwaters continue to linger, as rivers and bayous are so swollen with runoff that […]

FROM FRUITVALE TO DALLAS, FROM TRAYVON MARTIN TO MOTHER EMANUEL, FROM KENT STATE TO UNVERSITY OF VIRGINIA (Charlottesville)

When news of the terrorist attack in Charlottesville began to take center stage in our national conversation, I think I had just become numb and at the same time retroactive sensitive to all 135 instances of police abuses and bigotry against Black bodies, young Black male bodies in particular. Prior to social media telling the […]

Misuse of Data in Educational Policy

Often in education, the policy directions of school districts, state education systems, and the federal Department of Education call for and rely on the effective use of data. Such terms as “data-driven classrooms,” or “data-driven instruction” are common, and rightfully so. While the language comes from the business world, educators and policymakers alike reasonably ought […]