First Lady Michelle Obama Recognizes Project Discovery

By Rachell Hull

First Lady, Michelle Obama at left, and Rachel Hull at right

Shortly after completing my MA, EDTC in 2004 I applied for jobs in the wide ranging theater education, specifically within a regional theater. Ten years ago there was amazing pockets of work being done regionally, though not the pulsating hives that exist now, enough stimulating stuff for a recent grad and I was eager to put all that we had theorized and practiced to the test.

Being from Texas originally I wasn’t planning to return, thinking rather about setting sails for new horizons. But, through the interview process I found that Dallas Theater Center had been running a unique program whereby students in the surrounding public high schools were coming to the theater to see Suzan-Lori Parks and Nilo Cruz – playwrights I had just discovered in my grad classes.

How was it possible that this new work was finding its way so quickly to a high school audience, many of whom had never been to the theater before? What did that experience feel like? How was a regional theater providing this level of artistry for students at NO COST to the student? When I discovered further that these students weren’t being shepherded into a student matinee, but rather were attending evening performances and holding their own against the upper echelon of arts patrons in Dallas, I threw all expectations out the window and signed on.

That was more than 9 years ago, and it was the best decision I’ve made. Project Discovery led me through a deep exploration of community, an urban city like Dallas, a blue city in a red state, amidst a complex web of suburban and urban communities. It led me from a Manager of Education programs to the Director of Education and Community Enrichment – examining the intersection of arts education and community development. Project Discovery has shown me time and again the power of dedicated teachers and young people who demand and surpass high expectations. And it led me on November 22nd to the White House, where we received the 2013 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award.

Though the experience of walking the hallowed halls of the White House was amazing and surreal! It paled in comparison to the moment Project Discovery’s name was called. This award, presented by First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama recognized the 12 out of school arts and humanities programs in the United States that are at the top of their game! First Lady Michelle Obama opened up the ceremony telling the youth award recipients of how proud she was of them, and how proud they should be of themselves. To the educators she said, “You know better than anyone else the effect that art can have on a young person’s life. Giving the child a chance to fill a canvas, or to perfect a harmony or to shine on stage, that can spark the flames of a lifelong passion. And it can teach valuable skills: skills like hard work and persistence. It can open up possibilities that young people might not realize for themselves. There are thousands of programs all across the country that are doing this kind of important work every day.”

All of us at Dallas Theater Center are humbled by the excitement, congratulations and shared joy that has come from past students, classroom teachers, actors and teaching artists. There is an amazing team of support for this program, two of which are also NYU grads – Mara Richards, NYU Class of 2000 is our Manager of Education programs and uses her passion for Augusto Boal’s work to spark civic conversations prior to Clybourne Park just a couple of months ago. And Jenci Pavageaux, one of our dedicated, fearless Dallas ISD teachers spends her off nights bringing students to the theater. This tremendous recognition will be celebrated in January with participants, artists and supporters and the ripples of the award will continue to be felt, just as the impact of Project Discovery continues throughout North Texas. Though this award only confirms what Dallas Theater Center and participating schools throughout North Texas know, that this program is essential to the social and cultural development of our young people.

From the Program Director

By Dr. David Montgomery

The holidays always serve as a sudden reminder of the fact than an entire year has almost past.  It’ fun to look back, and when reflecting on Educational Theatre’s fast moving fall semester, so many events pop to mind that helped to make it exceptional.

The fall main-stage production of Meta, by Deborah Zoe Laufer and directed by Amy Cordileone, appealed to audiences of all ages by combining ancient stories with modern styles and music to examine the cyclical nature of humanity. With strong direction and top-notch performances and ensemble work by the actors, the story of Echo who looked critically at her own life was both educational and entertaining.  It was wonderful to see the high school audiences at matinees so highly engaged with the piece and asking significant questions during the post-show talk-backs, revealing the notable ways in which the show sparked audiences’ curiosity about the myths and their relevance to current society. Another collaborative effort resulted in performances of Sam Shephard and Joe Chaikin’s play Tongues. Directed by Dr. Nancy Smither in partnership with Jonathan Haas, the Director of Percussion Studies who oversaw the percussion ensemble, educational theatre actors and percussion students worked creatively to bring the play’s monologues to life through movement, words and inspired percussion instruments/sounds, creating a dynamic and visual theatrical experience.  The group was a big success at the The PASIC conference in Indianapolis, and performed again on campus at the Loewe Theatre.

Congratulations go out to our two student organizations as well. Uproar Theatre Corp had great success with their production of Godspell, directed by educational students  Sarah Jaffee and Dan Walsh, which incorporated clever staging and imaginative choreography to showcase students’ fantastic singing and acting abilities. Very impressive! Also, members of The Lamplighters created 5 beautiful pieces of theatre for young people that were showcased in December. Looking ahead, next semester we look forward to seeing Educational Theatre’s main stage production of School for Scandal, directed by Dr. Nancy Smithner, as well as the Theatrix short play festival and the performances of the NYU Youth Theatre Ensemble and Shakesspeare to Go. Additionally, an exciting collaboration between Drama Therapy and Educational Theatre will result in an upcoming performance about bullying, directed by Joe Salvatore. More information is to come regarding this performance, so stay tuned.

This semester’s Applied Theatre series featured workshops from facilitator Peter Friedrich who demonstrating theatrical techniques he used when working with an Islamic post-conflict society, from Anna Hermann and Imogen Ashby of the organization Clean Break who who explored their work with women in the UK criminal justice system, and from political-artistic coordinator Geo Britto who lectured about Augusto Boal and the work of the Center of the Theatre of the Oppressed’s in Rio. Other guest lecturers visited the Applied Theatre and Drama in Education classes, and in many courses, exciting work was created and shared. Theatre-making projects, as found in the Theatre of the Oppressed and Devising Theatre classes among  others, were showcased for the public at the end of the semester which celebrated the tremendous artistic work of our students.  I’ve also seen some very impressive masks and puppets floating around the office, created by students in Ralph Lee’s Mask and Puppetry class.

Importantly, several students put drama education theory into practice this semester as they student-taught at schools throughout the city. These students confronted the issues that every beginning teacher faces, planning lessons, knowing students as individuals and as members of a group, creating a positive classroom climate, expecting the unexpected—and much more.  Additionally, with the help of their instructors, they focused on successfully preparing for the new edTPA test.

So many other significant events transpired this semester, some of which are reflected in the older pages of this blog, and I want to thank the students, faculty, and larger Educational Theatre community for making it so special. Looking ahead, I’m struck with a wave of excitement for 2014, where the Program in Educational Theatre will continue to flourish, thrive and do great things. On behalf of the Program’s faculty, we wish you all the happiest of holidays and hope this year brings you joy, good health and success in all your endeavors.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: NYU Forum on the Teaching Artist: Navigation, Innovation, and Sustainability (April 25-27, 2014)

NYU Forum on the Teaching Artist: Navigation, Innovation, and Sustainability

April 25-27, 2014

Hosted by The Program in Educational Theatre at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development

For our 2014 annual forum, The Program in Educational Theatre spotlights the Teaching Artist. The intersection of pedagogy and aesthetics has extended its reach to a broad array of interdisciplinary perspectives and multiple art disciplines. We invite all allied professionals, newcomers, administrators, and researchers to exchange perspectives and collectively envision our shared future. The forum will begin Friday night, continue all day Saturday, and conclude Sunday afternoon.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS:

Submissions are due Monday, January 20, 2014 (11:59pm, EST), and we strive to notify potential presenters by February 17.

Click here to submit your proposal, review a comprehensive description of the event, and consider the governing questions behind this forum.

Feel free to submit any additional questions to NYUedtheatreforum@gmail.com or to add yourself to our mailing list for future updates…

Please share this information with a colleague, friend, list, and...wait for it…like us on Facebook!

We look forward to seeing you at NYU in the spring!

~Your 2014 NYU Forum Committee

The Program in Educational Theatre

Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development

New York University

82 Washington Square East

New York City

 

Reflections on the Program in Educational Theatre and Beyond

Hello Educational Theatre Blog Readers! My name is Naomi Avadanei, and I graduated from the Undergraduate Program in Educational Theatre this past May (2013). I consider myself very lucky to have found and been a part of the Educational Theatre community for 4 years–those 4 years were filled with so many incredible opportunities, inspiring moments, and (of course) invigorating classes. Upon entering senior year I had to make the ever-so important decision: to go to grad school right away or to take a few years off and apply what I’ve learned in the workforce. Clearly, I decided on the latter.

I started applying to jobs pretty early during my senior year around October/November and didn’t really stop until I got my first teaching job in mid-August. Currently I’m what many would call a “freelance teaching artist.” I work as the Theatre and Movement teacher at Hunter College Elementary School (3 days a week), the Education Associate at TADA! Youth Theatre (4 days a week) and a Teaching Artist with TADA! (several times a month), Brooklyn Children’s Theatre (1 day a week), Salk Middle School (1 day a week) and The Paperbag Players (several times a month). Throughout my application process I would estimate that I applied to over 100 different positions in total. It was a long, arduous, and VERY stressful process, but I’m really happy with the companies I’m working for, the people I’m working with, and the work that I’m doing. It all paid off. When I was applying to jobs I was pretty stubborn about only applying to and accepting positions teaching theatre. In my case this was the most important non-negotiable. I realized I wouldn’t be happy in my chosen career path unless I was working in some respects teaching theatre to kids. As I was applying to positions (and it got closer and closer to the beginning of the school year) I started to have doubts about my non-negotiable. Was I being unrealistic? It turns out that just as I was starting to give up hope, a posting for a Theatre Teacher at Hunter College Elementary School came up on the List Serv (the List Serv is a gold mine–read those emails, they could lead to something!), and I applied. I was offered the position on August 19th, just 23 days before the first day of school. After that I kept getting various Teaching Artist positions from previous connections and interviews and everything sort of just came together. So while my story is unique to my experience, I’d like to share with you some of the things that helped me get where I am now and what I wish I knew/know as I was looking for a job and as I start my first year of teaching Theatre and Movement with students ages 3-12.

Classes (required and not) that you should take (and pay really, really close attention in):

First and foremost, I think this needs to be said because I didn’t figure it out until late in my Junior year/early Senior year. There’s a point in your college career where you have to stop thinking about classes and class work in terms of being a student and getting good grades and start looking at it as preparation for your future career. This may sound really silly but let me explain; I always prided myself on good grades and completing assignments well but often once the assignment was handed in that was it. I forgot about the bulk of the work necessary to complete the assignment (these are the details are really valuable and helpful later on) and moved on. My advice to you is to take those good ideas, great activities, and awesome tools and create a running list (preferredly an organized one). You’ll thank yourself later on. Ask questions in class and complete assignments through the lens of a teacher and an artist, not just a student–you will inevitably get good grades and you’ll make your transition into teaching much easier.

  • Any of the artistry/practical classes (Playwriting, Directing, Physical Theatre, Stagecraft, any Shakespeare Class). Even if you’re not interested in a career in Shakespeare or don’t want to become a playwright it’s important you LEARN about these things so that you’re prepared to TEACH them later on.

  • Dramatic Activities in the Elementary and Secondary Classroom–that running list I was talking about, these classes will be the equivalent of gold for that list.

  • Theory of Creative Drama

  • Some sort of Movement Class–I took Intro to Teaching Creative Movement through the Dance Ed. department. This class will help make you a more dynamic theatre teacher and a more attractive candidate.

Things I wish I had known:

  • Teaching Portfolio

    • Spend a lot of time on it, it’s worth investing the time.

    • Be organized when creating it, you will inevitably print and reprint the material in your portfolio. You will add, you will subtract, you will create new material. Create separate folders and documents for everything.

    • Be pushy about showing your portfolio to your interviewer. I wasn’t always so assertive in presenting my portfolio. For my first few interviews I waited for the interviewer to ask me for it. They didn’t. Assert yourself. Bring your portfolio and gently suggest (read: force) them to look at it. Show them all of the time and effort you put into it. Pick a few highlights to show them–no one will have time to look at the whole thing. Show what’s most relevant to the position.

  • Letters of Recommendation

    • Ask for them even before you need them. Don’t expect people to have a fast turn over. You want the person who is recommending you to take their time and do a good job on your letter so give them the opportunity to do just that. Ask them for the letter 1-2 months before you anticipate needing it.

    • Get a variety of letters: people who have seen you teach (both in the elementary and secondary classroom–if you’re interested in teaching both–you want those letters to be separate so that you can have them ready should you be applying for a position in that area), people who have supervised you in an administrative position, people who have worked with you in an artistic setting etc. You want a variety so you have at least one letter for every type of job you might apply to.

    • This point is similar to the Teaching Portfolio point. Most employers won’t ask you for a letter of recommendation. Give one to them even if they don’t ask for one either in a hard copy at the end of an interview or as an attachment to your follow up email.

  • Get all of your certification paperwork and exams out of the way and submitted as early as possible. You don’t want to be thinking about them when you’re applying to jobs–you’ll have enough stress without worrying about whether or not you’re teaching certification went through.

  • Get in touch with past employers and internship coordinators, let them know you’ve graduated and are looking for work. You never know, sometimes the stars align and they’re looking for someone just like you.

  • Have a backup curriculum prepared for all age groups you’re interested in teaching–even if it’s just an overview

    • Some employers might ask you to create a curriculum on the spot (mine did).

    • In case you get hired last minute (I did) you won’t have to start from scratch, but you’ll have somewhere to pull from and creating a year long curriculum in 2 weeks (or 2 days) won’t seem as daunting as it could be. Remember that list I talked about? This is when that comes in handy.

    • Speaking of creating a curriculum I don’t think we really talk so much about the logistics of creating a curriculum. It’s an area the program could work on. This is not to say you don’t get a lot of tools during your time at NYU, but not exactly: How do I create a curriculum? What should YOU do? Take initiative. I recommend you ask your Cooperating Teachers, they’ve been there and they’ve done it. So while their teaching styles might be very different from your own, take the time to ask them and talk through the process. It’ll help you when you have to create a curriculum of your own.

I really hoped this post helped you. If you have any more questions please feel free to contact me at Nja235@nyu.edu

In Conversation with Finegan Kruckemeyer and Gabriel Jason Dean

In Intro to Theatre for Young Audiences with Jonathan Shmidt Chapman

By Tamara Weisz

When I started Jonathan Shmidt Chapman’s Intro to Theatre for Young Audiences class a few weeks ago, I knew that we were extremely lucky to be analyzing the world of TYA through reading some of the most incredible, thought-provoking TYA scripts out there today. Little did I know I’d be in for a treat, when two authors whose work we had been reading joined us for a lively discussion on Tuesday, October 8, 2013.  As Gabriel Jason Dean and Finegan Kruckemeyer entered the room, our faces were giddy with big grins of excitement, and we were automatically greeted with a charming hello by Finegan – he’s Australian – and Gabriel, saying he was sorry not to have an accent to woo us with. Thankfully their sense of humor made us laugh and calm our nerves before delving into this exciting conversation.

Who are they?

Finegan Kruckemeyer and Gabriel Jason Dean

Gabriel Jason Dean is an American playwright whose first TYA play, The Transition of Doodle Pequeño, received a lot of praise at last year’s John F. Kennedy Center New Visions/New Voices conference for dealing with issues of gender identity through a humorous and compelling story. ‘Doodle’ has been work-shopped in a variety of settings, and is being made into a children’s book as we speak, but has yet to have a full professional production. Finegan Kruckemeyer is based in Australia and has had 52 of his plays performed around the world. In class, we have read two of his plays, Helena and the Journey of the Hello, and The Tragical Life of Cheeseboy. You can probably tell by all of the above play titles that these two playwrights are challenging the notions of what is children’s theatre, and we were eager to hear their opinions.

 

Taking Risks in a Changing Scene

Both writers are challenging norms of what we think that children can handle or understand. They believe that children are capable of exploring heavier subjects, and their plays deal with complex emotions, including sadness. Often, producers get nervous that their audiences will not understand this type of subject matter and they may think that sad moments ultimately classify a play as inappropriate  – something not to be shown to children. A lot of times, adults are trying to speak for kids and it is here we realize that the problem is not with the children – it is with the adults. How do we change this conversation? How do we take risks in producing plays and trust that child audiences will go on the journey, even if it includes ups and downs? The taboo of sadness in TYA is something that both of these writers are trying to break, which is an amazing feat.

In all, Kruckemeyer said that he writes plays that he feels will resonate with audiences that bare the same humanity as him; if he can be moved towards empathy, he hopes that will resonate with anyone, regardless of their age– and in that sense, there is no difference between children and adults. If we focus on telling great stories, they will be universally understood.

Where Are We Now?

What was really inspiring was hearing both playwrights talk about working in America right now, at a time where we are on the cusp of an exciting directional change; something new is brewing in the world of TYA – we are doing some soul searching, and people are starting to realize that it is okay to take risks and challenge preconceived notions of what TYA is fundamentally. They also mentioned how amazingly collegial the TYA scene is in the States, where different people from different companies across the nation are actively in conversation about TYA’s future.

Hopes for the Future:

Kruckemeyer hopes that we stop focusing on the ‘what’ – what will the show be about? Everyone wants to know everything beforehand – can we trust our audiences? He hopes people will come experience the ‘what’ in the theatre itself, and he hopes that a lot of how’s and why’s come along with it. Dean looks forward to seeing braver choices, and stepping away from current trends (adaptations and “safe” titles). While both writers understand that there’s financial risk involved, they hope new work is created which invests in the storytellers of our generation.

Some Fun Facts:

– Did you know that Finegan Kruckemeyer has a 13 year old dramaturg that he’s been working with for years now? He says she scrutinizes his work in every aspect!

– Gabriel Jason Dean work-shopped his play, Doodle, in a middle school in Austin, TX for 6 weeks and working with children fundamentally changed the play. He believes if we trust children with the work, they may truly have something to teach us.

For more information on these playwrights, please visit:

http://finegansworks.com.au/

http://www.gabrieljasondean.net

———————-

Tamara Weisz is a graduate student in Educational Theatre in Colleges and Communities. She will continue studying new play development as a Graduate Student Observer at the Kennedy Center’s New Visions/New Voices conference in 2014.

Announcing Auditions for The School for Scandal

Please come out to audition!! All ages, sizes, shapes and levels of experience are welcome!!

The School for Scandal, a Restoration comedy, has been called a superbly crafted laugh machine, and  “timeless in delivering delectable comeuppance to a viper’s nest of gossip mongers!” Written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan in 1777, the play demonstrates his narrative vivacity, verbal sheen and degree of wit in purely polished stagecraft — indeed, his theatre sense was acute and he knew how to write rewarding roles.

Masquerading behind the veneer of polite London society, malicious prattlers trade gossip like gamblers. After all, what could be more fun than a good scandal?

Come on, Ed Theatre, let’s do some COMEDY (of manners)!

Performance dates encompass the last weekend of February and the first week(end) of March.

Audition dates (please sign up in the Ed. Theatre office): 

Wednesday 12/4 7 – 10pm, Acting Studio, Pless Basement
Friday 12/6 5 – 6:30pm Room 303, Education Building, 35 W. 4th

7 – 10:00pm, Acting Studio, Pless Basement

Saturday 12/7 10:00am – 1:00pm, Acting Studio, Pless Basement
Saturday 12/7 CALL BACKS  2 – 4:00pm, Acting Studio, Pless Basement
Please prepare a 2 minute comedic monologue, either classical or contemporary. Please note: willingness to work in a dedicated creative ensemble is essential.

 

Directed by:

Dr. Nan Smithner
Clinical Associate Professor
Program in Educational Theatre
Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions

The Program in Educational Theatre Graduates Its First Married Couple!

History will be made in the Educational Theatre doctoral program May 2014 as we graduate our first married couple, Drs Jennifer and John Socas. 

Jen’s study, “Performing through Layers: reading the world through theatre in Zanzibar,” and  John’s, “Enhancing self presentation through drama at a community college: Rehearsing the job interview,” make exceptional contributions to the field.

Jennifer and John Socas with their daughter Arden.

Professor Taylor, chair of both dissertations, commented that it is a rare feat to have two doctoral studies by a couple, let alone two from the same college program in one year. “We are all so incredibly proud and humbled by the achievement of the Socas family,” said Taylor. “Maybe one day their 4 year old daughter Arden will enroll at NYU too to make a hat-trick, but no pressure please!”

—————-
While used mostly in sport, such as cricket, a hattrick is accomplishing a positive feat three times .

Tongues by Sam Shepard and Joseph Chaikin, to be performed Fall 2013

The Program in Educational Theatre has been taking part in a unique collaboration with the Department of Music and Performing Arts’ Program in Percussion Studies, on a new production of Sam Shepard’s play, Tongues. Written in 1978 by Shepard and Joseph Chaikin, Tongues is a series of monologues set to percussion, and was first performed at the Magic Theatre in San Francisco. Chaikin and Shepard explored a dramatic form stripped of plot elements and reduced to essentials of sound and utterance. Shepard writes: “Tongues is a play about voices. Voices traveling. Voices becoming other voices. Voices from the dead and living. Hypnotized voices. Sober voices. Working voices. Voices in anguish.” In this lyrical and poignant theatre piece, the inherent philosophical themes are hunger, work, family, death, and the poetic sense of human possibility.

Dr. Nan Smithner is directing the piece, in collaboration with Jonathan Haas, Director of Percussion Studies, who oversees the percussion ensemble.  The actors from our program are Andrew Anzel, Heleya de Barros, Ashley Hamilton, and Clare Hamoor. They have contributed greatly to the realization of the piece with inventive aesthetic suggestions. The percussionists, Abigail Fisher, Robert Guilford, Brandon Nestor and Sean Perham, have worked creatively with the actors to bring the text to life using a variety of unusual and inspired percussive instruments. Through movement, words and sound, the percussionists interact spatially, musically and emotionally with the actors, creating a dynamic and visual soundscape.

This NYU collaborative production is going to culminate in a presentation at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, on November 13, 2013 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The piece will also be performed at NYU on Monday, November 25th at 7:30pm in the Loewe Theatre, 35 West 4th St.

Lincoln Center Education

Dear Ed Theatre Community,

It is with great pride and excitement that we share with you the announcement of Lincoln Center’s first rebranding in history for its education division – rebranded as Lincoln Center Education.  With the completion of a $1.2 billion redevelopment of the Lincoln Center campus, this rebrand reflects an unprecedented expansion in the field of arts education by the world’s leading performing arts center.

Announced only recently, and in addition to a new name and a new visual identity (created by Ogilvy & Mather and The Brand Union), Lincoln Center Education (LCE) received $4 Million from the Sherman Fairchild Foundation to add innovative programs to its core work – the largest education grant ever awarded to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

Lincoln Center Education’s rebranding arrives after a year-long examination of its existing programs and initiatives. New programs will join established efforts in schools and in the community, reflecting the organization’s updated vision and objectives. Harnessing the resources of Lincoln Center, LCE has realigned itself to most effectively develop arts education programs in five distinct areas:

  • K-12 education: programs for more than 25,000 students in over 200 schools in the New York metro area.
  • Higher education: partnerships with local colleges and universities to train teaching candidates in arts education and help recent graduates find employment with school partners.
  • Community outreach: programs include Poet-Linc, Lincoln Center Local, and other free events such as the monthly Meet the Artist series in the David Rubenstein Atrium, designed to engage the community in the arts and events at and beyond the Lincoln Center campus.
  • Lincoln Center Institute: LCI is refocused as a dedicated institute within LCE for research in arts education, and training for educators using an arts-based teaching model.
  • Consultancies: LCE’s special consultancy practice shares its expertise in arts education and creative learning.

In addition to the work we’ve been doing for over 35 years, we are thrilled to share the following new programs and initiatives:

  • “Arts in the Middle” – this new pilot program, created in partnership with the New York City Department of Education, is a three- to five-year initiative beginning in the 2013-14 school year to provide arts programming and teacher training at public middle schools which are underserved in the arts, so as to make the arts a lasting part of these schools and their community.
  • Lincoln Center Education is commissioning a work designed for an audience of children on the autism spectrum.
  • Lincoln Center Education is expanding the existing Lincoln Center Local program, which brings free Lincoln Center programs to neighborhood libraries in the outer boroughs, and alternative locations such as shelters, senior centers and facilities with incarcerated youths.
  • Two additional charter schools partnering with the New York City Department of Education and New Visions for Public Schools have opened this fall, making a total of six that are operating to date. LCE expects to ultimately partner on 18 charter schools.
  • “Next Stage” – Lincoln Center Education is launching a new series of panel discussions, lectures and other programs in the coming months, seeking to generate high-profile discussions on important topics in arts education. This public forum will allow established artists to demonstrate how education has played a role in their work. The initial forums will each be focused on particular arts genres, including dance, music, theater and visual art.

Lincoln Center Education is a global leader in arts education and advocacy and the education cornerstone of Lincoln Center, the world’s largest performing arts complex.  As such, LCE is committed to enriching the lives of students, educators, and lifelong learners by providing opportunities for engagement with the highest-quality arts on the stage, in the classroom, digitally, and within the community. Founded in 1975 as the Lincoln Center Institute, LCE has nearly four decades of unparalleled school and community partnerships, professional development workshops, consulting services, and its very own repertory. LCE has reached more than 20 million students, teachers, school administrators, parents, community members, teaching artists, pre-service teachers, university professors, and artists in New York City, across the nation and around the world.

If you visit our ‘splash page’ (our new website will go live in early spring!) by going to www.LincolnCenterEducation.org you’ll notice our new value proposition, which is at the core of everything we do:

The arts cultivate a unique skill set that is indispensable for the 21st century: problem solving, collaboration, communication, imagination, and creativity. Lincoln Center, the world’s premier performing arts center, translates those skills from the stage to the lives of children, equipping them for success in their careers and to serve as active participants in their communities. We offer a distinctive approach to education that helps young minds perform in a dynamic world.

We invite you to learn more about our work and the many ways in which you can be a part of it.  The Educational Theatre community has given us so much – we look forward to increasing our engagement with the program, its staff, its students and its alumni.

With much love and appreciation,

Russell Granet (MA ‘95) – Executive Director

Alex Sarian (MA ’07) – Director, Finance & New Business

Melissa Gawlowski Pratt (current PhD) – Program Manager