OT Speaker Series: Cognitive-Functional Lecture

This semester, we were pleased to welcome Professor Adina Maeir and Dr. Ruthie Traub Bar Ilan of Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Professor Maeir and Dr. Traub Bar Ilan presented their 10 year summary of research and clinical activity of their project Cognitive-Functional (Cog-Fun) Intervention in Occupational Therapy for Individuals with ADHD.

Cog-Fun is an integrated cognitive functional treatment approach designed to address the multifaceted implications of ADHD on the individuals participation in daily occupations.This approach is based on the understanding that the core neurocognitive executive deficits in ADHD interact with psychosocial factors that impact daily functioning and quality of life. The Cog-Fun change mechanisms for improving functioning and quality of life include occupation-based meta-cognitive learning, behavioral learning and environmental adaptation, as well as a positive and empowering therapeutic relationship with clients and their families.

Professor Maeir and Dr. Traub Bar Ilan presented their data as well as showed video interviews with their clients as well as sessions with them to show the impact this treatment approach can have.

 

 

 

Occupational Therapy Offers New Autism-Focused Study Abroad Course

Associate Professor and Department Chair Kristie Koenig, will be offering a new graduate-level study abroad course in London this January. The course, Strength-Based Paradigm: A Focus on Autism, will examine the treatment of children and youth with autism spectrum disorder in a variety of settings. Participants will examine the efficacy of intervention through a strength-based lens and compare and contrast the theoretical basis of interventions in the U.S. and the U.K.

“The United Kingdom has been a leader in not only looking at what individuals with autism can do instead of what they cannot, but also is at the forefront in studying long term outcomes. For example, England’s National Health Service did the first study of autism prevalence in adults. This has lead to a more comprehensive understanding of autism as children grow up, which can be used to guide our understanding of strengths and challenges of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Koenig explained. Participants will attend lectures at the NYU London academic center and conduct site visits to local institutions to examine service delivery systems. The course will also offer ample opportunity to engage local professionals and visit cultural sites throughout the city.

Visit Steinhardt Global Affairs for more information on this and other global experiences available to NYU students.

NYU at the 2017 AOTA Conference

 

The American Occupational Therapy Association held its Annual Conference & Centennial Celebration in Philadelphia, PA from March 30 to April 2, 2017.  This milestone event had record breaking attendance with over 14,000 attendees. The theme for this year’s conference focused on the History of the OT profession. The conference also had an extra celebratory tone this year with a special Centennial Bash and Centennial Ball for attendees.

For the third year, NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy had a booth in the Expo. Alumni and current students stopped by to say hello, reconnect with the department, and show their NYU OT pride by wearing our popular NYU OT Alumni, Supporter, and Students badges. We also had a number of student and faculty presenters.

The booth also provided an opportunity for prospective students to learn more about the post-professional MA, OTD, and PhD programs. We were also excited to promote our new online OTD program starting Fall 2017. Faculty members and staff were on hand to answers questions about the curriculum, admissions requirements, and our remuneration program.

We hope to see fellow alums next year at the 2018 AOTA conference in Salt Lake City!

See below for a complete list of department presentations and posters:

Faculty:

Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

State of the Science Symposium:
“Resilience: Occupational therapy and its role in helping to adapt to adversity”. AOTF State of the Science Symposium Speaker at the American Occupational Therapy Association Conference, Philadelphia, PA March 2017.

Presentation: Shifting to Strengths and Success: Authentic Partnerships Between OT and Autistic Self-Advocates. With Stephan Shore

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Yael Goverover, Associate Professor

Presentation: Assessing Functional Cognition: Its Importance in Occupational Therapy Research and Practice
Contributing Authors: Carolyn M. Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Timothy J. Wolf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Joan Toglia, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

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Grace Kim, Assistant Professor

Poster: The Effects of Attentional Focus on Upper Extremity Motor Training Using Robotics With Persons After Chronic Stroke
Contributing Author: Jim Hinojosa, PhD, OTR, FAOTA; Mitchell Batavia, PhD, PT; Ashwini Rao, EdD, OTR, FAOTA

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Tracy Chippendale, Assistant Professor and Patricia Gentile, Adjunct Professor

Poster: Indoor and Outdoor Falls Among Older Adult Trauma Patients: A Comparison of Patient Characteristics and Outcomes

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Janet Njelesani, Assistant Professor

Conversations That Matter: Doing, being, & becoming a tenured professor: Conversations for junior faculty on the tenure track.

Poster: Test Construction of the Occupational Repertoire Development Measure- Parent (ORDM-P)

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Sally Poole, Clinical Assistant Professor

Short Course: Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy Intervention for Patients With Distal Radius Fractures. With Debra T. Zizik

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Tsu-Hsin Howe, Associate Professor and Jim Hinojosa, Professor Emeritus

Poster: A Postmodern Approach to Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy

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Students:

Chien-Ying Yang, PhD Candidate

Poster: Motor Performance of Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Fourth to Sixth Grades: Differences Among Subtypes
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Yun Shi PhD Candidate and Tsu-Hsin Howe, Associate Professor

Poster: Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Behavior-Based Feeding Questionnaire (BBFQ) for Taiwanese Mothers of Preterm Infants

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Brocha Stern, PhD Candidate
Poster: Time To Learn: A Neurobehavioral Approach After Musculoskeletal Hand Injury

Poster: Older and Happier? Associations Among Age, Affective Symptomology, and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis

Poster: Coaching in Hand therapy: Strategies for engagement and empowerment, with Mark Hardison

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Margaret Waskiewicz, OTD student with Steve Van Lew, Daniel Geller, and Liz Martori
Poster: Adult MTBI and Sensory processing

Poster: Determining the efficacy of OT treatment of postconcussive syndrome, with Elizabeth Martori

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Professional Program Recent graduates:

Catherine Stalter (MS Program), Elisabeth Bahr (MS Program), Norhora Guzman (MA Program), with Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

Poster: Afya: A Descriptive Study of Community-Based Long-Term Rehabilitation Project in Post-Earthquake Haiti

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Kristina Fusco (MS Program), Erin Devine (MS Program), Talia Zeitz (MS Program) with Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

Poster 4049 – Afya: The Impact of a Long-Term Rehabilitation Project on Pain and Function Outcomes in Post-Earthquake Haiti

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Marisa Davison (MS Program), Cara Flinter (MS Program), Nylah Lummer (MS Program), Katelyn Ryan (MS Program), Mallori Seliger (MS Program) with Grace Kim, Assistant Professor

Poster: The Use of Web-Based Resources To Facilitate Stroke Rehabilitation

 

Faculty Spotlight: Janet Njelesani

We sat down with new OT faculty member Dr. Janet Njelesani to learn more about her research and experiences in the classroom during her first year as a faculty member in the NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy.

How is your first year at NYU going, and what classes do you teach in the department?

My first year here at NYU Steinhardt has gone really well. NYU is such a large institution with so many resources and such strong diversity.

I am currently teaching Foundations of OT, which is a course for first year OT students and is often their first introduction to what the profession of occupational therapy really is. I also teach Evidence-Based Practice, which is a course for post-professional students in the OTD program, who are all currently practicing clinicians. Both courses draw on my research experiences and expertise in the study of occupation, so they are a pleasure to teach.

What is your background, and what brought you to NYU Steinhardt?

I completed my PhD at the University of Toronto in 2012 in a collaborative program of Rehab Science and Global Health. I had this interest as a practicing OT and a researcher in the intersection of how occupational therapy can work within a global health context. When I finished my PhD, I began to work internationally for UNICEF. What I did there was provide technical guidance to governments particularly in low and middle-income countries to help strengthen their national disability policies, national disability plans, and disability data collection.

While working at the policy level for a couple of years, I noticed that there was a gap in research, particularly about children with disabilities, so I wanted to return to academia to explore those areas.

Could you talk a little about where your research is focused, what sparked your interest in the topic, and what you are working on now?

My body of research broadly aims to enhance equity for children with disabilities in low and middle-income countries. I am especially interested in research on child protection violations against children with disabilities attending schools, and use critical qualitative methodologies to guide my work.

I am currently working on a project funded entitled “The Landscape of Child Disability in Rwanda”. The overall goal of the project is to improve the monitoring of the rights of children with disabilities in Rwanda, building on the work of the Government of Rwanda  and the National Council of Persons with Disabilities.

I am also starting a pilot project in Zambia to begin to understand the experiences of school violence against children with disabilities in Lusaka, Zambia, and start generating an evidence base on why children with disabilities are more vulnerable to violence at school than their non-disabled peers. The findings will be used to inform education programs and policies in Zambia and provide evidence that school violence against this population must be a priority. Currently, no programs or policies exist in Zambia that specifically address these issues.

What have you found to be the most rewarding aspect of teaching here at NYU?

The caliber of the students in this program is so high, and I have learned so much from them already from class discussions. I have also greatly enjoyed introducing my students to new avenues of OT that they didn’t know existed, and getting them excited about the broad scope and possibilities of the profession for them to explore.

Some students weren’t aware of the work OTs can do at the macro level, be it policy and working with governments like I have done to influence change for children with disabilities. OTs don’t just have to be in a one-on-one care or hospital setting to make a difference, but can also work in more consultative roles such as developing programs in countries that do not have occupational therapists for teachers that they can implement themselves to provide intervention to school children. I’m excited to open more doors for the students I work with here at NYU.