Fall 2011 Course Announcements for Undergraduate Students

SOED-UE. 1050 (Class # 14508): LGBT Topics in Education: Identities, Coming Out and Current Issues in Schools
Instructor: Maggie Fay; Email: maggie.fay@nyu.edu
4
Units; Day & Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 2-3:15 pm; Location: Waverly 435
All undergraduate students from all schools are welcome to enroll in this course.
Course Description:
This course focuses on LGBT experiences and the ways in which LGBT young people experience school. The course is designed to help students develop vocabulary and a general understanding of LGBT identities, particularly as these identities are depicted through sexual identity development models and popular coming out narratives. The course also asks students to apply social theory to coming out narratives to gain a critical perspective on how LGBT identities are produced. Students will examine how schools have responded to issues relating to sexual and gender diversity. The course pays particular attention to obstacles to, and potential solutions for creating inclusive educational environments for LGBT people. In light of the past year’s spate of LGBT youth tragedies, the course will examine current issues including schools’ responses to bullying and the creation of additional support mechanisms for LGBT youth in schools. Please contact the course instructor, Maggie Fay (maggie.fay@nyu.edu), with any questions.

New Steinhardt Minor: Global and Urban Education Studies

Steinhardt is launching a new minor in Global and Urban Education Studies, and we are very pleased that Pedro Noguera has agreed to teach one of the courses that satisfies the Urban track next fall: American Dilemmas: Race, Inequality, and the Unfulfilled Promise of Public Education (TCHL-UE 41; Class #16904; 4 Units; Day & Time: Wednesdays 9:30 am – 12:15 pm; Location: Kimball, Room 806). Professor Noguera is an urban sociologist and a leading national authority on school reform and urban education.

The course provides students with background on the historical and sociological foundations of education in the United States. It examines the role that education has played in advancing civil and human rights and it explores the ways in which education continues to be implicated in the maintenance of social inequality in American society. Through readings, lectures, films and class debates, students will gain an understanding of some of the most complex and controversial issues confronting education today including: affirmative action, Bilingual Education, Special Education, the achievement gap, school choice and vouchers, and the role of race and culture in student achievement.

Summer Support @ NYU Libraries

Graduate Students:
We know you work 12 months out of the year, so don’t forget: NYU Libraries are here to support your research needs throughout the summer. Check out our offering of library classes for the summer, which will be posted shortly here:
https://webapps.library.nyu.edu/classes
Don’t forget to take advantage of our grad spaces at Bobst Library during the summer months:
http://nyu.libguides.com/content.php?pid=31133&sid=629459
And lastly, feel free to use our Ask a Librarian service if you need assistance with library resources or research questions at any time:
http://library.nyu.edu/ask/
Keep an eye out for our fall instructional offerings — details coming soon.  In the meantime, have a great summer!
–NYU Libraries Graduate Student Working Group

Tea & Empathy During Finals

Take a study break and join the NYU Steinhardt Office of Student Affairs for a little tea & empathy.

Where: Pless Hall, 82 Washington Square East, 1st floor lounge

When: Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 2 pm – 4 pm

                                  and

             Wednesday, May 11, 2011 2pm – 4pm

We look forward to seeing you.  Good luck with finals!

Class of 2012 Resume Book Collection Begins Monday

Graduation will be here before you know it! If you plan on finding a job after graduation, the early stages of your employment search should begin now. Monday, May 2 – Thursday, May 19, the Wasserman Center for Career Development will collect resumes for the Class of 2012 Resume Books. In the summer and fall, these books will be distributed to hundreds of employers and serve as one source for recruiting Class of 2012 graduates.
Resume Books are heavily marketed to industries including finance, marketing, advertising, public relations, entertainment, health care, consulting, non-profit, government, education, real estate and many more.
To be eligible to participate:
    * You must be officially recognized by the University as receiving an academic degree (Bachelor, Master or PhD) January, May or September 2012 (certificate candidates, MBAs and Law students are NOT eligible).
    * You must have your resume critiqued by the Wasserman Center staff.
For details about how to participate, please click here on May 2.

Congratulations to the 2011-2012 GSO Executive Board!

Please join us in congratulating the newly elected 2011-2012 Executive Board for the Graduate Student Organization!

President: Victoria Sung

Vice President: Elizabeth Misiewicz

Senator: Yvonne Feiger

Event Coordinator: Colin Jamron

Publicity Chair: Alisa Zand

To get involved with Steinhardt’s Graduate Student Organization, visit their website: http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/gso/ or email the Executive Board at steinhardt.gso@nyu.edu.

National College Health Assessment Survey

All NYU students are invited to participate in an anonymous and confidential  web survey designed to assess student health behaviors, which will allow NYU to provide better health and wellness services and support for students. Check your email for additional instructions, the survey will be open until May 9, 2011.  Students who complete the survey will be eligible to win one of over 200 prizes including an iPad, $25 Trader Joes gift cards and $5 gift cards to Jamba Juice or Starbucks.

This study has been approved by UCAIHS, HS 10-5073.

UG Course Announcements For Fall 2011

Growing up in America: Communities, Families, Youth Culture, and Education  SOED-UE 21 Class #15387

This course engages students in the study of “growing up in America” through histories of families, schools, communities, and youth culture. The seminar also asks students to consider race, gender, and sexuality as key categories of historical and sociological analysis. Topics include, but are not limited to, studies on interracial relations, dating and courting, women’s experiences in education, race and beauty pageants, Gay men’s friendships, and the impacts of sex education. While this course is offered through the Sociology of Education program at Steinhardt, it is designed to be of interest to students of history, social studies education, American studies, gender studies, cultural studies, and other related disciplines.  Open to all undergraduate students in all programs and schools.

For further questions and copy of the syllabus, e-mail: John Palella, jp856681@albany.edu

This Praxis course will explore avant-garde movements in Paris, focusing on the relationship between theory and artistic practice.  Through studio and museum visits, reading, and films, students will gain a deeper understanding of the intersections of art and theory in French culture.  These investigations will provide the context for students to create a cohesive body of studio work during their time in France.  As an added bonus students will work and have class at a large atelier at the Sorbonne, interacting with art students and faculty. Visit https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/study_abroad/programs/summer/art_praxis for more info

Introduction to Communicative Sciences and Disorders CSCD-UE 17 Class #2935

This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to answer initial questions about the basis of communication, the causes and characteristics of communication disorders across the lifespan, and the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology.  For example, how do children develop normal speech and language?  What anatomy and physiology is relevant and necessary for normal communication?  How can communication become impaired after neurological damage? What are some examples of communication disorders that can occur throughout the lifespan?  What makes them disorders?  The role of speech language pathologists and audiologists in evaluation and treatment of communication disorders in both pediatric and adult settings will be explored as will the interdisciplinary nature of their work with teachers, psychologists, physical and occupational therapists and medical professionals.  Open to all undergraduate students; no departmental consent required.

Science of Language CSCD-UE 1045

LGBT Topics in Education: Identities, Coming Out and Current Issues in Schools  SOED-UE 1050 Class# 14508

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00 – 3:15 pm  All undergraduate students from all schools are welcome to enroll in this course.

This course focuses on LGBT experiences and the ways in which LGBT young people experience school. The course is designed to help students develop vocabulary and a general understanding of LGBT identities, particularly as these identities are depicted through sexual identity development models and popular coming out narratives. The course also asks students to apply social theory to coming out narratives to gain a critical perspective on how LGBT identities are produced. Students will examine how schools have responded to issues relating to sexual and gender diversity. The course pays particular attention to obstacles to, and potential solutions for creating inclusive educational environments for LGBT people. In light of the past year’s spate of LGBT youth tragedies, the course will examine current issues including schools’ responses to bullying and the creation of additional support mechanisms for LGBT youth in schools. Please contact the course instructor, Maggie Fay (maggie.fay@nyu.edu), with any questions.

Graduate Course Announcement for Fall 2011

Advanced Qualitative Methods Course
Course # RESCH-GE.2147 Fieldwork: Data Collection      Class # 2439
Fall 2011, Wednesdays, 2:00 – 3:40 p.m. Prof. Lisa M. Stulberg 
This course is the first in a two-part sequence on fieldwork. This first semester focuses on data collection. This includes a focus on gaining access to a field site, selecting a case, matching a research question with a methodology, and the nuts and bolts of taking and writing fieldnotes. The course is designed primarily for doctoral students who would like training in this method for their dissertation work.RESCH-GE 2140 Approaches/Qualitative Inquiry  (formerly E10.2140) is a prerequisite for this course.

Please feel free to contact Lisa Stulberg at lisa.stulberg@nyu.edu if you have any questions about the course.