Current Course Details

Please check Albert or the Registrar's Office site for the most up-to-date class meeting times, locations, and call numbers. The courses will be open in Albert; there is no need to contact the Department directly. Albert wait lists will be available for all courses. Please email us with any additional questions.

MCC Graduate Courses Summer and Fall 2018

SUMMER 2018

MCC-GE 2165.099 Transnational Communities and Media Cultures - BERLIN
Summer Session I: May 28 - June 9, 2018

Professor: Radha Hegde

Participants travel to Berlin to examine recent patterns of migration and the role of media in redefining culture and national belonging.  Site visits will explore Berlin as a global city with a focus on the culture and identity of diasporic communities.  Discussions and lectures will dissect the role of media and technology as it relates to cultural politics, nationalism, and various aspects of immigrant lives.

Please find more information, including details on how to apply, here: https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/global/programs/Transnational_Communities_Germany 

FALL 2018

MCC-GE 2001.001 Media, Culture, and Communication Core Seminar
Professor: Martin Scherzinger
Wednesdays 11:00-1:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Core Requirement

Examines theoretical approaches that are central to the study of media, culture, and communication. provides students with a historical and critical framework for understanding the literature and research traditions within the field of media studies with an emphasis on media and communication as institutional actors, technological artifacts, systems of representation and meaningful cultural objects.

MCC-GE 2001.002 Media, Culture, and Communication Core Seminar
Professor: Martin Scherzinger
Wednesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Core Requirement

Examines theoretical approaches that are central to the study of media, culture and communication. Provides students with a historical and critical framework for understanding the literature and research traditions within the field of media studies with an emphasis on media and communication as institutional actors, technological artifacts, systems of representation and meaningful cultural objects.

MCC-GE 2001.003 Media, Culture, and Communication Core Seminar
Professor: Helga Tawil-Souri
Mondays 11:00-1:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Core Requirement

Examines theoretical approaches that are central to the study of media, culture and communication. Provides students with a historical and critical framework for understanding the literature and research traditions within the field of media studies with an emphasis on media and communication as institutional actors, technological artifacts, systems of representation and meaningful cultural objects.

MCC-GE 2005.001 The Psychic Life of Media
Professor: Ben Kafka
Wednesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Visual Culture and Cultural Studies, Technology and Society

"Our writing tools are also working on our thoughts," Nietzsche supposedly declared à propos his typewriter. This claim has been used by Friedrich Kittler and others to argue for a version of media studies based on "media-technological determinism." This course will consider how various Freudian and post-Freudian psychoanalytic concepts might be used to critique this position, or at least provide it with greater nuance. Readings vary from semester to semester.

MCC-GE 2112.001 Politics of the Gaze: Sensory Formations
Professor: Allen Feldman
Mondays 4:55-7:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Media Institutions and Politics

The meditation and technological development of vision and its dominance over the human sensorium is integral to the emergence of the modern, including experiences of urbanism, consumer desire, gender/sexual identities, race and ethnicity, trans-cultural image systems, aesthetic production, and the making of power and political truth claims. This seminar will focus on introducing participants to the core theories and analytic methods of visual culture, and the socio-political history of the human sensorium in a variety of disciplines, including ethnography, social history, urban studies, cinema studies, social geography, material culture studies, and media studies.

MCC-GE 2135.001 Media, Memory, and History
Professor: Marita Sturken
Thursdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Visual Culture & Cultural Studies, Interaction & Social Processes

This course examines the relationship of visual media to historical narratives and cultural memory. It looks at photography, film, television, and forms of new media in relation to theories of historiography and cultural memory.

MCC-GE 2148.001 The Television Business
Professor: David Poltrack
Thursdays 6:00-9:15 PM | 4 credits
NOTE: This course meets for 9 sessions only. The dates are September 6, 13, 20, 27 October 4, 11, 18, November 1, 8. 
MA Area of Study: Research Course

Exploration of the technical, legal, and economic structures including broadcast television, cable television, the internet and mobile.  Examination of the consequences of these structures on the content and social effects of mass media.  The focus will be on the programming and advertising structure of this evolving television business and how that structure is evolving with the 3-screen convergence of television, the internet, and mobile.

MCC-GE 2153.001 Media Activism: Decolonizing Media Studies
Professor: Nicholas Mirzoeff
Tuesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Technology and Society, Media Institutions and Politics

Decolonizing media studies is to engage media from the perspective of the global South, whether in that South or looking to the North. In this optic, the “object” of that study is not the dominant media forms of racial capitalism but decolonial action and organizing. Following Fanon’s understanding that colonialism in the imperial metropole is fascism, the focus in the North becomes antifascism. This workshop will look at histories of racial capitalism, decolonial methodologies and specific case studies to develop this analysis. Its goal in short to engage with the ongoing dynamics of undoing the mediation of settler (neo)colonialism, from Standing Rock to Palestine and South Africa. The seminar is open to all, without preconditions, without hierarchy and without guarantees.

MCC-GE 2167.001 Transnational Media Flows
Professor: Juan Piñon
Mondays 2:00-4:10 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Global & Transcultural Communication

This class will study the global landscape of media flows, particularly television and film, and its specific configurations at regional and national levels. Rooted in the idea of media as cultural industries we will identify the supranational regional players from some of the most important geo-linguistic markets around the world, where the tensions of global/transnational media and cultural audience's dynamics at local levels become more evident. We will examine the implications of these industrial/cultural dynamics from both theories that denounce the homogenizing cultural effect produce by global media, as well as approaches that underscore the rising of counter-flow trends based on audiences' preferences.

MCC-GE 2174.001 Professional Writing and Research Applications
Professor: Kari Hensley
Tuesdays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Culminating Experience

This course is meant to integrate skills and knowledge acquired duringthe master’s program to achieve a professional level of competency inseveral areas:  writing for professional journals or websites;developing survey or other instruments for data production; surveyingthe scholarly literature; writing scholarly abstracts; understandingthe processes of self-editing and peer reviewing; and giving polishedoral presentations of final writing and/or web-based projects.

MCC-GE 2182.001 Communication Processes: Gender, Race & Cultural Identity
Professor: Deborah Borisoff
Wednesdays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Interaction & Social Processes

Course examines past & current studies on language, communication theories, speech perception, & other aspects of verbal & nonverbal behavior. Students relate these studies to how gender, race, culture & sexual orientation are developed & reflected in society in both personal & professional relationships.

MCC-GE 2200.001 Media Events and Spectacle
Professor: Sal Fallica
Mondays 4:55-7:05 PM | 4 credits
MA Area of Study: Media Institutions and Politics, Visual Culture & Cultural Studies

This course examines the role played by media events and spectacle in the shaping of belief, attitudes, and actions, with particular attention paid to the concept of the masses and its changed meaning over time. The course examines concepts of mass culture, the decentralization of cultural forms, and the rise of convergence culture. It explores the history of the media event and the theories that have shaped it, and the role of spectacle in society from the Renaissance to modern society to the age of digital media.

MCC-GE 2900.001 Thesis in Media, Culture, and Communication
Professor: Susan Murray
Tuesdays 2:00-4:10 PM | Variable Credit
MA Area of Study: Culminating Experience

This course is designed to foster and support your thesis-writing process. Ours is a thesis-based seminar that serves as a writing workshop: we will write in class together, you will draft portions of your thesis, you will give and receive feedback on your writing. This class will also offer professional development for students interested in academic careers. Students apply research methodologies, engage in peer-reviewing and oral presentations, and develop their writing for academic journals. The Thesis course is open to MCC MA students with approved permission code only. MCC students should contact their primary adviser for registration instructions.

MCC-GE 2901.001 Theoretical Synthesis for Research, Writing, and Teaching
Professor: Rodney Benson
Mondays 11:00-1:10 PM | Variable Credit
MA Area of Study: Culminating Experience

This course will develop students’ ability to synthesize key theories & concepts in the study of media, culture, & communication, through the mapping of conceptual fields & development of syllabi aimed at core theories & individual research areas, drawing out relationships—logical, epistemological, historical, & methodological between relevant concepts, theories, schools of thought, & subdisciplines.

DOCTORAL STUDENTS ONLY:

MCC-GE 3100.001 Doctoral Core Seminar I
Professor: Arvind Rajagopal
Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 pm | 4 credits

Advanced reading and discussion of the foundational literature, principles, and paradigms associated with the study of media, culture, and communication.

MCC-GE 3112.001 Special Topics in Cultural Studies, TOPIC: What is the Social
Professor: Erica Robles-Anderson
Mondays 2:00-4:50 PM | 4 credits

What is the Social?
Social media, social networks, social costs, social animals, social imaginaries, socio-technical systems, socio-materiality – the twenty-first century seems curiously over-described as ‘social’. This course asks, “why?” Drawing on empirical, methodological, and theoretical works we’ll dig into ‘the social’ as a category. We’ll discuss its history as a political (and pre-political) project. We’ll think about how people have tried to study it, and how these attempts shape what we know. With our newly expanded view, we will try to make sense of the stakes and politics underlying projects to expand (or relocate) ‘the social’ to media, animals, and things.

MCC-GE 3150.001 Special Topics in Technology Studies: Computation and Culture
Professor: Angela Wu
Wednesdays 2:00-4:50 PM | 4 credits

Computation and Culture

This course is designed to contribute toward knowledge foundation and conceptual sensitivity for comprehending our culture’s ongoing “algorithmic turn.” In industry, “big data analytics” identify patterns in human behavior with aims of intervening in human processes. In academia, “computational social science” is emerging as a fast expanding interdisciplinary field garnering attention and resources. The boundary in-between has become porous. This course examines these recent developments. In addition to working through cultural and historical texts on algorithms and computing, it provides an introduction of network perspectives on communication and organizing and uses this scholarship as a site to review theoretical, conceptual, and analytic issues associated with computational social science.

MCC-GE 3201.001 Dissertation Proposal
Professor: Brett Gary
Thursdays 2:00-4:50 PM | 4 credits

The formulation of doctoral research problems in culture and communication. Planning of relevant methodology; criticism of work in progress.

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