Diversity Council

Alisha Ali

Alisha Ali is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Psychology at New York University. Her research focuses on the mental health effects of oppression including violence, racism, discrimination and trauma. She has examined depression and its psychosocial correlates across a range of disadvantaged populations including trauma survivors, clients in poverty transition programs, psychiatric outpatient samples, and immigrant/refugee women. Her current projects are investigating empowerment-based and arts-based programs for domestic violence survivors, low-income high school students, and military veterans. She is the co-editor (with Dana Crowley Jack) of Silencing the Self Across Cultures: Depression and Gender in the Social World published by Oxford University Press.

Noel S. Anderson

Noel S. Anderson currently holds the positions of Clinical Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Director of the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Program at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development. For over 20 years, Noel has served in a variety of leadership positions. He has worked with large public school districts; charter school networks; private schools; national and international companies leading program and organizational development. Noel was recently National Senior Program Director (Chief Program Officer) for Year Up, Inc, a national workforce and education organization and was responsible for overseeing program development, innovation and quality for a growing network of over 15 cities across the country.

Noel W. Anderson utilizes print-media and arts-based-research to explore and teach philosophical inquiry methodologies. Such methodologies include but are not limited to: semiological analysis, compositional analysis, discourse analysis, deconstructive analysis, and epistemological analysis. Through a range of visual research methods – printmaking, painting, performance, and lectures – Noel primarily focuses on the function and mediation of socially constructed images on identity formation. Looking at an image’s materiality and visuality, Anderson questions the pragmatic epistemologies of identities as formed through images.

Offiong O. Aqua

Offiong O. Aqua holds a joint appointment as a Clinical Associate Professor in the departments of Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Communicative Sciences and Disorders.Born in Nigeria, he received his M.D. from the Faculty of Medicine at Friendship University, Moscow, Russia in 1986. His post-graduate training at the same University was in Facio-Maxillary Surgery. For more than a decade, he was a faculty member at Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, NY where he helped establish programs in Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, and served as Co-Chair, Department of Natural Sciences. He also served as adjunct faculty at New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York before joining the faculty at New York University.

Image of Sebastian Cherng

Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng is a sociologist whose scholarly and community-based work focuses on the social lives of marginalized youth. His interests include comparative perspectives on race/ethnicity (with a focus on China and the US), immigrant adaptation, and social capital within the school and educational context. As such, his research examines the social relationships in the lives of minority and immigrant adolescents in the US, gender and ethnic differences in education in China, and cultural and social capital transfers between adolescents in the US. His scholarship has appeared in journals such as American Educational Research Journal, Educational Researcher, Social Forces, and Social Science Research. Cherng received his doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania and Bachelor’s from MIT, and he has taught in a public middle school in San Francisco and a college in rural China.

Fabienne Doucet

Fabienne Doucet is an Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education and Program Leader for the programs in Childhood Education in the department of Teaching and Learning at the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. She is also an affiliated faculty member of the NYU Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools, Institute for Human Development and Social Change, and Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Born in Spain, raised in Haiti, and migrating to the U.S. at the age of ten, Doucet embodies a hybrid identity that is mirrored in her interdisciplinary approach to examining how immigrant and U.S.-born children of color and their families navigate education in the United States. A critical ethnographer, Doucet specifically studies how taken-for-granted beliefs, practices, and values in the U.S. educational system position linguistically, culturally, and socioeconomically diverse children and families at a disadvantage, and seeks active solutions for meeting their educational needs. Doucet has a Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from the UNC-Greensboro and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Education with fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation.

Carlos A. Chirinos Espin

Carlos A. Chirinos Espin’s work explores innovation and creativity in emerging global music industries, looking at the role of music in public health, international development and social change. He has been a key consultant for radio and music projects in Europe, Africa and Japan, with funding from the World Bank, USAID, IDRC, the Wellcome Trust and Toyota Foundation. He was awarded the Director’s Teaching Prize at SOAS, University of London in 2009. Currently, Professor Chirinos collaborates with the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, curating music performances to engage the Latin community living in New York City. He is also involved in projects in the UK, Tanzania, Cuba and other countries, looking at the role of music industries in economic development, tourism and social entrepreneurship.

Associate Dean Flores

Stella M. Flores is Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Diversity and Associate Professor of Higher Education at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She is also Director of Access and Equity at the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy at NYU. Dr. Flores holds an EdD in administration, planning, and social policy from Harvard University, an EdM from Harvard University, an MPAff from The University of Texas at Austin, and a BA from Rice University. In her research she employs quantitative methods to examine large-scale databases, grades K through 20, to investigate the effects of state and federal policies on college access and completion rates for low-income and underrepresented populations. Dr. Flores has written about demographic changes in U.S. education, the role of alternative admissions plans and financial aid programs in college admissions in the U.S and abroad, Minority Serving Institutions, Latino and immigrant students, English Language Learners, and community colleges. Her publications include various peer-reviewed articles in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Educational Researcher, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, American Journal of Education, The Review of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, The Journal of Mixed Methods, The Journal of College Admission, The Future of Children, and The Journal of Hispanics in Higher Education, as well as three co-edited volumesHer co-authored work (with Catherine L. Horn) has been cited in the 2003 U.S. Supreme Court Gratz v. Bollinger decision (dissenting opinion) and in various amicus briefs submitted to the Supreme Court on affirmative action cases in higher education admissions. Professor Flores serves on the editorial boards of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, The Review of Higher EducationSociology of Education, and the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness and AERA Open. 

Nija Monét Leocadio

Nija Monét Leocadio is a Brooklyn, NY native, where her immediate family still resides. Her formal education began at home and continued in the NYC Public School system through the 12th grade.She attended Barber-Scotia College, a small liberal arts Historical Black College (HBCU) in Concord, NC Carolina, where she became the first female president of the Student Government Association, as well as involved with The Rotary Club and Greek Life. She graduated with degrees in Elementary Education and Sociology, and worked in the private sector until May 2006. While assessing colleges in North Carolina for her younger sister, Nija was hired as a Residence Hall Director at Saint Augustine’s University) in Raleigh, NC. There, she discovered her passion for working with college-aged students and for the duration of her tenure at St. Aug, Nija advised many organizations including the National Pan-Hellenic Council and Tri-State Club. In 2013, Nija returned to New York, where she received her M. A. in Higher Education and Student Affairs from New York University. During her matriculation, she interned for the Community College Transfer Opportunity Program (CCTOP), a scholarship and assistance program for students transferring from partnering community colleges to Steinhardt. Nija’s work with CCTOP sparked her interest in diversity and access. Currently, she is a graduate student services counselor in the office of Student Affairs at NYU Steinhardt. In this role, she has developed a networking series and professional development workshops which focus on the importance and various strategies of networking. Further, Nija also advises the Graduate Student Organization, a dynamic group of young adults dedicated to being the voice of the graduate community. Helping people is essential to her being, and so she uses this zealous energy to work with college students, of all ages, to discover their passions and live within it.

Usheevii King

Usheevii King is Associate Director for Faculty Development and Diversity at NYU Steinhardt where she works on professional development opportunities and resources for faculty in areas such as diversity & inclusion; teaching and technology; disseminating faculty research and artistic work to broader audiences, and other areas that promote faculty success. Further, she also works with departments and faculty to build more effective mentoring and networking opportunities for junior and underrepresented faculty.

Charlton D. McIlwain

Charlton D. McIlwain is an Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. His recent work focuses on the intersections of race, digital media, and racial justice activism. He recently wrote Racial Formation, Inequality & the Political Economy of Web Traffic, in the journal Information, Communication & Society, and co-authored, with Deen Freelon and Meredith Clark, the recent report Beyond the Hashtags: Ferguson, #BlackLivesMatter, and the Online Struggle for Offline Justice, published by the Center for Media & Social Impact, and supported by the Spencer Foundation. He is currently working on a book Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter, forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

Mara Mills

Mara Mills works at the intersection of disability studies and media studies. Her research and teaching interests include communication history (especially related to telephones and reading practices), science and technology studies, disability theory, and mobile media studies. Her book On the Phone: Hearing Loss and Communication Engineering, forthcoming from Duke University Press, argues the significance of phonetics and deaf education to the emergence of “communication engineering” in early twentieth-century telephony. This concept and set of practices later gave rise to information theory, digital coding, and cybernetics. Mills is currently working on the history of optical character recognition and, with Jonathan Sterne, she is co-authoring a book titled Tuning Time: Sequences from the History of Time Stretching and Pitch Shifting. With John Tresch, she co-edited a special issue of Grey Room on “Audio/Visual.” With Rebecca Sanchez, she has also co-edited a new edition of And No Birds SingPauline Leader’s memoir about life as a deaf working-class runaway among the bohemians of Greenwich Village in the 1920s (Gallaudet University Press 2016, reviewed on H-Disability).

Mara Mills works at the intersection of disability studies and media studies. Her research and teaching interests include communication history (especially related to telephones and reading practices), science and technology studies, disability theory, and mobile media studies. Her book On the Phone: Hearing Loss and Communication Engineering, forthcoming from Duke University Press, argues the significance of phonetics and deaf education to the emergence of “communication engineering” in early twentieth-century telephony. This concept and set of practices later gave rise to information theory, digital coding, and cybernetics. Mills is currently working on the history of optical character recognition and, with Jonathan Sterne, she is co-authoring a book titled Tuning Time: Sequences from the History of Time Stretching and Pitch Shifting. With John Tresch, she co-edited a special issue of Grey Room on “Audio/Visual.” With Rebecca Sanchez, she has also co-edited a new edition of And No Birds SingPauline Leader’s memoir about life as a deaf working-class runaway among the bohemians of Greenwich Village in the 1920s (Gallaudet University Press 2016, reviewed on H-Disability).

Joe Salvatore

Joe Salvatore is a playwright and director and has been on the faculty of the Program in Educational Theatre at NYU since Fall 2002. He teaches courses in ethnodrama, ethnoacting, new play development, applied theatre, and dramatic literature, and serves as the director of Steinhardt’s Verbatim Performance Lab. Joe’s most recent work, in collaboration with Maria Guadalupe (INSEAD-France), is called Her Opponent, an ethnodramatic re-staging of excerpts of the 2016 presidential debates with gender-reversed casting. The Off Broadway production of the project was nominated for an Off Broadway Alliance Award for Best Unique Theatrical Experience and has been covered by the New York Times, the Guardian, Teen Vogue, The Hollywood Reporter, out.com, Breitbart, Rush Limbaugh, Fox News, MSNBC, and ABC News, among others. Other plays and performance projects include Full City+ with Keith R. Huff, Jenny Macdonald’s solo play ENTHRONED (Dublin’s First Fortnight Festival, 2016 New York International Fringe Festival), ga(y)ze (with Troy Hourie and Caleb Teicher on 14th Street, NYC), Animating the James and Ann Whitall House at Red Bank BattlefieldTowards the FearBromancing the OK (Part of Torrent Theatre’s Mindflood, NYC), “Like” Like (part of Hall Pass in NYC and San Diego), Mother’s Milk (part of Play/Date at NYC’s Fat Baby), open heart (FringeNYC, 2010), and fag / hag (with Kate Nugent, FringeNYC, 2000). His play IIIreceived the Overall Excellence Award for Outstanding Play from FringeNYC (2008) and was subsequently published in Best American Short Plays 2008-2009 (Applause Books). His academic publications include the chapter “Ethnodrama / Ethnotheatre” in Handbook of Arts-Based Research, edited by Patricia Leavy (Guilford Press). While teaching at NYU, Joe has received the University’s Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Faculty Award, NYU Steinhardt’s Teaching Excellence Award, and the NYU LGBTQ Student Center’s Dedication to Education Award. He is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America and the American Alliance for Theatre and Education and an alumnus of the Lincoln Center Directors Lab.

Gustavo Ariel Setrini

Gustavo Ariel Setrini is Assistant Professor at NYU’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health. A political scientist who studies sustainable agriculture and rural development, his research examines the opportunities and constraints that global markets offer for small farmers in developing countries. His recently completed book, Beyond Labels: How Local Institutions Shape Global Value Chains, studies the how Fairtrade and organic certification shape local development and small farmer organizations in Paraguay. He is also co-author of Looking Behind the Label: Global Industries and the Conscientious Consumer (Indiana University Press 2015). His research has also examined the role of small farmers organizations in supporting inclusive economic development in the Peruvian organic produce export industry and the Dominican Republic’s cocoa industry. He is currently coordinating an impact evaluation of the US Agency for International Development’s Inclusive Value Chain Project in Paraguay, utilizing Random Control Trail methodology.

Frances King Stage

Frances King Stage is Professor of Administration, Leadership, and Technology at New York University. She earned her B.S. at the University of Miami and her M.S. at Drexel University, both in Mathematics. Her Ph.D. is from Arizona State University in Higher Education. Her research specialization includes college student learning, especially for STEM disciplines and student participation in math and science majors. Recent work has focused on characteristics of undergraduate institutions that produce unexpected levels of students who go on to earn STEM doctorates. She also studies college access and success for underrepresented students. Stage has over 150 publications, most focusing on college students and the methods used to study them. Her books include, Answering Critical Questions Using Quantitative Data, and Research in the College Context: Approaches and Methods. Stage is past Vice President for the Postsecondary Education Division (J) of the American Educational Research Association and has won awards for research and scholarship from the Association for the Study of Higher Education and the American Educational Research Association. She spent 1999-2000 as a Senior Fellow at the National Science Foundation and was a Fulbright Specialist at the University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica in 2008 and at the University of West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados in 2011. Before moving to NYU in 2000, she was Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. She has directed more than 40 doctoral dissertations to completion.

Lisa M. Stulberg

Lisa M. Stulberg is associate professor, sociology of education, at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Her research focuses on the politics of race and education, affirmative action in higher education, school choice policy and politics, and LGBTQ social change. She is the author of Race, Schools, and Hope: African Americans and School Choice after Brown (Teachers College Press, 2008) and the co-editor (with Eric Rofes) of The Emancipatory Promise of Charter Schools: Toward a Progressive Politics of School Choice (SUNY Press, 2004). She is the co-editor (with Sharon Lawner Weinberg) of Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach (Routledge, 2011). She currently is working on a book with Anthony S. Chen, of Northwestern University, on the origins of race-conscious affirmative action in college admissions. She has a forthcoming (2018) book with Polity called LGBTQ Social Movements. She blogs for Huffington Post Queer Voices. She received an A.B. from Harvard College, a Masters in Social Science (M.Soc.Sci.) in Cultural Studies from the University of Birmingham (in the U.K.), and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California at Berkeley.

Natalie Zwerger

Natalie Zwerger is Director of the Center for Strategic Solutions, an equity and racial justice center, dedicated to promoting and sustaining equity in the classroom and beyond. Ms. Zwerger is a facilitator in the NYU Knowledge Partners program, part of the campus diversity, equity and inclusion initiative. Ms. Zwerger has provided professional development and technical assistance to educators from PreK to college across the country, including Puerto Rico. A former teacher in the Bronx, Ms. Zwerger has 15 years of experience as an educator and advocate for children’s rights. Prior to her work with NYU, Ms. Zwerger worked with the Office for Civil Rights ensuring compliance with civil rights laws, and for several non-profits supporting youth who were victims of abuse and neglect or had contact with the crime processing system. In addition to being a licensed attorney, she is a licensed teacher in New York State.