Summer 2016 in Shanghai: Intensive Occupational Therapy Courses

The NYU Department of Occupational Therapy is excited to announce our partnership with NYU Shanghai to offer students two new courses for Summer 2016. The two courses being offered in China are taught by NYU OT faculty and are open to NYU OT students with advisor approval. Graduate students from other NYU departments, as well as practicing professionals are also invited to enroll with permission from the course instructor.

Eligible students will be able to select from two classes for the Summer 2016 semester:

  • Sensory Processing Challenges and Opportunities: A Focus on Autism: In this course, students will learn about the sensory processing differences for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
  • Advanced Hand & Upper Quadrant Evaluation and Intervention: This course examines the anatomical, biomechanical, and would-healing theories that support current concept in hand and upper-limb rehabilitation.

Shanghai, one of China’s biggest and most vibrant cities, is home to NYU Shanghai’s new Pudong campus. It includes an extensive library and modern classroom and laboratory facilities. You can take a virtual tour of the new Pudong campus here.

For more information, visit NYU OT’s Shanghai page.

Now Open for Registration! Sensory Smart Strategies for Real-Life Challenges


 

Saturday, February 28, 2016
1:00 – 5:00 PM
NYU Kimmel Center
60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012, Room 914

Click here to register for this workshop.

Sensory Smart Strategies for Real-Life Challenges
Practical Strategies and Solutions for Maximizing Participation of Children and Teens in Activities of Self Care, Learning and Play at Home, School and in the Community 

Lindsey Biel, MA ’99, OTR/L

Course Description 

This presentation will demystify sensory processing difficulties in children and teens, emphasizing practical strategies and solutions for maximizing participation in self-care, learning, and playing at home, at school, and in the community.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Define sensory processing and recognize sensory processing challenges in children.
  • Understand how sensory challenges impact behavior and learning.
  • Implement at least 15 “sensory diet” activities and environmental modifications to help children reach and maintain an optimal state of arousal.
  • Use strategies to cope with sensitivity to noise, touch, movement, sights, taste, smell, and sensory overload.
  • Share “sensory smart” parenting and teaching strategies with others.
  • Learn about the special challenges for teenagers.

Presenter Bio

Lindsey Biel, MA, OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist with a private practice in New York City who evaluates and treats children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, sensory processing issues, developmental delays, physical disabilities and other challenges. Her latest book is Sensory Processing Challenges: Effective Clinical Work with Kids & Teens, published by W.W. Norton. She is also coauthor of the award-winning Raising a Sensory Smart Child: The Definitive Handbook for Helping Your Child with Sensory Processing Issues, with a foreword by Temple Grandin and co-creator of the Sensory Processing Master Class DVD program. She teaches parents, teachers, therapists, doctors, and others across the country.

 

NYU OT 75th Anniversary Celebration

 

Alumni Spotlight: Danielle Butin Creates Foundation to Reduce Waste at Home and Promote Health Abroad

Alumni Spotlight: Danielle Butin Creates Foundation to Reduce Waste at Home and Promote Health Abroad

Butin graduated from NYU Steinhardt with a BS in Occupational Therapy in 1985.  She was drawn to Occupational Therapy because of its holistic approach to disabilities; pairing clinical expertise with individualized evaluation and intervention.  After graduating, Butin worked for many years as an occupational therapist serving older adults and later went on to complete her MPH at Columbia University.  She is now Founder and Executive Director of Afya Foundation, a medical supply recovery organization launched in 2007.

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Now Open for Registration! Integrating Yoga, Tai Chi, & Feldenkrais with OT Practices Workshop

As the second event of our Department’s 75th anniversary celebrations, we’re pleased to host:

Integrating Yoga, Tai Chi, and Feldenkrais with OT Practices
How Eastern and Western traditions can be integrated into occupational therapy practice to promote occupational performance throughout the continuum of care.
Presented by alumnus Richard Sabel, MA ’97, MPH, OTR, GCFP and Bill Gallagher, PT, CMY, CYT

Event Details
Date: Saturday, November 14, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Location: NYU Kimmel Center, Room 905/907
Address: 60 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012
Registration Cost: $125 Non-Affiliated Professionals, $100 NYU Affiliated Professionals (Alumni, Faculty, and Staff), $30 Current NYU Students

For more information please visit: http://bit.ly/1k5iRYK

Register Online Here

This event is limited to 50 participants and 3.75 contact hours are available upon completion.

An Interview with OT Blogger Sarah Lyon (’11)

Sarah Lyon

Sarah Lyon is the founder of the well-known OT blog, Potential, and she also writes as the OT expert for About.com. In an interview with SpOTlight, Lyon talks about her work with Potential, her time at NYU, and life after graduation.

Where did you get the idea for Potential?
Right after I graduated from NYU, I moved back to Nebraska­– my home state­–and started work at a hospital in a small town. Like NYU had taught me, I sought out a place of employment with a good mentor, and for the first couple months had the opportunity to work alongside an OT that I respected. But due to life circumstances, she had to leave the practice after a couple months. So all of a sudden, I was working by myself in an isolated area. Like any good millennial, I took to the Internet for resources to help me with my practice and simply could not find the information I wanted. Even the AOTA website was an older version and was really hard to access.

I saw a big gap in accessible information for OTs. So I started blogging in 2012. It was something I did in my spare time, off and on, for a couple of years. Then about a year ago, I moved to Chicago and while I was waiting for my license to get approved by the state, I started blogging more regularly and my numbers started ticking up. This made me feel like the information I was sharing was meeting a need. I’ve been blogging regularly ever since.

So, is this your full-time job?
I tell people it’s a part-time job– the hours vary from week to week. I’m not in clinical practice right now, because I’ve been able to generate enough income to make things work and I really enjoy the blogging process.

Is this something you ever saw yourself doing for a living while you were in school?
When I was in school, I was passionate about patient education. I was fascinated by the growing number of avenues for patients to learn about their condition and their treatment options. So I had a passion for sharing quality information, but didn’t know what a good outlet for that would be. I definitely didn’t anticipate myself writing this much.

You’re still young for having been practicing and now starting your own blog. Even with the experience you have, do you think your age has played a role in how people view you as an OT?
Sometimes I wonder if being a younger OT hurts my legitimacy. I certainly haven’t experienced everything. But, at the end of the day, there seems to be a need for quality information, and as long as the writing is solid and the piece is thoughtful and truthful, people seem to be open to hearing from a younger voice.

What do you hope for Potential in the next five years?
One opportunity that I’m particularly excited about is a new section called Rehab Share, which is place on my site where practitioners can post items they’ve created for their practice – anything from daily documentation forms to e-books. An online marketplace like this would have been especially helpful when I began working by myself in a small-town general hospital. I was generating so many items from scratch. It was frustrating because I knew there were OTs around the country who generated similar forms and policies already, but I didn’t know how to access them. I’m hoping that this new marketplace will be a helpful resource for OTs and that it will continue to grow.

What drew you to NYU’s OT program?
During my senior year at St. Olaf College, I decided last minute that I wanted to be an occupational therapist. At the time, I had it in my mind that there were good OT programs and not-so-good OT programs. I definitely wanted to go to a good one, so I looked up the top-10 OT programs and chose to apply to schools in cities where I knew people.

I’m thankful for the education I received at NYU. The quality of the education has given me a lot of confidence in my OT practice. Also, as I’ve begun writing about OT, the network at NYU has been invaluable. Five years out, my classmates are still my first phone call when I have a question.

What has your relationship with your fellow NYU alumni been like?
It’s been fun reconnecting with some of my classmates through the blog. I’ve had the opportunity to interview several of them. It has been fun to see the different routes people have taken. I’ve been really inspired at the success so many of my classmates have had early in their careers – from leading departments to opening their own businesses. I’ve seen a trend of my classmates really excelling.

After having been out of practicing OT for a while now, do you want to go back to it at some point?
Absolutely. Even if I decide to keep focusing on writing about OT, I know I need to experience OT on the ground. I also miss the interactions with patients and would love to at least pick up 1-2 shifts per week. But, for now, I have a toddler and am enjoying spending time with him.

What’s your favorite part about what you do?
One of my favorites is responding to peoples’ comments and interacting with people on social media.  The other highlight is simply putting out good information about OT that’s engaging and easy to read. Writing for consumers is a particularly fun challenge because I have to push myself to describe occupational therapy without all of the industry lingo that we we’ve become entrenched in.

NYU OT’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Alumni Panel

On Friday, October 2, NYU OT welcomed back six distinguished alumni to share their academic and professional experiences with current OT students. The inaugural event got the Department’s 75th anniversary celebrations off to a fantastic start. It provided a great opportunity for alumni to reconnect with the NYU community and interact with current students to share experiences and advice.

The event included remarks from six distinguished alumni, each with their own story behind their success within the field and how they got to where they are now.
The six speakers were:
Anitta B. Fox (’45, ’47): Among the first students at NYU to earn a degree from the Occupational Therapy program
Joan L. Sullivan (’70, ’75): Certified Hand Therapist; Owner of Private Hand Therapy Practice
Danielle N. Butin (’85): Founder and Executive Director of the Afya Foundation; Adjunct Professor at Columbia University
Glen Gillen (’89): Full-time faculty member in the OT program at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons
Suzanne Sanchez (’96): Senior Director of Therapy Services at the New York City Department of Education
Margaret Swarbrick (’96, ’05): Associate Professor at Rutgers University and the Director of the Wellness Institute at Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey

Click here to learn more about the speakers. Thanks to our alumni for coming back to visit!

NBCOT Therapy Ed Test Prep Course

The NYU Department of Occupational Therapy is pleased to announce that it will once again be hosting its Annual January NBCOT Exam Prep course offered by Therapy Ed. The two-day course will be held at the University on Wednesday, January 20th and Thursday, January 21st, 2016. NYU OT students are eligible for a $30 course tuition discount. To register, please follow the instructions on the NYU OT registration form.

Please visit http://www.therapyed.com/nbcot.htm for additional course information.

Occupational Therapy Department Study Finds Writing Workshop Gives Seniors a Sense of Purpose

http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/site/ataglance/files/2015/06/LivingLegends.jpgA unique program combining a life review writing workshop with conversations between seniors and college students enhances the sense of meaning in life for older adults living independently, finds a new study by the Steinhardt School. The study is published in the July/August issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy.

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AT&T and NYU Announce Winners of $100,000 Connect Ability Tech Challenge

Tech ChallengeAt an event marking the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Senator Charles Schumer joined AT&T and NYU’s ABILITY Lab to announce more than $100,000 in prizes awarded to developers of high-tech solutions to improve the lives of people living with disabilities.

A panel of experts, which included Occupational Therapy’s own Anita Perr, judged the competition and awarded $100,000 in prize money that was made available by AT&T and the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA).

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