Affiliated Faculty

Center of Health and Rehabilitation Research

Affiliated Faculty

Alisha Ali
Associate Professor
Applied Psychology

Dr. Ali is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Psychology at New York University. Her research focuses on the mental health effects of oppression including violence, racism, discrimination and trauma. She has examined depression and its psychosocial correlates across a range of disadvantaged populations including trauma survivors, clients in poverty transition programs, psychiatric outpatient samples, and immigrant/refugee women.

Mitchell Batavia
Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, Chair
Physical Therapy

Dr. Batavia's broad research interests include evidence-based practice/risk guidelines, instrument development, augmented feedback and wheelchair/seating positioning. In addition to his teaching responsibilities and research, he has served as a manuscript reviewer for Perceptual Motor Skills, Butterworth Heinemann, and the Neurology Section of the American Physical TherapyAssociation (JNPT).

Marygrace Berberian
Clinical Assistant Professor
Art Therapy

In her current position, Marygrace Berberian is the Director of NYU Art Therapy in the Schools program. She led a research initiative examining the impact of art therapy on the self-esteem, affect regulation and impulse control of public school students. She has published work on the use of art therapy for post disaster recovery and cross-cultural competency in art therapy.

Clancy Blair
Professor
Applied Psychology

Clancy Blair is a developmental psychologist who studies self-regulation in young children. His primary interest concerns the development of cognitive abilities referred to as executive functions and the ways in which these aspects of cognition are important for school readiness and early school achievement. He is also interested in the development and evaluation of preschool and elementary school curricula designed to promote executive functions as a means of preventing school failure.

Natalie Brito
Assistant Professor
Applied Psychology

Natalie Hiromi Brito is a developmental psychologist who examines how early social and cultural contexts (e.g., poverty, multilingualism) shape the trajectory of neurocognitive development. Specifically, her research examines associations between the early home environment and the development of memory and language during the first three years of life. She has published work on learning from media, parent-child interactions, bilingualism, and how individual differences mediate brain-behavior associations during childhood.

Tracy Chippendale
Assistant Professor
Occupational Therapy

Tracy Chippendale’s research focuses on healthy aging and promoting the ability of older adults to "Age in Place". She studies non-pharmacological interventions for depressive symptoms, interventions to increase the geriatric workforce, and outdoor fall prevention.

Yael Goverover
Associate Professor
Occupational Therapy

Yael Goverover's main clinical and research interests focus on cognitive and functional impairments resulting from brain injuries. She has studied cognitive components and their associations with activities of daily living in individuals with acute brain injuries. Her current interests include developing interventions aimed at improving everyday functioning and quality of life in individuals with brain injuries and multiple sclerosis (MS).

Maria Grigos
Associate Professor
Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Maria Grigos' scholarly work focuses on the development of speech motor control in children, with a specific emphasis on motor and language interactions. Dr. Grigos directs the Motor Speech Laboratory at New York University. Work in the lab combines kinematic, acoustic and perceptual analyses to examine speech motor and linguistic processes in children.

Barbara Hesser
Associate Professor
Music Therapy

Barbara Hesser is Director of the Music Therapy program at New York University. In this capacity she coordinates the Master's and Doctoral Degree programs, is the Program Director of the Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy Center, and is the program liaison for Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) Training.

Maria Hodermarska
Clinical Assistant Professor
Drama Therapy

Maria Hodermarska's work spans both the creative and applied psychological uses of the theater arts in community-based mental health programs and substance abuse treatment programs for underserved populations. She has presented and consulted nationally on trauma, violence, substance abuse, and drama therapy to a variety of universities, community organizations and health institutions. She is a licensed creative arts therapist, a registered drama therapist, a credentialed alcoholism and substance abuse counselor, and an internationally certified alcohol and drug abuse counselor, and has held leadership positions in the National Association for Drama Therapy.

Tsu-Hsin Howe
Associate Professor
Occupational Therapy

Tsu-Hsin Howe's primary research interest focuses on examining motor behaviors in children who are at high-risk for developmental delay with a special interest in feeding related issues. Dr. Howe's specialty expertise includes neonatal occupational therapy and feeding management. Dr. Howe is trained in neuro-developmental treatment in pediatrics and is certified to administer the Neonatal Oral Motor Assessment Scale.

Kristie Patten Koenig
Associate Professor
Occupational Therapy

Dr. Koenig is an occupational therapist, with a PhD in Educational Psychology who examines the efficacy of interventions utilized in public schools for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Her research focuses on utilizing a relationship based paradigm and the individual with ASD's perspective to understand the impact of these issues on quality of life and adaptive behavior in order to guide person centered interventions utilizing strengths in inclusive settings.

Susannah Levi
Associate Professor
Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Susannah Levi examines how information about a speaker affects language processing. Her past research has looked at whether people sound the same when speaking different languages and whether being familiar with a speaker's voice in one language, helps a listener understand that speaker in a different language. Her current work expands on this to examine whether children, like adults, also show a processing benefit when listening to familiar talkers.

Wen Ling
Associate Professor
Physical Therapy

Wen Ling currently performs research regarding such topics as evaluating gait deviations and movement changes under differing conditions (e.g. pregnant women, women carrying materials of various weights, and children with cerebral palsy). Dr. Ling’s areas of expertise are in physical therapy examination and intervention for patients with neuromuscular disorders, clinical and advanced measurement methods for individuals with movement disorders, and research design and methods.

Tara McAllister
Associate Professor
Communicative Sciences and Disorders

Tara McAllister Byun is a linguist and speech-language pathologist who studies speech development in children with and without phonological delay or disorder. Her research aims to explain how children’s articulatory and perceptual limitations shape their early phonological development, and why some children's speech sound errors do not resolve over the course of maturation or in response to conventional forms of treatment. She has an active program of clinical research investigating the efficacy of intervention that uses technologies (e.g. ultrasound, acoustic analysis) to provide visual biofeedback for persistent speech sound errors in children.

Marilyn Moffat
Professor
Physical Therapy

Dr. Marilyn Moffat, a recognized leader in the United States and internationally, is a practitioner, a teacher, a consultant, a leader, and an author. Dr. Moffat’s research interests include cardiovascular/pulmonary physical therapy, Orthopedic physical therapy, exercise and fitness, national/international professional issues.

Janet Njelesani
Assistant Professor
Occupational Therapy

Dr. Njelesani's research investigates how the fields of occupational therapy, global health, and international development intersect to mediate participation in occupations for persons with disabilities. Her specific emphasis on the relationships among local, regional, national, and international forces and factors that influence participation in occupations led to the development of a new qualitative methodology, a critical occupational approach, which can guide critical approaches to occupational therapy research and practice locally and internationally.

Anita Perr
Clinical Associate Professor
Occupational Therapy

Anita Perr uses collaborative teaching to encourage students to explore the best ways to approach clinically relevant issues. Her extensive clinical experience informs her classroom teaching. Dr. Perr has expertise in the use of assistive technology by persons with disabilities and has lectured on topics such as seating and positioning and adaptive computer technology.

Alan Turry
Associate Research Scientist
Music Therapy

Alan Turry is the Managing Director of the Nordoff-Robbins Center for Music Therapy as well as researcher, senior clinician, level III trainer/educator and supervisor for advanced trainees and therapists, and teaches clinical improvisation in the NYU Graduate Music Therapy Program. His published research in music and medicine has focused on the psychological effects of musical elements.

Beth C. Weitzman
Professor
Nutrition and Food Studies

Beth Weitzman’s research interests focus on policies affecting the urban poor; she has evaluated a range of programs aimed at meeting their health, social service, housing, and educational needs. Dr. Weitzman brings to her research extensive experience in program evaluation and in primary data collection.