Last Graduate Students of Color Social of the Semester!

Don’t miss out on the last Graduate Students of Color Social of the semester!
Wednesday December 8th, 5-9 PM at Negril Village (70 W. 3rd St between LaGuardia & Thompson)

Socials are an opportunity for graduate students across disciplines to interact with one another as well as other members of the NYU community. Enjoy complementary appetizers and drink specials for the NYU community from 5-9 PM. All are welcome (21 and older with proper ID)!

Sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Education and Programs. December social in collaboration with the Office for LGBT Student Services.

November Conversations of Color

Please join us for Conversations of Color on Thursday, November 18th, 12:30-1:45 pm, Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, 3rd floor lounge.  Lunch will be provided. The goal of Conversations of Color is to provide a forum for students, faculty and administrators to meet and talk about issues of diversity. RSVP to: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/105617/rsvp-for-conversations-of-color
Please contact Jessica Walker at jessica.walker@nyu.edu with any questions. Sponsored by the NYU Steinhardt Office of Student Affairs

Relax with Biofeedback – new, cool, free

Need to relax?  Try BIOFEEDBACK – now available through Counseling and Wellness.  Okay, technically, biofeedback has been around for decades but only recently has it become easily available to NYU students.  Counseling and Wellness Services (CWS) has biofeedback training and monitors available to get you on the road to Wellville.  Learn how to use the hand-held monitors to regulate breathing and thinking to get your heart and mind working together. 

If you’re already involved in counseling at CWS, ask your counselor about the training.  If not. call the main counseling clinic at (212)998-4780, make an appointment for a brief phone triage, tell the triage counselor that you’re interested in the Biofeedback Training.  Come to CWS any Thursday at 2pm for training and to check out a monitor – if you are new to CWS, you’ll need to complete intake forms prior to your first visit.

THIS THURSDAY – NOVEMBER 11th  COME TO BOBST LIBRARY FOR FREE BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING FROM 4 – 5 PM.  CWS staff will be available in the Seminar Room 1-17A (next to the circulation desk near the 1st floor elevators)  You can get trained in the method and then check out a monitor from Bobst.  This is the only time the training will be done at Bobst for the remainder of this semester.  Get yourself in shape for finals – or even for those stressful holiday visits home!

Questions?  Call me directly at (212) 998-5061 or if you’re ready to get started, call for your triage appt (212) 998-4780.

Margaret Bailey, LCSW

Advisor’s Perspective: Email Etiquette

Many professors prefer to be contacted by email rather than, say, a phone call or a drop in. That’s because they tend to be busy during the day, and an email can be read at a time right for them (often at odd hours). Many if not most professors are very good at replying.  If you’ve heardnothing within a week, it’s ok to try again. Persistence often pays.

Keep in mind; you’re not emailing a friend. Do not write ‘hi’ or ‘hello’ in the subject line. Better, write something like ‘research in your lab’ or ‘Counseling Interview’. Do not send attachments and avoid adding backgrounds and smiley faces. Steer clear from slang.

Always address the recipient in the body with "Dr." or”Professor”

Don’t forget to sign your name, first name and last. Leave off your nickname as well.

What not to do:

Subj: Whazzzup!

Hi Greg (aka The ‘Simsters’)!

I heard you’re doing research on language stuff. I’d like to get involved. I don’t have much time though and would like to do stuff every other Tues from 3-4:45, unless there’s a basketball game. Please let me know.

Thanks!

Amanda (aka "Chicken Little")

p.s. I like your car!!  🙂

Much better:

Subj: Research opportunities

Dear Dr. Simpson,

I understand you are conducting research on perception and language. I would be very interested to get involved. Do you have any psych 480 opportunities?  I am a junior and am keenly interested in gaining research experience for grad school. I am a committed student, enthusiastic worker, and this experience is a priority for me.

Thank you very much in advance.

Sincerely,
Amanda Reckonwith

Justine Kelley-Fierro is an Academic Advisor in the Department of Applied Psychology

Faculty Perspective: Email Etiquette

Writing an email to a professor is a very common way to get information about a class, a grade or an assignment. Posting to networking sites and class portals is also becoming routine. It’s so common that it is easy to forget you are writing to a teacher and not a peer. Here are some things you should keep in mind when communicating with a professor electronically.

No yo! Teachers need a little respect. Even the most casual professor would prefer a complete sentence when you are contacting them. Structure an email to a professor more like you would a paper than a text message. Writing in formal English also makes you more direct and clear about what it is you are trying to ask.

Check your tone! It’s really easy to sound short and demanding when you are asking for something. As corny as it sounds to say, it is always a good idea to temper a request for anything with a please and thank you.

Turnaround time. Your professors are professionals and busy professionals at that! When you contact them outside of class you are entering into a relation with their professional space. So beyond common courtesy and tone you should be patient. A response may take a few days, even to a time sensitive question. It may be unreasonable to expect a response to a question before the next class!

Netspeak is a foreign language. Even simple emoticons may not be in a professor’s lexicon. Remember that these shorthand structures are context specific and without the experience of online gaming and rapid-fire interchange, many of these shorthand gestures are unintelligible 🙂

Jesse Bransford is a Master Teacher of Art and Art Education and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art and Art Professions at NYU Steinhardt.

For UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS – INTERGROUP DIALOGUE- 1 credit course on Diversity and Social Justice! Apply Now!

Undergraduate Participants Info Sessions (Kimmel 806):
Friday, Oct. 15, 12-1 PM/ Tuesday,11/16, 1-2 PM/ Thursday,11/18, 12-1 PM
Undergraduate student deadline: December 3 at midnight
Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) is a nationally recognized 1-credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to diversity and social justice. This 8-week course takes place in the spring semester only and facilitated by NYU Graduate Students.  Credit is offered through the Department of Social Sciences and Humanities in the Professions within the Steinhardt School of Culture, Communication & Education.
“The IGD class enables students to learn valuable lessons beyond what we would learn in other classes.  IGD was one the best experiences I’ve had and definitely the best class.  I’m glad I took this class and got to meet such wonderful individuals and facilitators. “ -2010 Participant
Check www.cmep.nyu.edu for more application information and important dates.  RSVPs for Info Sessions encouraged and contact cmep@nyu.edu for any questions.

For GRADUATE STUDENTS – Intergroup Dialogue- Facilitate an undergraduate course on Diversity and Social Justice! Apply Now!

Facilitator applications deadline is 11/29/2010! Apply at www.cmep.nyu.edu.
Two remaining information sessions! 11/2 from 6-7 PM or 11/10 from 1-2 PM Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) is a nationally recognized 1-credit course that brings together small groups of undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to diversity and social justice. This 8-week course takes place in the spring semester only and is facilitated by NYU Graduate Students.  Graduate Students can receive credit offered through the Department of Social Sciences and Humanities in the Professions within the Steinhardt School of Culture, Communication & Education or all also encouraged to participate for independent study.  More information is available at www.cmep.nyu.edu

Education Pioneers Summer Graduate Fellowship Information Session – November 4, 2010

Time: 4:30-5:30pm

3rd Floor Student Lounge, Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East

Refreshment will be served

Simply put, the Education Pioneers summer Graduate School Fellowship Program enables you to find your path in education reform, use your skills to make an impact, and join a network to transform education. Our Fellows

■consult with leading education organizations to complete mission-critical projects,

■participate in multi-disciplinary leadership development workshops, and

■gain access to a robust national network of education leaders.

Sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs

NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS INFORMATION SESSION – October 25, 2010

The Steinhardt Office of Student Affairs invites you to learn from the experts how you can apply for some of the world’s most prestigious scholarships through NYU.

Dr. Kim Germain, NYU’s Director of Scholarship Programs, and Dr. Catherine Moore, Music Business Professor and Fulbright Committee member, will answer questions about how undergraduate and graduate students can apply for and win scholarships to study and travel throughout the world.

NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS INFORMATION SESSION Monday, October 25, 2010 at 3:30pm Pless Hall, 3rd Floor Student Lounge

82 Washington Square East.

Please RSVP for the event at http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/265242/m7l0k

October Conversations of Color

Please join us for Conversations of Color on Thursday, October 21st, 12:30-1:45 pm, Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, 3rd floor lounge.  Lunch will be provided.
The goal of Conversations of Color is to provide a forum for students, faculty and administrators to meet and talk about issues of diversity.  

RSVP to http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/105617/rsvp-for-conversations-of-color