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Schedule

MIAS 2019 Institute - The Reconciliation Of American Diversity With National Unity

Sample Syllabus and Programming: 

Saturday, June 8

All day

Arrival and check-in at Palladium.

Sunday, June 9

Morning

Unpack and catch up on sleep.

1:00-2:30 PM

Administrative Orientation Meet MIAS staff in the Palladium lobby at 12:45pm.

2:30-5:30 PM

Tour of Union Square, NYU and Washington Square.

I. LOCAL AUTONOMY AND PLURALISM IN AMERICA

Monday, June 10

8:30 AM

Meet in Palladium lobby to walk over to 246 Greene Street.

9:00 AM- 12:00 PM

NYU Card Center, 7 Washington Place Bank of America, 770 Broadway Administrative Tasks, 246 Greene Street

1:00-2:30

Bobst Orientation, Bobst Library Room 743 with Michelle Demeter

5:00 PM

Meet in the Palladium lobby to walk over to 246 Greene Street.

5:30-7:30 PM

Opening Reception Meet with other NYU officials, faculty, and graduate students. 1st Floor, Pless

Tuesday, June 11

9:30-11:00 AM

Reconciliation of Diversity with National Unity Speaker: Philip Hosay, Professor of International Education, and Director of the Multinational Institute of American Studies, NYU Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

11:00-12:00PM

Tour of NYU – Led by MIAS Staff

12:00-2:00PM

Lunch (on your own)

2:00-3:30 PM

Discussion of Research Interests There will be a roundtable discussion over lunch in which the participants will be able to present how the study of the US is approached in each of your countries. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

6:00-9:00 PM

Museum Mile Festival (free and optional): Join the crowds listening to live music and visiting museums for three hours during Museum Mile Festival on 5th Avenue (from 82nd to 105th Street). This year's participating institutions include: El Museo Del Barrio, Museum of the City of New York, the Jewish Museum, Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, Neue Galerie New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Assigned Reading

Thomas Bender, "Strategies of Narrative Synthesis in American History," American Historical Review (February 2002): 129-153; David Levering Lewis, “Exceptionalism's Exceptions: The Changing American Narrative,” Daedalus (Winter 2012): 101-117; Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln (2006), chps. 1-5, 10-11.

Recommended Reading

Gary Wills, Explaining America (1981), 1-93 ; William H. Chafe, “The American Narrative: Is There One & What Is It?” Daedalus (Winter 2012): 11–17; Alexis De Tocqueville, Democracy in America, ed. Richard D. Heffner, pp. 49-58, 95-142, 189-220, 289-317; Stephen H. Sumida, “Where in the World is American Studies,” American Quarterly 55, no.3 (2003): 333-351

Wednesday, June 12

9:30-11:15 AM

Politics and Democracy in Early America Speaker: Andrew Robertson, Professor of History, Lehman College and CUNY Graduate Center. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

2:00-5:00 PM

Film Viewing Wim Wenders’ Land of Plenty. Bobst Library, 7th floor immersion viewing room.

7:00–10:00 PM

New York Philharmonic (free and optional) Great Lawn, Central Park, Manhattan Eastside entrances: East 79th or 85th Streets at Fifth Avenue Program: Rossini, Overture to La Gazza Ladra; Copland, Hoe-Down, from Rodeo. and Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 Jaap van Zweden, Conductor

Assigned Reading

James Merrell, “The Cast of His Countenance: Reading Andrew Montour” in Ronald Hoffman, Mechal Sobel, and Fredrika Teute, eds., Through a Glass Darkly: Reflections on Personal Identity in Early America (1997), 13-39; David J. Silverman, "Indians, Missionaries, and Religious Translation: Creating Wampanoag Christianity in Seventeenth-Century Martha's Vineyard," Archives of American Art Journal 23, no.4 (1983): 27- 33; Joseph S. Wood, “‘Build, therefore, your own world:’ The New England Village as Settlement Ideal,” The Annals of the Association of American Geographers (March, 1991).

Recommended Reading:

Simon Middleton, “’How it Came that the Bakers Bake No Bread’: A Struggle for Trade Privileges in Seventeenth-Century New Amsterdam,” William and Mary Quarterly (2001), 347-72; Jane Landers, “Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose: A Free Black Town in Spanish Colonial Florida,” American Historical Review, 95 (1990); Sumner C. Powell, Puritan Village: The Formation of a New England Town (1963), chps. 5-l0.

Thursday, June 13

9:30-11:15 AM

The Search for Community in the American Imagination Speaker: Rene Arcilla, Professor, Philosophy and Humanities Education, NYU. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

11:30-1:30 PM

Lunch, New England Trip Briefing

2:00-3:45 PM

The Constitutional Basis for Equality and Universal Rights in America Speaker: Thomas Halper, Professor, Political Science, Baruch College, City University of New York Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene St

Assigned Reading

Richard Rorty, Achieving Our Country (1998); Sacvan Bercovitch, The Rites of Assent: Transformations in the Symbolic Construction of America, ch. 10; Leonard W. Levy, "The Original Meaning of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment," in Religion and the State: Essays in honor of Leo Pfeffer, ed. James E. Wood, Jr. (1985); Daniel Boorstin, The Americans: The National Experience (1965), 325-390; 37-63; Dworkin, Ronald, "Affirmative Action: Does it Work?" and "Affirmative Action: Is it Fair?" in Sovereign Virtue: The Theory and Practice of Equality (2002);

Recommended Reading

Mary Ann Villarreal, “Finding Our Place: Reconstructing Community through Oral History,” The Oral History Review (Summer–Autumn, 2006): 45-64; Vicki L. Ruiz, “Citizen Restaurant: American Imaginaries, American Communities,” American Quarterly (March 2008): 1-21; Noah Feldman, " From Liberty to Equality: The Transformation of the Establishment Clause ," California Law Review (May 2002): 673-731; Richard J. Arneson, “Perfectionism and Politics,” Ethics (Oct., 2000), pp. 37-63.

Friday, June 14-Sunday, June 16

Community, Equality and Liberty in New England
You will meet at the Palladium Lobby on Friday at 6:45AM to take the train to Boston. This tour will be led by Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng, Co-Director of the summer institute and Assistant Professor of International Education, NYU. We will be staying in Boston Club Quarters Hotel. On Friday evening and Saturday afternoon, you will be free to visit such sites as the Museum of Fine Arts, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Copley Place, the Bunker Hill Monument, the USS Constitution. Saturday morning will include a historical tour of Boston, which examines early examples of democratic governance and how economic change undermined the social cohesiveness of the first settlements. That evening you will attend a dinner hosted by Dr. Mitalene Fletcher, Director of Pre K-12 and International Programs at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and an alumna of the NYU International Education doctoral program. On Sunday morning, you will tour Harvard University. In the afternoon you will depart by train for New York. The focus of this tour will the meaning of community and democratic equality in New England.

Recommended Reading

William Cronon, Changes in the Land (1983), pp. 159-170; Norman Ware, The Industrial Worker (1924), pp. 1-25; Tuyet-Lan Pho, “Southeast Asian Women in Lowell: Family Relations, Gender Roles, and Community Concerns,” Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies, vol. 24, no. 1 (2003), pp. 101-129.

II. INDIVIDUAL LIBERTY AND THE AMERICAN CREED

Monday, June 17

9:00AM- 12:00PM

Individual Research

2:00-4:00 PM

Electronic Media, Censorship, and Individual Privacy Panel discussion moderated by Tiffany Hsu, journalist, New York Times. Panelists include: Kitty Bridges, Associate Vice President, IT Policy & Compliance, NYU; Norman Siegel, attorney and former Executive Director of the New York Civil Liberties Union;; Leonid Litvin, Vice President, Development and Associate Corporate Counsel, RTB Exchange. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

7:00–9:00 PM

Metropolitan Opera Summer Recital (free and optional): Enjoy the Met’s popular summer concert series through this recital that showcases three exciting young artists: soprano Leah Hawkins, tenor Mario Bahg, and baritone Joseph Lim, with Dimitri Dover on piano. This evening’s concert will take place at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens.

Assigned Reading

Robert Faris and Bruce Etling,“Madison and the Smart Mob: The Promise and Limitations of the Internet for Democracy,” The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs (Summer 2008): 65-85; Nathaniel Persily, “Can Democracy Survive the Internet?” Journal of Democracy, Volume 28, Number 2, April 2017, pp. 63-76.

Recommended Reading

William Banks, "State Responsibility and Attribution of Cyber," Texas Law Review (June, 2017); Evgeny Morozov, “Wither Internet Control?” Journal of Democracy, Volume 22, Number 2, April 2011, pp. 62-74.

Tuesday, June 18

9:30-11:15 AM

American Federalism and Local Governance Speaker: Scott Minkoff, Professor, Department of Politics, SUNY New Paltz Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

2:00-4:00 PM

Individual Research

6:00-10:00 PM

Human Rights Watch Film Festival (When We Walk) New Yorker Jason DaSilva is facing the life-changing decision of whether to relocate to Austin, Texas to be closer to his young son who has moved with his mother following their recent divorce. Facing a rapidly progressing form of multiple sclerosis and experiencing a swift decline in his motor skills, Jason soon learns that the harsh restrictions of the US Medicaid system would prevent him from accessing the services he needs to live life as fully as possible, and from being the dad he wants to be for his young son. Left with this heart-aching choice, When We Walk, the follow-up to DaSilva’s Emmy Award-winning film When I Walk, reflects on Jason’s own childhood and relationship with his father, making his fight to keep his son resonate even more powerfully.

Assigned Reading

Daniel J. Elazar, "Opening the Third Century of American Federalism: Issues and Prospects," The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (May 1990); Gordon S. Wood, “Review: Federalism from Bottom Up,” The University of Chicago Law Review, 78.2 (Spring, 2011), 705-732; Stella Burch Elias, “The Perils and Possibilities of Refugee Federalism,” American University Law Review, 66.2 (2017), 353-414.

Recommended Reading

The Federalist Papers, nos. 10, 78, 81; Timothy J. Conlan, “Federalism and policy instability: Centralization and decentralization in contemporary American federalism,” Revue française de science politique (English Edition), Vol. 64, No. 2, pp. 27-48; Robert Inman and Daniel Rubinfeld, “Rethinking Federalism,” The Journal of Economic Perspectives 11, no.4 (Autumn 1997), 43-64.

Wednesday, June 19

9:30-11:30 AM

Religious Liberty and the American Creed Panel discussion moderated by Gabriel Moran, Professor Emeritus of Religion and Philosophy of Education, NYU. Panelists include Robert Seltzer, Professor of History, Hunter College, CUNY; Xavier Prickett, Visiting Assistant Professor, Program in Religious Studies, NYU; Donna Schaper, Senior Minister, Judson Memorial Church Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

1:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

8:00-10:00 PM

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo at Central Park (free and optional): Part of City Parks Foundation’s Summerstage series, this performance of an all-male comedy ballet company will feature classic works from a unique, modern perspective.

Assigned Reading

Robert Putnam and David Campbell, American Grace: How Religion Unites and Divides Us (2010); chs. 1-2, 8-9, 11, 14-15; Randall Balmer, “Under Trump, America's religious right is rewriting its code of ethics” The Guardian, 18.1. 2018; Pew Research Center, “More Americans now say they’re spiritual but not religious,” 9.6. 2017, see: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/06/more-americans-now-say-theyre-spiritual- but-not-religious; PRRI (Public Religion Research Institute), “America’s Changing Religious Identity,” 6.9.2017.

Recommended Reading

Winthrop S. Hudson, " Liberty , Both Civil and Religious," in The Lively Experiment Continued, ed. Jerald Brauer (1988); Anthony Gill and John M. Owen IV, “Religious Liberty and Economic Prosperity: Four Lessons from the Past,” Cato Journal, Winter

2017; Karen Leonard, “American Muslims and Authority: Competing Discourses in a Non- Muslim State,” in John J. Bukowczyk, ed., Immigrant Identity and the Politics of Citizenship (2016).

Thursday, June 20

9:30-11:15 AM

American Business Enterprise, Globalization, and International Trade Speaker: Thomas Pugel, Professor of Economics and Global Business, Stern School of Business, NYU Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene.

1:00-4:00 PM

Lower Manhattan: Tour of Wall Street, the World Trade Center, and the World Financial Center. Accompanied by Dr. Julian Brash, Associate Professor of anthropology at Montclair State University. He is an expert on urban development and politics, economic development policy, The High Line Park (NY), architecture and design, public space, and Michael Bloomberg’s tenure as Mayor of New York.

7:00 - 10:00 PM

The Archway Ten-Year Anniversary Party (free and optional): This free event celebrates ten years of the Dumbo Archway in Brooklyn. Performances include site-specific dance by WHITE WAVE Young Soon Kim Dance Company (6:30 p.m.) and music by the Brown Rice Family (7:30 p.m.) as well as Jan Bell and the Maybelles (9:00 p.m.). There will be art and photo exhibits all night and food and drink available for purchase.

Assigned Reading

Joseph Stiglitz, The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers our Future (2012), chs. 1, 4, 5; Sven Beckert, “History of American Capitalism,” in American History Now, ed. Eric Foner and Lisa McGirr (2011), 314-335; David Ciepley, “Beyond Public and Private: Toward a Political Theory of the Corporation,” American Political Science Review 107, no. 1 (2013),139-158; Benjamin Waterhouse, “The Corporate Mobilization against Liberal Reform: Big Business Day, 1980,” in What's Good for Business: Business and American Politics since World War II, ed. Kim Phillips-Fein and Julian E. Zelizer (2012), 233- 248; Mitchell Moss,“The Redevelopment of Lower Manhattan: The Role of the City,” in John Mollenkopf, Contentious City: The Politics of Recovery in New York City (Russell Sage Foundation, 2005); Richard E. Ocejo, Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), Conclusion.

Recommended Reading:

Jeffrey Sklansky, “The Elusive Sovereign: New Intellectual and Social Histories of Capitalism,” Modern Intellectual History (2012), 233–48; Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business (Cambridge: Harvard University Press/Belknap Press, 1977), 209-283; Mary A. O’Sullivan, “Funding New Industries: A Historical Perspective on the Financing Role of the U.S. Stock Market in the Twentieth Century,” in Financing Innovation in the United States, 1870 to the Present, ed. Naomi R. Lamoreaux and Kenneth L. Sokoloff (2007), 163-216; Bethany Moreton, To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (2009), 24-35, 49-66; Martin Filler, “New York’s Vast Flop,” The New York Review of Books, March 9, 2017; Julian Brash, “Downtown as Brand, Downtown as Land: Urban Elites and Neoliberal Development in Contemporary New York City,” in Marina Peterson and Gary W. McDonogh, ed., Global Downtowns (2012).

Friday, June 21

9:30-11:15 AM

Organized Labor in America Speaker: William A. Herbert Distinguished Lecturer and Executive Director, National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene.

2:00-4:00 PM

Poverty in America: Social Responsibility and Individual Self-Reliance Panel discussion moderated by Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng. Members of the panel are; Jeremy Reiss, Deputy Officer for Public Policy and External Relations, Henry Street Settlement; Natalie Brito, Assistant Professor of Applied Psychology, NYU; Jacob Faber, Assistant Professor at NYU’s Wagner School of Public Policy. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

8:00 - 10:00 PM

Broadway Show (required): “Oklahoma!” at the Circle in the Square Theatre

Assigned Reading

Larry Bartels, Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age (2008), chps. 1-3, 5, 9; Melvyn Dubofsky, Hard Work: The Making of Labor History (2000), 100-173; Jennifer Klein, "We Were the Invisible Workforce: Unionizing Home Care" in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, ed. Dorothy Sue Cobble (2007); James T. Patterson, America's Struggle Against Poverty in the Twentieth Century (2000), pp. 171-184, 210-223; Stone et al. “A Guide to Statistics on Historical Trends in Income Inequality,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (Oct 2015); U.S. Census Bureau, Income and Poverty in the United States: 2015 (September, 2016); “New Census Data Shows More Americans Emerging From Poverty,” The Atlantic, September 12, 2017

Recommended Reading

Eric Foner, "Why is There No Socialism in the United States?" History Workshop Journal 17 (Spring 1984); Stephanie Luce, “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: A Labor Day Assessment of the Past Year,” New Labor Forum (Fall 2012): 66-73; Tayyab Mahmud, “Debt and Discipline,” American Quarterly (September 2012), 469-494; Marianne P. Bitler and Hilary W. Hoynes, “The State of the Social Safety Net in the Post- Welfare Reform,” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity (Fall 2010), 71-127; Elvin Wyly, C. S. Ponder, Pierson Nettling, Bosco Ho, Sophie Ellen Fung, Zachary Liebowitz, and Dan Hammel, “New Racial Meanings of Housing in America,” American Quarterly (September 2012), 571-604; Josh Bivens, et al. “Raising America’s Pay: Why It’s Our Central Economic Policy Challenge,” Economic Policy Institute (June 4, 2014)

Saturday, June 22 - Sunday, June 23

Free Weekend

As this is one of only two free weekends in the program, the participants can choose to catch up on reading, do some shopping, rest, go to the beach, or visit museums. There are endless options of museum exhibits, concerts and other activities going on in NYC in the summer, which can be consulted at TIME OUT (https://www.timeout.com/newyork) and the NYC official events website (www.nycgo.com). Below is a list of just a few free museum exhibits.

  • June 22nd: 2:00- 3:30 pm. Union Square: Crossroads of New York Walking Tour at Barnes & Noble, Manhattan. Experience Union Square in a new way by participating in the Union Square Partnership's free walking tour - Union Square: Crossroads of New York.
  • June 22nd: Picnic in the park:Bring your own food, wine, and table decorations to Prospect Park Soiree. Tickets includes chairs at a table, live jazz from the Big Band Era, and a DJ dance party for age 21+. Festive attire and hats are welcome. Read the location page carefully.
  • June 22nd: Mermaid Parade: The Mermaid Parade has 1000 people wearing glittery semi-nude costumes, floats with aquatic themes, and classic cars that drive east along Surf Avenue, and then west along the boardwalk on Coney Island in Brooklyn. Expect crowds. Free.
  • June 22nd, 12:00pm-5:00pm: Essex Street Market Block Party: Essex Street Market - Block Party has 15 food vendors, pushcarts, live music, and kids’ activities on Essex Street (from Delancey to Rivington). Free.
  • June 22nd: BAM Film Festival
  • June 23nd: 2:00- 3:30 pm. Central Park Tour: Stroll to Strawberry Fields at Columbus Circle Information Kiosk (in Central Park), Manhattan.
  • June 23rd: Native American Festival: Drums Along the Hudson features traditional dance, drumming, crafts, and foods at Inwood Hill Park, plus performers representing other cultures. Free
  • June 23rd: 6:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. Summer on the Hudson: Let's Dance! at Pier I (in Riverside Park South), Manhattan. Learn to dance like a pro at these Salsa, Cha-Cha and Bachata lessons and group social dances led by master teachers.

Museum exhibitions

  • Admission to the Metropolitan Museum of Art is $25 for adults and $12 for students, for those visiting NY. For current exhibits, see: http://www.metmuseum.org/ Admission to the
  • American Museum of Natural History in general is “pay what you wish”; special exhibits may have a fee. For current exhibits, see: http://www.amnh.org/
  • Admission to the National Museum of the American Indian is free. For current exhibits, see: http://www.nmai.si.edu/visit/newyork/
  • The Museo del Barrio is free every third Saturday of the month (June 17th) for Super Sábado, with additional events. See: http://www.elmuseo.org/
  • Saturdays at the Guggenheim Museum are also “pay what you wish” from 5:45 to 7:45 pm. A line forms at 5:15. See: https://www.guggenheim.org/plan-your- visit#admission
  • The Tenement Museum offers highly recommended neighborhood immigration tours and is located at 103 Orchard Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan (see the website at www.tenement.org for more details).
  • The Brooklyn Museum is free after 5 pm on the first Saturday of every month, with additional concerts and activities. See: https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/visit/first_saturdays
  • The American Folk Art Museum is free and open from 11:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays and 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Sundays. https://folkartmuseum.org/
  • The African Burial Ground tells the story of enslavement in New York City’s colonial history. Admission is free, and the visitor center and outdoor memorial are open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays.

III. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL HETEROGENEITY

Monday, June 24

9:30-11:15 AM

Immigration and Cultural Conflict Speaker: Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng, International Education, NYU Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

1:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Movie in the Park--Bryant Park (movie to be announced) (free and optional) 

Assigned Reading

Lawrence H. Fuchs, The American Kaleidoscope (1990), pp. 1-34, 384- 404; Pew Research Center, “Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States,” (May 3, 2017); Pew Research Center, “Key Findings about US Immigrants “(November 30, 2018); NAS (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine), “Summary” of The Economic and Fiscal Consequences of Immigration (The National Academies Press: Washington, DC. 2017).

Recommended Reading

David R. Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class (1999), chps. 1 and 7; Ronald H. Bayor, "Another Look at 'Whiteness': The Persistence of Ethnicity in American Life," Journal of American Ethnic History (Fall 2009), pp. 13-30; William Julius Wilson, The Declining Significance of Race (1978), pp. 155-182; David M. Reimers, Unwelcome Strangers: American Identity and The Turn Against Immigration (1998), chps. 1-3.

Tuesday, June 25

9:30 AM- 2:00 PM

The Ethnic Community in America Tour of the Lower East Side and Chinatown with Philip Hosay and Sebastian Cherng. The walking tour will include a history of SoHo, the Jewish Lower East Side, Little Italy, and end with lunch in Chinatown. The focus of this tour will be the tension between the process of assimilation and the formation of an ethnic identity.

2:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

6:00-8:00 PM

Midsummer Night Swing (optional): Midsummer Night Swing begins with a lesson in swing, tango, salsa, etc., followed by a live band in Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center. 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, Manhattan.

Assigned Reading

Jacob Riis, How The Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York (1890), pp. 1-16, 82-102; Nga-Wing Anjela Wong, “‘They See Us as Resource:’ The Role of a Community-Based Youth Center in Supporting the Academic Lives of Low- Income Chinese American Youth,” Anthropology & Education Quarterly (Jun., 2008), 181- 204; Joel L. Swerdlow, “New York’s Chinatown,” National Geographic (August, 1998); Deborah Dwork, “Immigrant Jews on the Lower East Side of New York, 1880-1914," in Jonathan Sarna, ed., The American Jewish Experience (1986), pp. 120-35

Recommended Reading

Andrew S. Dolkart, Biography of a Tenement House in New York City: An Architectural History of 97 Orchard Street; Hasia R. Diner, Lower East Side Memories: A Jewish Place in America (2002); Philip Q. Yang, “Sojourners or Settlers: Post- 1965 Chinese Immigrants,” Journal of Asian American Studies (February 1999), pp. 61-91; Ernesto Qui̜ onez, Bodega Dreams (2000); Laurie Fabiano, Elizabeth Street (2010); Vivian Louie, Compelled to Excel: Immigration, Education, and Opportunity among Chinese Americans (2004), chps 3, 5, 8.

Wednesday, June 26

9:30-11:15 AM

Recreating Community: The Black Migration from Farm to City Speaker: Gunja SenGupta, Professor, History Department, Brooklyn College, CUNY. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

1:00-4:00 PM

Diversity in Harlem Walking tour of Harlem led by R. L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy, Professor, Sociology of Education, NYU. Focus is on landmarks indicating its history as the most important African American community, both politically and culturally, in the United States. The tour will also examine the recent gentrification of Harlem.

7:30 – 9:00 PM

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival (free and optional): Hear Afro-Cuban pianist Chucho Valdés with Jazz Batá and Cuban percussionist Dafnis Prieto with his Si o Si Quartet in Brooklyn's Prospect Park. Gates open at 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Located at the Prospect Park Bandshell, 9th Street & Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY.

Assigned Reading

Nicholas Lemann, The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America; Violet M. Showers Johnson. “’What, Then, Is the African American?’ African and Afro- Caribbean Identities in Black America.” Journal of American Ethnic History 28, no. 1 (Fall 2008); Edward E. Curtis, “Islamism and Its African American Muslim Critics: Black Muslims in the Era of the Arab Cold War.” American Quarterly (2007), 683-709; Michael Henry Adams, “The End of Black Harlem,” New York Times, May 27, 2016; Jorge Duany, “Reconstructing Racial Identity: Ethnicity, Color, and Class among Dominicans in the United States and Puerto Rico,” Latin American Perspectives (May, 1998), pp. 147-172; Lawrence Bobo and Camille Charles, “Race in the American Mind: From the Moynihan Report to the Obama Candidacy,” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (2009).

Recommended Reading

Bridget R. Cooks, “Black Artists and Activism: Harlem on My Mind (1969),” American Studies, Volume 48, Number 1, Spring 2007, pp. 5-39; Michael Dunne, “Black and White Unite? The Clinton-Obama Campaigns in Historical Perspective,” The Political Quarterly (Jul-Sep 2008); Sally Howell and Andrew Shryock, “Crashing Down on Diaspora: Arab Detroit and America’s ‘War on Terror,’” Anthropological Quarterly (Summer 2003); Kavita Nandini Ramdas, “Leveraging the Power of Gender and Race,” The Nation (February, 21, 2008); Taeku Lee, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow? Post-Racial & Pan-Racial Politics in the Age of Obama,” Dædalus (Spring, 2011).

Thursday, June 27

10:00-12:00 PM

Pluralistic Integration in Queens Tour led by Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng. You will meet with Susan Tanenbaum, Director of Immigrant and Intercultural Affairs for Queens, as well as other government officials at the Queens Botanical Gardens, and also participate in a task force on immigration and integration. Queens is one of the most ethnically diverse middle class neighborhoods in the United States, home to a largely immigrant population from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Korea, China, the Philippines, the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Mexico, Argentina, and a host of other countries.

12:00-2:00PM

Lunch, New Mexico Trip Briefing, and Program Evaluation

2:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

7:00–9:00 PM

Hip Hop Concert (free and optional): The Duck Down hip hop label holds an annual barbecue in Betsy Head Park in Brooklyn. This year’s cookout is hosted by members of the seminal Brownsville, Brooklyn clique—Black Moon (Enta Da Stage, “Who Got The Props?”) and Smif-n-Wessun (aka Cocoa Brovaz), boom-bap OGs who helped define a 90s soul & jazz-sampling NYC rap sound that continues to be mined for inspiration by generations of New York rappers. 

Assigned Reading

Roger Sanjek, The Future of Us All: Race and Neighborhood Politics in New York City (1998), chps. 10-11, 15, conclusion; Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum, International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train (2017).

Recommended Reading

R. Scott Hanson, City of Gods: Religious Freedom, Immigration, and Pluralism in Flushing, Queens (2016); Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan, Crossing the BLVD: Strangers, Neighbors, Aliens in a New America (2003); Matthew Thomas, We Are Not Ourselves (2014).

Friday, June 28 - Wednesday, July 3

Ethnicity and Assimilation on the American Frontier: Tour of Colorado and New Mexico, led by Mickey Bronstein and Jia-Lin Liu. Following your arrival in Denver, you will travel directly to Colorado Springs, where you will stay at The Antlers Wyndham Hotel. The next morning you will have a lecture and discussion with Professor Santiago Guerra, Professor of Southwest Studies and core faculty in Race and Ethnic Studies at Colorado College. Afterwards you will visit the Pioneer Museum and tour the Garden of the Gods Nature Center and Park. In the evening there will be a group dinner at the Cactus Flower Mexican Restaurant in Pueblo, Colorado. On Sunday morning, you will travel Taos, New Mexico, where you will stay at the El Monte Sagrado Hotel. Following lunch, you will have a guided tour of the Taos Pueblo, Afterwards you will visit the Millicent Rogers Museum’s collection of contemporary Native American art and Spanish-New Mexican art. Following this, you will stop briefly at the Rio Grande Gorge, from which you can view the Rio Grande River 650 feet below On Monday morning you will meet with the Governor of the Santa Clara Pueblo, J. Michael Chavarria, who will discuss the governing structure and economy of the northern pueblos. He will then take you to the Puye Cliff Dwellings, a National Historic site, where you will have lunch prepared by the Pueblo. After lunch you will visit Bandelier National Monument. On Tuesday you will go to Cañon City, Colorado. In the afternoon you will take a train tour of the Royal Gorge region. On Wednesday, following breakfast, you will travel to the Denver airport for the trip back to New York. The focus of this tour is patterns of ethnic confrontation and assimilation on the Western frontier.

Recommended Reading

Willa Cather, Death Comes for the Archbishop; Gerald D. Nash and Richard W. Etulain, eds. “Mexican Americans In the New West” and “Indians of the Modern West,” in, The Twentieth-Century West (1989); Ramon Gutierrez, “The Pueblo Indian World in the Sixteenth Century,” in David Hackett, ed., Religion and Culture: A Reader (1995); Anthony F. C. Wallace, The Long, Bitter Trail (1993), pp. 30-49; Manuel Gonzales, Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States (1999), chps 7, 9; Charles Montgomery, “The Trap of Race and Memory: The Language of Spanish Civility on the Upper Rio Grande,” American Quarterly (September 2000), pp. 478-513.

Thursday, July 4

10:00AM- 4:00PM

Free time for reading and research

4:00-6:00 PM

July 4th: Celebration of American Pluralism Among the activities in which the participants can take part is the Independence festival at the South Street Seaport. This is also an excellent day to explore other parts of Brooklyn, like Prospect Park, or other parts of Manhattan, like Battery Park. Many New Yorkers choose to spend July 4 walking around the city. The focus of this day will be how Americans celebrate both pluralism and national unity.

9:00-10:00 PM

Fireworks (free and optional): Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks, East River. Staff will meet the participants at the Palladium lobby and take them to a place where they can view the fireworks along Manhattan’s midtown on the East Side.

Recommended Reading

Ralph H. Gabriel, The Course of American Democratic Thought (1956), pp. 99-104, 315-318, 439-450; Homer Calkin, “The Centennial of American Independence ‘Round the World,’” Historian (1976); Robert Andrews, “The Real American Independence Day?,” New-England Galaxy (1975); Ray Privett, “Independence: An Intercultural Experience in North America,” The Drama Review (2000).

Friday, July 5

9:30-11:15 AM

English Language Learning and American Schools Heather Woodley, Professor of Language Education, Department of Teaching and Learning, NYU Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

2:00-4:00 PM

Ethnicity, Race, and Gender in American Politics Panel moderated by former New York State Assemblyman Daniel Feldman, Professor of Public Management at John Jay College. Panelists include Galen Kirkland, Executive Director, Center for War/Peace Studies, and former New York State Commissioner of Human Rights; Alyson Cole, Executive Officer and Professor of Political Science, Women & Gender Studies, and American Studies at Queens College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

6:00-8:00 PM

Contemporary Dance Performance (free and optional): Watch some of New York City’s best dance companies perform their latest works at Bryant Park. 

Assigned Reading

Ryuko Kubota and Angel Lin, “Race and TESOL: Introduction to Concepts and Theories,” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Sep., 2006), pp. 471-493; Jennifer McCloud, “Just Like Me”: How Immigrant Students Experience a U.S. High School,” The High School Journal, Volume 98, Number 3, Spring 2015, pp. 262-282;Joshua A. Fishman, “Is a Fuller Relinguification of TESOL Desirable?” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 2 (June 2009), pp. 313- 317; Lily Wong Filmore, “English Language Learners at the Crossroads of Educational Reform,” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 48, No. 3, (September 2014), pp. 624-632; Laura R. Winsky Mattei, “Gender and Power in American Legislative Discourse, The Journal of Politics, (May, 1998), pp. 440-46; Gary Jacobson, “The Triumph of Polarized Partisanship in 2016: Donald Trump's Improbable Victory,” Political Science Quarterly (Spring, 2017), pp. 9-41; Pew Research Center, “An Early Look at the 2020 Electorate,” January 30, 2019.

Recommended Reading

 Jim Cummings, “Multilingualism in the English-language Classroom: Pedagogical Considerations,” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 43, No. 2 (June 2009), pp. 317-321; Nelson Flores, “The Unexamined Relationship Between Neoliberalism and Plurilingualism: A Cautionary Tale” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 47, No. 3, (September 20113), pp. 500-520; Avik Roy and John Yoo, “The Republican Party Needs Asian Voters,” The National Interest, March 7, 2019; George C. Bunch, Aída Walqui P. David Pearson, “Complex Text and New Common Standards in the United States: Pedagogical Implications for English Learners,” TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 48, No. 3, (September 2014), pp. 533-559 Bruce Baum, “Donald Trump’s ‘Genius,’White Natural Aristocracy,’ and Democratic Equality in America,” Theory & Event, Volume 20, Number 1, January 2017 Supplement, pp. 10-22; Gregory Smith and Jessica Martinez, “How the faithful voted: A preliminary 2016 analysis,” Pew Foundation (November 9, 2016).

Saturday, July 6 - Sunday, July 7

Free Weekend

See the List of free Weekend Activities for a complete list of free museum exhibits and events. In addition, here are some suggestions for this weekend:

  • RCTA Summer Concert Series (free, at the Riverside Clay Tennis Association, in Manhattan's Riverside Park at approximately 96th Street). Stop by the RCTA in Riverside Park for free music, picnic, and dancing in the grass. On July 6, Spanish classical guitarist Francisco Roldán will delight with a variety of virtuosic guitar playing.
  • Summer on the Hudson: Amplified Sundays (free, Pier I in Riverside Park South, 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.) Enjoy vibrantly-danceable live music accompanied by spectacular sunsets over the Hudson River! This evening’s concert will be put on by Aztec Sun, offering an upbeat retro groove steeped in ‘70s funk and soul.
  • Visit Central Park: Paddle boats and gondola rides can be rented/purchased at the Loeb Boathouse, which provides beautiful views of the Bethesda Fountain, from 10am- 6pm, daily (take the 4,6 from Union Square to 86th Street and the boathouse is approximately off of 74th in the middle of the park). There will also be free concerts in the park both days as part of the SummerStage program.
  • You may enjoy a scenic trip to popular Governor’s Island to try out their new hammock grove, famous array of food trucks, or to take in the unique views of Manhattan.

IV. NATIONAL UNITY: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL INTEGRATION

Monday, July 8

9:30-11:30 AM

Education and American Society Panel discussion moderated by Adriana Villavicencio, Assistant Professor, University of California, Irvine and Deputy Director, Research Alliance for New York City Schools. Members of the panel include: Rashida Hilliard, Teacher, the Town School, and formerly high school Spanish and ESL teacher in Brooklyn; Luis Rodriguez, Assistant Professor of Education Leadership, NYU; Merav Ben-Nun, Teacher, Harlem Hebrew Language Academy Charter School, and founder of Hand in Hand bilingual Jewish- Arab Integrated School in Haifa, Israel. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

1:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

6:30-9:00 PM

Bryant Park Movie Night (free and optional): Bring a blanket and sit on the Lawn to enjoy an outdoor screening of Carrie (1976), a classic American film starring Sissy Spacek, directed by Brian De Palma, and written by Stephen King (novel). The lawn opens at 5:00 p.m., and the film begins at sunset. 

Assigned Reading

Bernard Bailyn, Education in the Forming of American Society (1960); Daryl Michael Scott, “Postwar Pluralism, Brown v. Board of Education, and the Origins of Multicultural Education,” The Journal of American History 91, no. 1 (June 2004); Richard Neumann, “American Democracy in Distress: The Failure of Social Education,” Journal of Social Science Education, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Spring 2017); Steven Fesmire, “Democracy and the Industrial Imagination in American Education,” Education and Culture, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2016), pp. 53-61; Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo. "Globalization, immigration, and education: The research agenda," Harvard Educational Review 71, no. 3 (2001): 345-366.

Recommended Reading

 Lawrence Cremin, Popular Education and Its Discontents (1990), pp. 1-50; Richard J. Murnane and John P. Papay, “Teachers’ Views on No Child Left Behind: Support for the Principles, Concerns about the Practices,” Journal of Economic Perspectives, (2010), 151-166; Andrew Hartman, “A Trojan Horse for social Engineering: The Curriculum Wars in recent American History,” Journal of Policy History, Volume 25, Number 1, 2013, pp. 114-136.

Tuesday, July 9

9:30-11:15 AM

American Popular Culture and Consumerism Speaker: Daniel Flamberg, Managing Director, Publicis Kaplan Thaler Group. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

2:00-4:00 PM 

Mass Culture, the Media, and American Politics Panel discussion moderated by Neil Hickey, Adjunct Associate Professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and former editor at large of the Columbia Journalism Review. Members of the panel are: John Pavlik, Professor of Journalism and Media Studies, Rutgers University; Eli Bleich, Professor of Politics, NYU and former campaign manager for various politicians; Ralph Engelman, Senior Professor, Department of Journalism & Communication Studies, Long Island University; Joe Peyronnin, Professor of Journalism, NYU, and producer for CBS News, Fox News and Telemundo/NBC News. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

6:00-7:00 PM

Yoga in the Park (Bryant Park) Join local community members for free outdoor yoga in Bryant Park. Mats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Assigned Reading

Lizabeth Cohen, “From Town Center to Shopping Center: The Reconfiguration of Community Marketplaces in Postwar America,” The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 4 (Oct., 1996), pp. 1050-1081; Guiliz Ger and Russell W. Belk “I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke: Consumptionscapes of the "Less Affluent World,’’’ Journal of Consumer Policy (September 1996); W. Lance Bennett, “The Personalization of Politics: Political Identity, Social Media, and Changing Patterns of Participation,” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (November 2012), 20-39; Joel Simon and Alexandra Ellerbeck “The president’s phantom threats,” Columbia Journalism Review (Winter 2018).

Recommended Reading

Richard Butsch, The Making of American Audiences: From Stage to Television, 1750-1990 (2000), pp. 158-294; Yoichi Shimemura, “Globalization vs. Americanization: Is the World Being Americanized by the Dominance of American Culture?” (2002), Comparative Civilizations Review, no. 47; John Sides, Michael Tesler, Lynn Vavreck, “How Trump Lost and Won,” Journal of Democracy, Volume 28, Number 2, April 2017, pp. 34- 44; Marvin Kalb, Enemy of the People: Trump's War on the Press, the New McCarthyism, and the Threat to American Democracy ( 2018), pp. 149-156.

Wednesday, July 10

9:30-11:15 AM

The Rise of the Middle Class and Suburbanization Speaker: Daniel Walkowitz, Professor, History, NYU. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

11:30 AM

Group Photo in Washington Square Park

1:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

7:00-10:00 PM

Broadway Show (required): “Hillary and Clinton” at the John Golden Theater

Assigned Reading

Kenneth Jackson, Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States (1987), pp. 3-11, 116-218; Pew Research Center, “The Lost Decade of the Middle Class: Fewer, Poorer, Gloomier,” (August, 2012); LeRoy Ashby, With Amusement For All: A History of American Popular Culture Since 1830 (2006), pp. 302-340; John Bodnar, “Saving Private Ryan and Postwar Memory in America.” The American Historical Review 106, no. 3 (June 2001).

Recommended Reading

 Stuart M. Blumin, The Emergence of the Middle Class: Social Experience in the American City (1989), pp. 1-18, 138-229; Robyn Muncy, “Cooperative Motherhood and Democratic Civic Culture in Postwar Suburbia, 1940-1965.” Journal of Social History 38, no. 2 (2004): 285-310.

Thursday, July 11

9:30-11:30 AM

Interest Group Politics and the National Interest Panel discussion moderated by Ellis Henican, Columnist and Political Analyst for CNN. Members of the panel are: Alyshia Galvez, Professor of Latin American Studies, Lehman College, CUNY; Jonathan Friedman, Project Director, Campus Free Speech, PEN America; Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

12:00-2:00 PM

Washington DC Trip Briefing, and Lunch

2:00-4:00 PM

Individual Research

6:30 - 8:30 PM

Jazz at Socrates (free and optional): Jazz at Socrates presents world-class musicians in free concerts at Socrates Sculpture Park on each second Thursday throughout the summer. This evening, enjoy a concert honoring the late Dr. Randy Weston by longtime members of his touring group, helmed by its musical director, the renowned saxophonist and flautist T.K. Blue, and featuring Alex Blake (bass), Neil Clarke (percussion), Vince Ector (drums), and Sharp Radway (piano). Socrates Sculpture Park is located in Queens.

Assigned Reading

Richard L. Hall, Alan V. Deardorff, “Lobbying as Legislative Subsidy,” American Political Science Review (February 2006), 69-83; John W. Kingdon, Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies (1995), pp. 48-74, 152-172; Nelson Polsby and Aaron Wildavsky, Presidential Elections: Strategies of American Electoral Politics (1988), pp. 1-42;

Kristin Goss, “Policy Plutocrats: How America’s Wealthy Seek to Influence Governance,” PS: Political Science & Politics, Volume 49, Issue 3, July 2016; Yascha Mounk, The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It (2018), chps. 3, 6, 7; William A. Galston, “The Populist Challenge to Liberal Democracy,” Journal of Democracy (April 2018).

Recommended Reading

 Kenneth R. Mayer, “Public Election Funding: An Assessment of What We Would Like to Know,” The Forum: A Journal of Applied Research in Contemporary Politics Volume 11, Issue No. 3 (October 2013), p. 365-384; Marie Hojnacki and David C. Kimball, “The Who and How of Organizations' Lobbying Strategies in Committee,” The Journal of Politics (Nov., 1999), pp. 999-1024; Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, How Democracies Die (2018).

Friday, July 12

9:30-11:15 AM

American Foreign Policy and Public Diplomacy Speaker: Arthur Zegelbone, retired Foreign Service Officer, and Adjunct Professor, International Education,NYU. 3rd Floor Conference Room, 246 Greene Street

12:00-2:00 PM

Baseball Practice in Central Park

7:00-11:00 PM

Baseball (required) - New York Yankees vs. Toronto Blue Jays

Assigned Reading

Charles Frankel, The Neglected Aspect of Foreign Affairs: American Educational and Cultural Policy Abroad (1953), pp. 67-110; Nancy Snow, “International Exchanges and the U.S. Image,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 616, (Mar., 2008), pp. 198-222; Nicholas J. Cull, “Public Diplomacy: Taxonomies and Histories,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 616, (Mar., 2008), pp. 31-54; Joseph Nye, “The 21st Century will not be a Post-American World,” International Affairs Quarterly, March 2012; Keren Yarhi-Milo, “American Foreign Policy in the Trump Era,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 97, No. 1 (January/February 2018), pp. 68-77.

Recommended Reading

 Richard Arndt, The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the Twentieth Century (2005), pp. 161-287; Joseph S. Nye, “Public Diplomacy and Soft Power,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 616 (Mar., 2008), pp. 94-109; Kenneth A. Osgood, “Hearts and Minds: The Unconventional Cold War,” Journal of Cold War Studies, Vol. 4, no. 2, Spring 2002, 85-107; Sean Duggan, “Redefining the Relationship: Reclaiming American Public Diplomacy from the US Military in Iraq,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 66, No. 1 (Winter 2012), pp. 53-78; Kristin Lord, “Voices of America: U.S. Public Diplomacy for the 21st Century,” (Brookings Institution, November, 2008).

Saturday, July 13 - Monday, July 15

The Democratic Process and National Unity: Tour of Washington, D.C. led by Sebastian Cherng and Philip Hosay. You will depart via train on Friday morning. After checking into the hotel, you will have the early afternooon free to tour the area around the White House and the National Mall. In the early evening, you will attend an informal barbecue dinner at the house of Philip Hosay’s daughter and son-in-law, Marcea and Paul Barringer. Marcea is a Senior Consultant for the Federal agency that regulates affordable housing, and Paul is a Senior Vice-President of one of the nation’s largest health insurance companies. On Sunday morning, you may elect to observe a religious service at the Shiloh Baptist Church, a prominent and politically active African-American congregation in Washington, or visit the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. During the afternoon, accompanied by MIAS staff, you will be free to visit the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the Vietnam Memorial, the Holocaust Museum, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial, the East Wing of the National Gallery of Art, etc. On Monday morning, you will have a tour of the Capitol, after which you will meet with officials in the DOS Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs for a debriefing. You will then take the train back to New York. In Washington, you will stay at the Mayflower Hotel. The focus of this tour is the nature of the democratic process in America and how it differs from democratic practices in other countries. .

Recommended Reading

 Gordon S. Wood, “Democracy and the Constitution,” in Robert A. Goldwin and William Schambra, eds., How Democratic is the Constitution, pp. 1-17; Larry J. Sabato, The Rise of Political Consultants: New Ways of Winning Elections, pp. 302-337; William H. Hansell, Jr., “A Common Vision for the Future: The Role of Local Government and Citizens in the Democratic Process,” National Civic Review (Fall 1996); P.S. Martin, “Voting’s Rewards: Voter Turnout, Attentive Publics, and Congressional Allocation of Federal Money,” American Journal of Political Science (January 2003), pp. 110-127.

Tuesday, July 16

10:00AM- 12:00PM

New York Architecture, Urban Design and Community Planning Tour of midtown Manhattan, and lecture by Carol Krinsky, Professor of Art History, NYU. The tour will begin at Grand Central Terminal, the handsome and brilliantly-planned privately-owned railroad building that restructured midtown in the 20th century. It continues past skyscrapers built on the railroad’s land, following the introduction of zoning rules that restricted the pursuit of competitive profit. The tour ends at Rockefeller Center, a group of commercial buildings that is recognized as one of the world’s finest urban complexes. While much of what they will see is striking and beautiful, the city results primarily from commercial ambitions, aided by engineering and tempered by law. The architects and artists who designed the buildings responded to the interests of businessmen, the result of which was a very American skyline.

1:00-5:00 PM

Individual Research

7:00 –8:30 PM

Riverside Summer Organ Series (free and optional): Riverside’s annual series features some of the world’s most outstanding organists performing on The Riverside Church’s famed Aeolian-Skinner pipe organ, one of the most magnificent instruments of its kind. This evening, hear Alcee Chriss, the first-prize winner of the Canadian International Organ Competition.

Assigned Reading

William H. Jordy, “The Impact of European Modernism in the Mid- Twentieth Century,” American Buildings and Their Architects, VOL. 4 pp. 1-83; Carol Krinsky, “Midtown Tour.”

Recommended Reading

 Neil Harris, Building Lives (1999), chps. 1, 3; Norval White, New York: A Physical History (1987), pp. 111-129.

Wednesday, July 17

9:30-11:30 AM

Postmodernism in America Panel moderated by Stacy Pies, Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU. Other panelists include Alicia Ostriker, Professor Emerita of English at Rutgers University, Chancellor of the American Academy of Poets, and the New York State Poet; Mark Spicer, Professor of Music at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center; and Janet Zarish, Professor and Head of Acting, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU.. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

1:00-3:00 PM

Whitney Museum A guided tour of modern art related to prominent American social themes. The focus will be on American modernism.

6:30-8:00 PM

Film Screening “Art and Revolution in Cuba.” New York Public Library, Seward Park (192 East Broadway) (free and optional) To commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution, we will be screening two documentary films from our collection, placing particular emphasis on the complex relationship between aesthetic expression and collective politics. These primary documents give us a rare glimpse of the people and culture of Cuba at the peak of its revolutionary transformation. 

Assigned Reading

Ann Douglas, “Periodizing the American Century: Modernism, Postmodernism, and Postcolonialism in the Cold War Context,” Modernism/Modernity (September 1998), 71-98; Richard Pells, “Modernism in Europe and America,” Modernist America: Art, Music, Movies, and the Globalization of American Culture (Yale University Press, 2011), pp. 1-27; Robert Rosenblum. On Modern Art (1999), pp.62-71; Frascina and Charles Harrison, Modern Art and Modernism. A Critical Anthology (1982), pp.93-104; Barnett Newman, “The First Man was an Artist.” and “The Sublime is Now,” in Charles Harrison and Paul Wood, Art in Theory 1900-1990: An Anthology of Changing Ideas (2002), pp. 566-69, 572-74.

Recommended Reading

 Marianne DeKoven, “Utopias Limited: Post-sixties and Postmodern American Fiction,” Modern Fiction Studies (Spring 1995), 75-97; Harold Bloom, “Introduction” to Don DeLillo, White Noise (2002 edition); Maxwell Anderson, “Foreword” to Lisa Phillips, The American Century: Art and Culture, 1950-2000 (2000); Jonathan Fineberg, Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being (2000); Annie E. Coombes, "Museums and the Formation of National and Cultural Identities," in Preziosi and Farago, eds., Grasping the World: The idea of the museum (2004), pp. 278–298.

Thursday, July 18

10:00 AM- 12:00 PM

Diversity and Experimentation in American Music Performance and lecture by Joel Sachs, Director, Contemporary Music, The Juilliard School, and Director of Continuum. Location: The Juilliard School, Room 560.

1:00-3:00 PM

Participant Research Discussion Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Summer on the Hudson: Everybody Tango! (free and optional) Enjoy introductory Argentine Tango lessons, music, and dancing in the open air. At On the Pier (in West Harlem Piers), Manhattan. 

Assigned Reading

New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians “Charles Ives,” (2001), vol. 19, pp. 424-452; Michael Nyman, Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond (Music in the Twentieth Century (1999), Introduction, chps. 1, 3; James Pritchett, The Music of John Cage (1993), chps. 3-4; Judith Tick, Ruth Crawford Seeger: A Composer's Search for American Music (1997), Part VI.

Recommended Reading

 Burton Peretti, “Speaking in the Groove: Oral History and Jazz,” Journal of American History, Vol. 88, No. 2 (Sep., 2001), pp. 582-595; Roy Shuker, Understanding Popular Music (1994), chps. 1, 6; Lewis A. Erenberg, "Things to Come: Swing Bands, Bebop, and the Rise of a Postwar Jazzscene" in Lary May, ed., Recasting America: Culture and Politics in the Age of Cold War (1989), pp.221-245.

Friday, July 19

9:30-11:30 AM

American Exceptionalism in the Age of Globalization Roundtable discussion of participants and MIAS staff led by Philip Hosay. Conference Room, 3rd floor, 246 Greene Street.

12:00-2:00 PM

Lunch Discussion: Program Evaluation

7:00-10:00 PM

Concluding Celebration Dinner and party at the home of Cynthia and Philip Hosay, 755 West End Avenue, where you will receive a “Certificate in American Studies” from the New York University Multinational Institute of American Studies.

Assigned Reading

Seymour Martin Lipset, American Exceptionalism: A Double-Edged Sword (1996), chps. 1-3, 8; Alice Kessler Harris, “Social History,” in Eric Foner, ed. The New American History (1990); Shelley Fisher Fishkin, “Crossroads of Cultures: The Transnational Turn in American Studies,” American Quarterly 57.1 (2005) 17-57.

Recommended Reading

 Lawrence W. Levine, Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America (1990), pp. 169-242; Heinz Ickstadt, “American Studies in an Age of Globalization,” American Quarterly 54.4 (2002) 543-562.

Saturday, July 20 or Sunday July 21

Departure for home – date of departure depends on international travel arrangements