Two Weeks with the Queen Opens Tonight!

Tonight I caught the dress rehearsal for Two Weeks with the Queen, a fantastic show you won’t want to miss!
.
Based on a popular Australian novel by Mary Morris, Two Weeks with the Queen is a moving TYA play that appeals to people of all ages. While it explores some serious subject matter, director Philip Taylor ensures that the story is told with humor and warmth to create an uplifting experience about overcoming fear and handling the challenges that life has to offer. Fast paced, funny and skillfully directed, the show highlights a very talented ensemble of actors. Meghan Crosby gleefully and beautifully portrays the spunky and determined 12 year old Colin, while the rest of the gifted cast, including Cheryl Brumley, Maggie Bussard, Brendan Chambers, Eric Gelb and Shannon Stoddard, impressively play a variety of memorable characters. What a pleasure it was seeing them all work together so well, each making strong choices to create many lovely moments on stage.
.
The designers and crew also deserve praise, including Daryl Embry’s clever set design, Leah Cohen and Daryl Embry’s appealing lighting, Meaghan Cross’s delightful costumes, and Kari-Noor Thompson’s effective sound design. The production stage manager Sarah Brown, assistant stage manager Jiawen Hu, and assistant director Andrew Gaines are also to be congratulated for their hard work in helping to create this remarkable show.
.
Poignant and full of hope, Two Weeks with the Queen is a production with a lot of heart! Book your tickets now for the performances listed on the poster below.
.
.
Download the program here: https://tinyurl.com/2WksPrgrm
.
David Montgomery

Spring 2017 Main Stage: “Two Weeks with the Queen”

The Program is excited to announce that the spring show will be Two weeks with the Queen, a play about brotherly love in the face of a devastating disease. Auditions for this Theatre for Young Audiences classic will be in December. Based on an Australian novel by Morris Gleitzman and a stage adaptation by Mary Morris, Educational Theatre faculty member, Philip Taylor, is delighted to be directing this show in our landmark Provincetown Playhouse. All students are welcome to audition.

Audition Announcement: Brief Encounter

NOËL COWARD’S BRIEF ENCOUNTER


This play deftly explores the wild anticipation, tenderness, and heartbreak of an illicit English romance, circa 1938. Alec and Laura meet at a London train station. Both are happily married; both are content to be so; and both are naïve to their own latent desires for intimate connection, as well as the unbearable pain of unrequited love. Emma Rice’s adaptation of BRIEF ENCOUNTER integrates the songs of Noël Coward with his timeless, personal, and poignant text, bringing us one of the most exhilarating romances to hit the stage.

ADAPTED BY: Emma Rice
DIRECTED BY: Amy Cordileone
PERFORMANCE DATES: February 26 – March 6, 2016 (Provincetown Playhouse)

 

REHEARSALS BEGIN: Saturday, January 23, 2016

—————————-

LOOKING FOR: ACTORS, SINGERS, & MUSICIANS

 

Performers of all ages, races, ethnicities, sizes, & genders are encouraged to audition.

AUDITIONS:

Sunday, December 6, 2015

10 AM – 2 PM (10 min. appts.)
Pless Acting Lab

CALLBACKS:

December 6, 2015

3 PM – 7 PM (As Needed)
Pless Acting Lab

 

Email Amy Cordileone to request an audition appointment: amy.cord@nyu.edu

—————————-

WHAT TO PREPARE:

  • Text: Sides will be provided upon confirmation of audition appointment. No monologue needed. All roles require a British dialect – either Received Standard or Southeast/Estuary English (see the CHARACTER DESCRIPTIONS below). Dialect references available.

 

  • Music: Please prepare 1-minute (16 bars) of an early-20th century standard (Gershwin, Porter, Berlin, Coward, etc.). Feel free to email with questions or clarifications as needed. Piano accompaniment will be available. If you play an instrument and can accompany yourself, please do so (note: if you anything other than piano, please bring your own instrument to the audition).

Scripts will be available for checkout & perusal beginning Wednesday, Nov. 11, at 35 West 4th Street, Room 1207 (12th floor).

Tales of the Lost Formicans – Last Chance

#NYUformicans has four performances remaining. Get your tickets now! http://tickets.nyu.edu/single/eventDetail.aspx?p=2574 … …

Congratulations to the cast, crew, and director, Nan Smithner, of the spectacular Tales of the Lost Formicans. I’ve just come from the first of our two student matinees which had our audience emotionally engaged with a family on the brink and thoroughly entertained with songs, 80s costumes, and an especially physical performance from an ensemble of aliens. They sing; they dance; they narrate; they abduct–this production is not to be missed! And with the Halloween festivities coming this weekend, I might encourage you to get into the spirit with your own 80s flavored ensemble so that you too can travel back in time with us. – Jonathan Jones

Four performances remain:
Thursday, October 29 – 8PM
Friday, October 30 – 8PM
Saturday, October 31 – 8PM
Sunday, November 1 – 3PM

Q&A with Constance Congdon

While preparing the resource guide for our upcoming production of Tales of the Lost Formicans, Jonathan Jones sent some questions to playwright, Constance Congdon.

What was your inspiration when you wrote TALES OF THE LOST FORMICANS?

I don’t believe in inspiration, altho’ it has been known to strike WHILE I’m writing and sometimes it’s good. I had just come off of a huge adaptation project and decided that my next play would be for me. I also had started thinking about what culture was I from? Well, I’m from Formica.

What are you hoping teenage audiences, or any audience, will take away from seeing this play?

I hope any audience member would enjoy and be moved by it. It’s about transience.

As you celebrate the 25th anniversary of the publication of the play, has its meaning changed over time?

You know, it has remained a true picture of this time in which we are living.

What advice would you give to young people interested in a future career as a playwright?

First of all, “career” is the wrong word. Would you talk about someone’s career as a poet? Playwriting is a calling. What to do? Just write plays and don’t judge them. Enjoy your own work. Genius is just doing your work on a particularly lucky day. Persistance. And fun.

Do you have other plays that may be appropriate for young audiences?

They are published by Smith and Kraus and are in the many volumes that Craig Slaight of the Young Conservatory of American Conservatory Theater has published over the years. He’s gotten many major playwrights to write for young audiences. Mine are:  MOONTEL SIX; THE AUTOMATA PIETA; NIGHTENGALES.

Tales of the Lost Formicans opens Friday night, October 23. Tickets can be purchased here:

http://events.nyu.edu/#event_id/68803/view/event

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Sense of Gratitude in Real Time

By Elena Stephenson

When I reflect on my directorial contributions for In Real Time, I can’t help but feel a sense of gratitude. I feel gratitude for the experience, gratitude for the depth of learning, and gratitude for being able to work with a talented design team and ensemble. This experience was new for me because it was my first time serving as a director for a new play in development.

Table read at first rehearsal.

 

This past summer I was able to take Problems in Play Production with professor and playwright, Joe Salvatore. During that class, I was able to track the role of a director in the new play development process. That learning got to come full circle once I was able to put it to practice, by working alongside Joe as a director for one of his plays.

Window Cast (L to R): Kirstin Kammermeyer, Megan Ibarra, and Kyla Blocker

I immediately connected with “How do You Say ‘Window’ in Italian?”, catching the Three Sisters Chekhov reference in the title. The play appealed to me because of the strong sibling dynamic and the way that the sisters resembled Olga, Masha, and Irina. It was impossible not to connect to this play on a personal level because of my husband’s work as a nurse, specifically caring for those that suffer from dementia.

Window cast with director, Elena Stephenson (second from left)

What I loved most about all these plays is though they were very different, they all held a common thread of exploring human connection and capturing a moment “in real time.”

Photo © Chianan Yen

Directing M Squared

By Nick Robertson

When Joe Salvatore posted the Student Directing notice for In Real Time, I jumped at the opportunity.  I’d taken three directing classes in the department (with Nan Smithner and Amy Cordileone, all of which I highly recommend) and was eager to put the concrete skills I’d learned into real-world practice.  I applied to direct M Squared, a mysterious little play about a semi-schlub of a guy, Chad, whose sedate life is totally disrupted when Marilyn Monroe crashes into his kitchen one night.  As I began my application, I realized skills alone were not going to be enough to successfully direct this show.  The play spoke to me in a very personal way and I would need to acknowledge that, lean into it, and be able to share it with other people in order to do the story justice.  Deep down, what I connected to was this person who’d built a safe and static life, denying himself of some very deep-seated desires (passion! excitement! beauty! glamor!) until his subconscious literally had to wake him up to the possibility of a more integrated and joyous existence.  Talk about a classic equation for comedy!  What followed were three and a half months of continually jumping into the void of vulnerability, sharing a private part of myself through this play, first with Joe, then my cast, then the designers, then finally with the audience.  I found that at each step of the journey, people not only accepted what I shared with them, but supported and appropriated it so that by opening night, all of us were telling the same story from our own very personal points of view.  It was a really magical collaborative experience throughout, and one I hope to replicate in all my other theatrical work.

Photo © Chianan Yen

In Real Time: Educational Theatre Presents Six Original, Student-Directed Plays

In Real Time, a premiere performance of six new short plays written by NYU Steinhardt faculty member Joe Salvatore, will be presented by the NYU Steinhardt Program in Educational Theatre February 27-March 8, 2015. Each play is directed by students, working closely with Salvatore and 14 student actors.

educational-theater-presents-six-original-student-directed-plays-feb-27-march-8

The six short plays that make up In Real Time come from a series of eighteen plays that Salvatore wrote in 2012. Three of the plays were subsequently developed as part of a Writers Roundtable sponsored by the Program in Educational Theatre during the 2012-13 academic year. Salvatore also taught playwriting workshops to 180 middle school and high school students throughout New York City, whose feedback provided additional insights to develop the plays. Many of those students will attend the show in special school matinee performances on March 2 and March 6 at 10 a.m.

In Real Time features scenic design by Andy Hall, lighting design by Emily Stork, costume design by Márion Talán, and sound design and composition by Sam Crawford and Zeb Gould. The production stage manager is Talia Krispel, and Keith R. Huff serves as the production’s dramaturg. The directors are NYU Steinhardt students Katie Braun, Elena Stephenson Campbell, Yulissa Hidalgo, Haven Mitchell-Rose, Nick Robertson, and Shanae Sharon. The cast features NYU Steinhardt students Isaiah Bent, Kyla Blocker, Kordell Draper, David Ello, Nicole Gebler, Megan Ibarra, Kirsten Kammermeyer, Alexis Lounsbury, Adam Miller, Charlie Ponty, Sarah Smith, Devin Miranda Weise, Rachel Tuggle Whorton, and Peter Zerneck.

NYU’s production of In Real Time runs February 27-28, March 5-7 at 8pm, and March 1 and 8 at 3pm, at the Provincetown Playhouse (133 MacDougal Street). Tickets are $15 general admission and $5 for students and seniors. For tickets, contact NYU Box Office at tickets.nyu.edu or call the box office at 212.998.4941, or visit in person at 566 LaGuardia Place (at Washington Square South).