Fall 2016 Main Stage: “The Miracle Worker”

The Program is excited to announce that the fall show will be The Miracle Worker by William Gibson based on Helen Keller’s autobiography The Story of My Life. The Miracle Worker is a three-act play about Helen Keller, a girl who is blind, deaf, and mute who learns to communicate through the help of her teacher, Annie Sullivan. The original production of the play premiered on Broadway in 1959 and was subsequently adapted into a film featuring original Broadway cast members Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke, both of whom won Academy Awards for acting in the film.

Educational Theatre faculty member David Montgomery is excited to be directing this show in the Blackbox Theatre. All students are welcome to audition and audition announcements will be made soon.

 

 

 

Suddenly Seymour, and Audrey Too

(All photos by Chianan Yen)

It seems like only yesterday that I was being eaten, daily, by a carnivorous plant. While our Little Shop may have closed, the doors to reflective practices are ever wider. Thinking back, I am realizing that so much of what I have learned and experienced through my classes and extra-curricular work in this department have shaped me into the performer (/artist/educator/person) who appeared on that folding set.

Some takeaways which come to mind are:

  • the use of urgency during performance from Judyie Al-Bilali/Uta Hagen’s missing object exercise in the Acting: Fundamentals class
  • using improv within structure from David Montgomery’s Forum Theatre unit in the Intro to Educational Theatre class
  • learning to be authentic performer from Jonathan Shmidt Chapman’s Theatre for Young Audiences class and subsequent friendship
  • using presentational and physical styles of acting from all the work I have done with Nan Smithner

While these are potent examples, they are only a few which have contributed to my current artistry and I can’t wait to see how my experiences in Little Shop and other aspects of my final year as a student in the Program in Educational Theatre add to that growing list.

– Andrew Anzel (Seymour)

As a first semester graduate student, I figured there was no better way to learn about the Program in Educational Theatre than to throw myself into a departmental musical. I have never been a part of a university production where there was such a wide range of ages, backgrounds, and future plans. As an undergraduate Musical Theater major, the students in my department were all basically in the same place in our lives and had very similar career goals. Little Shop of Horrors provided a fascinating theatrical environment when both graduate and undergraduate students could work together building a show. The points of views, past production experiences and energy levels made the rehearsals and performances an incredibly colorful and rich environment and I thank whoever’s idea it was to let both the younger and older kids play together and put on a show.

– Bethany Moore (Audrey)

The School for Scandal

By Jason Boxer

It is a chilly February evening. The condensed rehearsal process for The School for Scandal is in full swing, and I am unshaven, tired, and behind on homework. With only a month to get this show up, I need to be managing my time wisely. I ought to hop on my bike and head home as rehearsal ends; there’s work to do.

But as I exit the historic Provincetown Playhouse, I decide to linger and talk with friends. Unknowingly, I have just set myself up to bear witness to the most memorable event that two years of collegiate life have thus far provided.

Our director – a Clinical Associate Professor of Educational Theatre – an educational veteran with a PhD, decades of experience, and numerous awards in her field – a woman who I had met only weeks before – approaches us.

“Did you know I can burp on command?” she asks.

I shouldn’t have been surprised. Dr. Nancy Smithner burped a mighty burp, and I had found a new role model. I will never forget my time in Scandal, nor the dozens of friendships that were forged in moments like the one described above. Thanks for the burp, Nan. It was very impressive.

The Crucible Arrives at NYUSteinhardt in March

The Program in Educational Theatre’s spring production of Arthur Miller’s classic The Crucible opens at the Provincetown Playhouse on Friday, March 1st. Take a moment to look at the following social media links to track progress as the production approaches:

Blog: http://cruciblenyu.tumblr.com/

Twitter:  @CrucibleNYU13

Instagram: cruciblenyu13

Cast of The Crucible with Michael Earley, Chief Executive of Rose Bruford College of Theatre

About this Event:

Philip Taylor, Director
Program in Educational Theatre
LOCATION: The Provincetown Playhouse, 133 MacDougal Street
ADMISSION: $15 General, $5 Student and Seniors
For tickets, contact NYU Ticket Central.
ONLINE: nyu.edu/ticketcentral/calendar
By Phone: 212 352 3101
IN PERSON: 566 LaGuardia Place
(at Washington Square South) 

Friday, March 1 at 8pm
Saturday, March 2 at 8pm
Sunday, March 3 at 3pm
Thursday, March 7 at 8pm
Friday, March 8 at 8pm
Saturday, March 9 at 8pm
Sunday, March 10 at 3pm