Literacy Education

Course Descriptions

First and Second Language Development: Building a Foundation for Literacy

LITC-GE 2010 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

This course provides and introduction to theories and research that support a rich understanding of oral language development and the multiple important roles that oral language plays in providing a foundation for learning to read and write. We will investigate the development of the major domains of oral language (phonology, vocabulary, grammar, and extended discourse) from birth through adolescence, and we will explore oral language development for both monolingual English speakers and children who are learning English as a second language. We will also explore how this deep understanding of oral language development can inform educators’ practical decision-making about language instruction.

Literacy Assessment

LITC-GE 2011 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Prerequisites: LITC-GE 2010, LITC-GE 2012 or LITC-GE 2014, and LITC-GE 2013 or LITC-GE 2015.

Survey of principles and practices of formative and standardized literacy assessments. Review of measurement concepts, psychometric principles, and the communication of test results to school personnel, caregivers, and other stakeholders. Practical experience applying a variety of assessments to inform, monitor, and evaluate instruction in classroom, intervention, or special education setting.

Reading Theory and Practices in Early Childhood and Childhood

LITC-GE 2012 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Core course for understanding the teaching of reading from early childhood through grade 6. Survey of reading theory, development, assessment, and related reading instructional practices. Focus on teaching the skills involved in reading words accurately and fluently to comprehend complex texts (literary, informational, digital media). Emphasis on providing appropriate instruction to students from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds and providing targeted intervention for struggling readers and students with dyslexia.

Writing Theory and Practices in Early Childhood and Childhood

LITC-GE 2013 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Core course for understanding the teaching of writing from early childhood through grade 6. Survey of writing theory, development, assessment, and related instructional practices. Examines the role of writing withina comprehensive, integrated curriculum including attention to narrative, expository and argumentative writing; how to address mechanics effectively; and supporting writers at risk of failing to meet grade-level standards, as well as reticent writers and students with dyslexia.

Reading Theory and Practices in Middle Childhood and Adolescence

LITC-GE 2014 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Core course for understanding the teaching of reading from grades 5-12. Survey of reading theory, development, assessment, and related reading instructional practices. Focus on teaching the skills involved in reading words accurately and fluently to comprehend complex texts (literary, informational, digital media). Emphasis on providing appropriate instruction to students from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds and providing targeted intervention for struggling readers and students with dyslexia.

Writing Theory and Practices in Middle Childhood and Adolescence

LITC-GE 2015 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.

Core course for understanding the teaching of writing from grades 5-12. Survey of writing theory, development, assessment, and related instructional practices. Examines the role of writing withina comprehensive, integrated curriculum including attention to narrative, expository and argumentative writing; how to address mechanics effectively; and supporting writers at risk of failing to meet grade-level standards, as well as reticent writers and students with dyslexia.

Politics and Policies of Literacy

LITC-GE 2016 30 hours: 3 points. Spring.

An examination of reading and writing education from historical, theoretical, critical, and pedagogical perspectives. Course questions include the role of literacy in a global society and the influences of policies and political practices. Research studies that have shaped literacy instruction in the last century are considered.

Text, Tools, and Culture

LITC-GE 2017 30 hours: 3 points. Winter Intercession. 

Using a wide range of texts (traditional and nontraditional) as primary tools in the teaching of reading comprehension from multiple perspectives. Strategies for locating, selecting, and evaluating resources and materials for use in classroom literacy programs, including texts that appeal to reluctant readers and students with special needs. Digital media such as information and communication technologies are emphasized.

Facilitating School Literacy Reform

LITC-GE 2065 30 hours: 3 points. Spring

Prerequisite: LITC-GE 2011 or permission of instructor.

Explores the role of the literacy specialist as the agent of ongoing school literacy reform. Attention to school professional learning communities, the role of data analysis in school reform, professional coaching, literacy program implementation and supervision, and the development of a comprehensive school literacy model.

Clinical Literacy Practicum–Early Childhood/Childhood

LITC-GE 2991 56 hours: 3 points. Spring (full-time students) and Summer (part-time students).

Prerequisite: LITC-GE 2011.

Practical application in designing and implementing targeted instructional interventions for students in grades 1-6 who are experiencing difficulty in acquiring literacy skills, including students in regular education and special education programs. Supervised individualized tutoring experience that is infomed by diagnostic assessment and ongoing progress monitoring. Emphasis on communicating assessment results and intervention outcomes to caregivers, school personnel, and other stakeholders.

Clinical Literacy Practicum—Middle Childhood/Adolescence

LITC-GE 2992 56 hours: 3 points. Spring (full-time students) and Summer (part-time students).

Prerequisite: LITC-GE 2011.

Practical application in designing and applying diagnostic instructional interventions for students in grades 5-12 who are experiencing literacy difficulties or students in special education programs. Supervised individualized tutoring experience that is informed by assessment and ongoing progress monitoring. Emphasis on communicating assessment results and intervention outcomes to caregivers, school personnel, and other stakeholders.