TYA 2017 Summerfest at NYU

NYU’s Educational Theatre Program is thrilled to host a special roundtable event for the New Plays for Young Audiences 20th Anniversary to explore emergent directions in writing and producing works. Panelists include Laurie Brooks, award winning TYA playwright; José Cruz Gonzales, a leading Hispanic voice in TYA; Cecily O’Neill, foremost drama in education authority; David Montgomery, Director of NYU’s program and author of Theater for Change; Kathy Krysz, archivist for ASU’s Child Drama Collection; Courtney Boddie, Director of Education/School Engagement at the New Victory Theater, and our panel will be moderated by Philip Taylor, NYU Educational Theatre professor.

The event will take place on Saturday, June 17, 2017 at New York University.

Email andrewgaines@nyu.edu to be added to our mailing list for updates.

ArtsPraxis, Volume 3

ArtsPraxis Volume 3 has been published.

It is with great enthusiasm that I present this third volume of ArtsPraxis. In 2003, I worked as a research assistant for Philip Taylor cataloging the extant journals in the arts, arts education, and arts therapies disciplines in order to demonstrate the need for the first volume of this publication. To find myself now as Editor is both humbling and gratifying, given the time and attention that I have contributed to this journal over the years.

This volume features a number of articles that were presented in some form at the Forum on Educational Theatre in April 2016, for which I served as manager. The Forum celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Program in Educational Theatre at New York University: building on the past and looking towards the future. The event was a fine testament to the legacy of the Program’s founders, Lowell and Nancy Swortzell who began the Program in 1966. All told, with presenters, performers, staff, volunteers, and delegates, the participant pool exceeded 400 individuals, demonstrating the strength of the field and a commitment from colleagues the world over to come to New York, share their work, and celebrate this milestone.

The 3rd issue of ArtsPraxis is available for download here.

 

Editorial

JONATHAN JONES

 

“A kick in the pants” or Mentoring as “a brain to pick, an ear to listen and a push in the right direction” (John C. Crosby 1859 – 1943)

JULIANA SAXTON, CAROLE MILLER, and  MONICA PRENDERGAST

ABSTRACT

The elegant phrases of John Crosby to describe mentoring have been amended and added to over the years to include, “a shoulder to cry on and a kick in the pants” (Josefowitz, 1980). This paper is a follow-up to the podcast the authors engaged in with Edie Demas as their moderator at the NYU Forum on Educational Theatre, April 2016. Here on the editor’s invitation, we expand on our conversation, moving from our personal experiences of mentoring/being mentored to examining the confusions that arise over the application of the term itself, what is effective mentoring and how it may be derailed. We begin with what we said (slightly modified) about our own experiences of mentorship to set the context.

 

Theatre in Education: It’s a critical time for critical thinking

ROGER WOOSTER

ABSTRACT

Theatre in Education emerged in the 1960s from roots in progressive education and new wave theatre and developed a pedagogy heavily influenced by drama and education philosophy. At the heart of this theatre/education hybrid was a belief in the necessity for children to become critically engaged with the world. The best TIE offered children the tools to understand and to shape their world. This progressive approach to education has been marginalised during the last forty years. This article charts this descent into utilitarianism and asserts the need for Applied Theatre and TIE to enhance students’ critical thinking skills rather than offering didactic messages and exercises in socialisation. The obstacles to working authentically with TIE are multifarious. Alongside issues of funding, timetabling, access to students and appropriate working space, there are problems associated with appropriate training in TIE praxis. Professionals no longer have the access to the necessary research and rehearsal time where facilitation skills can develop. The ‘authentic teaching’ lauded by Heathcote is out of favour at the time when critical thinking skills are of paramount importance. This article asks if there is a way for TIE to adapt to the new realities of how children learn and play so that again it can offer a theatrical safe haven where critical thinking skills can be honed in order to equip young people with the critical skills to shape their own futures.

 

Kiss me Khatema: Kate’s “capitulation” in The Taming of the Shrew as seen by female Muslim university students

JAMES PAUL MIRRIONE, PhD

ABSTRACT

Shakespeare’s plays, especially those that have a modern day resonance to the issues of the modern world, are indeed elastic in their ability to speak across generations and cultures. This paper provides a number of sample responses by young Emirati female students at United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) from courses taught by the author, who was in residence there as the Drama and Theatre specialist from 2005-2014. Over the course of several semesters, these female Muslim university students’ verbatim comments reveal how Kate’s final words moved them to respond in the varied ways they did. These responses demonstrate the emotional tightrope that the students seem to be navigating; one that originates in tradition while also clashing with modernity. The Taming of the Shrew, and the journey of Kate as she is confronted by the challenges of an arranged marriage within a patriarchal society, is one that speaks to these students. As a non-Muslim practitioner of theatre and drama, the challenge was to see which of these two personas would win out – a Kate or a Khatema – which turns out to be the subject matter for a larger societal investigation of the roles of men and women in the United Arab Emirates.

 

From ‘discovered’ to ‘constructivist’ in applied theatre programmes: Preparing postgraduate students as future artist-educators

ROSS W. PRIOR

ABSTRACT

Applied theatre as a named field is still relatively new yet ‘the range of applied theatre practice is vast; it happens all over the world as part of a grassroots movement involved in social change and community reflection’ (Prendergast & Saxton, vi: 2009). This article explores the underlying teaching philosophies inherent in the published course descriptors of a sample range of eight graduate/postgraduate programmes in applied theatre across three countries. The selection of these programmes, although somewhat random, has been based upon their prominence within academic parlances and those that provide programme documents in English. Consequently the representative sample survey is across one cross-section of postgraduate provision and is analysed in order to extract a range of philosophical themes underpinning learning and teaching. In distilling these philosophies the article presents a discussion of how the subject knowledge of applied theatre work ranges from ‘discovered’ to ‘constructivist’ in nature. In turn these themes are interrogated against published research in the field and postulate on how applied theatre programmes might further consider the ways in which they adequately prepare their students as future artist-educators to work in this diverse and challenging field. An outcome of the survey revealed grand claims made in the published programme descriptors.

 

Facilitating social justice dialogues after interactive theatre performances: An introduction to our methodology

TRENT NORMAN, REBECCA BROWN ADELMAN, and LIGIA BATISTA SILVERMAN

ABSTRACT

Applied theatre performances that address social issues can inspire feelings and reactions. In this article, we draw from our experience working together as facilitators since 1999 as examination of the challenges we have encountered and the importance in holding space for difficult – yet productive – conversations. Working from a framework of inclusive justice, we merge social justice practices in applied theatre and inclusive education. We share with the readers our experiences with the role of self as facilitator and the concept of holding space; we challenge the idea of neutrality in facilitation, and advocate for the facilitator as instrument to change. We are not offering a manual of instructions – we offer, instead, a few ingredients that other facilitators may also find helpful in their practice.

 

“They have become my family”: Reciprocity and responsiveness in a volunteer-led program for refugees and migrants

ANNE SMITH

ABSTRACT

Creative English is an applied theatre program that supports English language learning for adult refugees and migrants in the UK. The program is shaped by an ethic of care, focused on responsiveness, reciprocal relationships and empowering individuals to take action. This article identifies challenges and opportunities highlighted by the rapid expansion of a project governed by these values and delivered by volunteers.

 

Secondary students confront issues of identity through devising and performing a new play at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe

SONYA BAEHR

ABSTRACT

In 2014, secondary students at the Poly Prep Country Day School began an eleven-month project with their acting teacher and a professional playwright that culminated in performances at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in August of 2015. The goal was to premiere a new play created out of the concerns and challenges facing these young Americans as they wrestled with their national identity in an increasingly interconnected world. The students also dealt with issues of race, class, and sexual identity as they refined dialogue and characters in daily rehearsal sessions. The director’s process of building Americans in Breshkistan was modeled on that used by professional companies when they workshop a new piece with a playwright. The students created choreography and stage combat, as well as nonverbal movement sequences in which they worked together as an acrobatic team. The project united and engaged thirteen students of various races, classes, ethnicities, sexual orientations, and personality types. Students were responsible for creating and realizing the lighting and sound designs and for running the show. This project could serve as a model for schools to adopt into their regular curriculum, connecting high-level, student-created productions with performance possibilities at local professional theater venues.

 

Mapping the field of young playwrights programs in the United States

JIM DEVIVO

ABSTRACT

The production of plays written by young people has been in practice at theatre companies and arts organizations in the United States for nearly forty years. However, while young playwrights programs have emerged across much of the country in the past decade, the field has not been adequately addressed in the literature. This paper addresses the scope and variety of young playwrights programming and compares the praxis of organizations engaged in the work.

 

ArtsPraxis Volume 4, Issue 1

ArtsPraxis Volume 4, Issue 1 looks to engage members of the global Educational Theatre community in the ongoing dialogue about where we have been and where we are going. This call for papers is released concurrently with ArtsPraxis Volume 3 and the submission deadline for Volume 4, Issue 1 is February 1, 2017.

 

Swortzell Innovator Awards Presented at 50th Anniversary Alumni Celebration

L to R: John Patrick Shanley, Jay DiPrima, Trent Norman, Rebecca Brown Adelman, and Lynda Zimmerman

The planning committee for the 2016 Forum on Educational Theatre accepted nominations to honor emerging and seasoned theatre arts practitioners, educators, and thought-leaders changing and impacting our field with their work, reflecting the qualities and values modeled by Nancy and Lowell Swortzell, founders of The Program in Educational Theatre at New York University 50 years ago.

Nominees represented excellence in at least one of the following areas:

  • Drama in Education, Applied Theatre, or Theatre for Young Audiences

At the 50th Anniversary Alumni celebration, the Program acknowledged the recipients of the 2016 Swortzell Innovator Awards:

In recognition of excellence in Drama in Education, the Program honored Lynda Zimmerman, co-founder of the Creative Arts Team, the oldest and largest Educational Theatre Non-profit in the United States.

In recognition of excellence in Applied Theatre, the Program honored Rebecca Brown Adelman and Trent Norman, co-founders of Affinity Arts, an applied theatre company dedicated to positive social change in Colorado and neighboring states.

In recognition of excellence in Theatre for Young Audiences, the Program honored Jay DiPrima who has successfully nurtured the Aurand Harris Memorial Playwriting Award for the New England Theatre Conference for two decades.

NYU’s Program in Educational Theatre thanks the awardees for their service to their communities and to our field.

 

One of our awardees, Jay DiPrima, shared these words with us:

It is an honor to be recognized as a Swortzell Innovator in the Theatre for Young Audiences and Play Production.

Nancy & Lowell’s passion for plays for TYA go back more than the 50 years of this program’s founding – the work of Theatre in Education in England, the founding of The Creative Arts Team that has served youth throughout NY, their avid interest in International Youth Theatre (ASSITEJ), Lowell’s multiple publications of plays for young audiences and published collections of plays for young audiences from around the world and now their enduring legacy of New Plays and the nurturing of playwrights for young audiences hosted here at the Provincetown Playhouse.

This is the stream I go afishin’ in.

I believe the particular reason that I received this award (in addition to the fact that I have been engaged in work as writer, director, producer, and actor for young audiences for too many years), is because of my association with Lowell Swortzell and Aurand Harris.

Back in the day, I studied beginning and advanced playwriting with Aurand Harris and Lowell Swortzell. When Aurand died back in 1996, I was in a position as Chair of the Children’s Division of the New England Theatre Conference to help establish a memorial playwriting award in his honor. Another member of the division, Nina Schuessler (another NYU alumni) who worked with Aurand for many years at the Harwich Theatre on Cape Cod while he tested out his new works in production, affirmed this proposal.  When I called Nancy and Lowell to seek their advice, (as they were now executors of his estate), they were thrilled. So NETC voted to initiate the Award in November of 1997 with Lowell and Nancy as honored guests and speakers at the event in Worcester, MA. Thus The Aurand Harris Memorial Playwriting Award was created to honor the late Aurand Harris (1915-1996) for his lifetime dedication to all aspects of professional theatre for young audiences. I’ve had the honor to serve as the Chair of this Award for seventeen years.

Since its establishment, 25 new plays for young audiences have received either a $1,000 first place or $500 second place award. Every playwright has been honored at the annual conference and many works have received staged readings. I am proud to report that 16 of these plays have received publication either in the Dramatic Publishing Company, Pioneer Press, New Plays, Inc. Anchorage Press, Dramatists, Baker’s Plays or Jacpublishing. So, the work of playwrights for young audiences is alive and well. The goal is similar to the vision of Lowell and Nancy in establishing the New Plays for Young audiences reading series here at the Provincetown Playhouse – a place where new works are realized and playwrights are recognized.

I will recount two quick stories about Nancy & Lowell at the 1997 NETC Convention.

As Guest speakers at the New England Theatre Conference 1997, Nancy recounted a story about their role as executors of Aurand’s estate. When Aurand passed away in 1996, he had named Lowell and Nancy executors of his estate. While they were busy taking inventory of all of his material in his apartment, Nancy noticed a duffle bag at the bottom of his closet. Assuming it to be dirty laundry, she suggested to Lowell that they simply throw it into the incinerator and be done with it. Lowell, being the meticulous and diligent executor, said they had to pull it out and account for every detail. When they opened the bag, lo and behold, they found stashes of money – going back to post depression treasury bonds, cash and stock. When it was all accounted, it was worth nearly a quarter million dollars in value! The irony that Nancy highlighted was the manner in which Aurand lived – as if he was a poor teacher! He would often have to borrow an overcoat to go to the theatre with them! And here sat $250,000 in his closet! The funds were bequeathed to the Children’s Theatre Foundation and serve to this day as a source of Aurand Harris Fellowships for artists serving young people and grants for small and mid-sized theatres throughout America. It is a gift that keeps giving. For more information about their mission, grants and record of giving, see http://www.childrenstheatrefoundation.org/

Lowell highlighted some key points in Aurand’s life … quoting from the recent book he wrote on Aurand (as the authorized biographer) – The Theatre of Aurand Harris: His Career, His Theories and His Plays, c. 1996

In the Preface he writes: “When invited to undertake the writing and editing of this volume I first felt honored, then horrified – honored to be entrusted to document the career of the preeminent American dramatist for young audiences and horrified that he had written so damn many plays! That “damn” by no means modifies the plays, only their number, for, as I now know, most of Aurand Harris’ fifty published works remain refreshingly live. “

In writing about the evolving playwriting craft of Aurand, Lowell says:

“In the works of Harris, we are dealing with a repertory drawn from diverse cultures and from every type of literature for young audiences, including fairy and folk tales, short stories, novels, biography, history, drama, and poetry.

His works also utilize such diverse performance styles as commedia dell’arte, farce, melodrama, realism, comedy, musical plays and revues.”

So … when a playwright holds bountiful dramatic ideas in one hand and an array of theatrical forms in the other, he or she has every chance for a career as long and rewarding as the one chronicled here.”

Lowell ended with a favorite story of Aurand shared at the NETC Conference in Worcester 1997.

Aurand was fond of a question reporters inevitably asked when interviewing him –

“Do you have any children?”  Remembering Johnny Appleseed’s answer to the same inquiry he responds:  “Why, of course, a thousand and they bloom every spring.” But plays are even better than trees for they bloom and bear fruit all year round, and beyond.”

This is the legacy that Nancy and Lowell have left to us – the plays and the makers of plays for young audiences that bear fruit all year round, and beyond.”

Thank-you!

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #10

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

Paper: Why Performance Literacy? Why Now? Launching a Secondary Level Performance Studies Curriculum

We live in a highly dramatized world and performative society. What are the intellectual, emotional and physical effects, both positive and negative, of living in such a performance-driven world? How is the field of education responding to the fact that we are immersed in multiple and complex dramas and performances on a daily basis? What might a secondary level curriculum in performance studies offer young people as a way to develop their performance literacy; to individually and collectively investigate and engage with performance as a personal, collective, cultural and sociopolitical event?

The performance studies curriculum developed over the past 2 years and presented in this paper consists of seven thematic units. Within each unit, students are invited to consider how performance functions as 1) a form of human and nonhuman play, 2) as a ritual act, such as a wedding or funeral or rite of passage, 3) as part of the healing process, 4) as a medium for education, 5) as a site for identity formation and representation, 6) as the enactment of power and, finally, 7) as a way to better understand the experiences of everyday life. These are key concepts in performance studies and are a significant part of the skill set I am interested in developing in young people as performance literacy.

Monica Prendergast teaches undergraduate courses in elementary/middle school drama education, a post-degree secondary level course on drama and diversity, and graduate courses in curriculum studies. She works with graduate students in curriculum studies, interdisciplinary studies, language and literacy and applied theatre. Prendergast has received numerous Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada grants (2004-2012), worked on a major Ford Foundation grant investigating learning through arts integration (2008-2010), and her small theatre company received a Capital Regional District Arts Development Project Grant (2012). She sits on the Faculty of Education’s Centre for Outreach Education Steering Committee and the Department of Curriculum & Instruction’s Strategic Planning Committee. Prendergast is also a member of her department’s arts education, curriculum studies and language and literacy communities.

 

 

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #9

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

Paper 1: Mashing up Beowulf: Toward a New Intermediated Pedagogy of Drama, Technology and Performance

This paper reports on an intermedia (mashup) performance making project exploring the pedagogical affordances of machinima, large puppetry and live performance with young people. The project that is the basis for this research paper was held at the University of Sydney in partnership with the Australian Theatre for Young People. The week of workshops, part of the DARE Playing Beowulf project (http://darecollaborative.net/category/projects/playing-beowulf/), adapted the story of Beowulf through giant puppet-making and performance, mimetic performance and digital game sequences in a performative mashup. The paper will explore how this process succeeded in making drama with young people. The paper will also explore how successfully the performance making process developed a hybrid pedagogy for teaching mixed media performance realized through the cognate forms of drama and game. The paper will draw on video sequences that were projected during the final performance to demonstrate the pedagogical and performative processes the mash-ups employed during the week. The paper concludes with some reflections on the future of intermedia (mashup) pedagogies for drama education, youth theatre and beyond.

Dr. Michael Anderson is Professor (Arts and Creativity) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney. His research and teaching concentrates the role of creativity, the arts (particularly drama) and play have on learning. This work has evolved into a program of research and publication that engages with arts classrooms directly. His recent publications explore how aesthetic education and research is changing learning in the 21st Century. These publications include: Applied Theatre: Research (with Peter O’Connor, Bloomsbury, 2015), Partnerships in Education Research: Creating Knowledge that Matters (with Kelly Freebody, Bloomsbury, 2014), Masterclass in Drama Education (Continuum, UK), Teaching the Screen, Film Education for Generation Next (with Miranda Jefferson), Drama with Digital Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron, Continuum, 2009) and Real Players: Drama, Education and Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron Trentham, 2006).

See more at: http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/about/staff/profiles/michael.anderson.php#st hash.UX6FjcDo.dpuf

Dr. David Cameron is Deputy Director, Academic Technologies at the Centre for Teaching and Learning at The University of Newcastle, Australia. He has worked as a radio broadcaster and content producer, news editor, and multimedia designer. His academic career includes lecturing in journalism, media and communication. His research interests encompass digital game-based learning, applied drama and technology, social media, mobile media, and online education. David was a Chief Investigator on an Australian Research Council Linkage Project (2007 – 2010) with the Australian Defense Simulation Office, developing and trialing digital game-based and online role-based simulation tools for use in crisis management simulations and training. A prototype scenario and Web-based simulation engine were produced for Australian Defense Force public affairs personnel. This work draws upon and expands David’s research interests in digital game-based learning, the use of ‘everyday’ digital and online media technologies in learning and teaching, and the application of traditional applied drama conventions and techniques to produce engaging blended learning activities. Recent publications have examined the links between drama, education and technology. David has also researched and published widely in the communication and journalism education fields. He is interested in the impact and application of mobile media and social media, and the implications for higher education and training in the media and communication disciplines.

Dr. Celina McEwen undertakes research in the arts and education. She also has research interests in adult community education especially projects focusing on Community Cultural Development, Health Promotion and Community Leadership. She has completed a Doctorate in the Departments of Performance Studies and Anthropology at the University of Sydney. Her thesis describes the alteration of the social realm that takes place for participants engaged in community cultural development (CCD) projects in terms of learning and change.

 

 

 

 

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #8

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

 

Plenary Panel: Global Research Current in Educational Theatre

Chair:  Philip Taylor, NYU (IDIERI 1, Brisbane 1995)

Speakers:

Carole Miller, University of Victoria, (IDIERI 2, Vancouver Island, 1997)

Juliana Saxton, University of Victoria, IDIERI 2, Vancouver Island, 1997)

Cecily O’Neill, The Ohio State University (IDIERI 3, Columbus, 2000)

Ross Prior, University of Wolverhampton (IDIERI 4, Northampton, 20003)

Brian Heap, University of West Indies (IDIERI 5, Kingston, 2006)

Michael Anderson, University of Sydney (IDIERI 6, Sydney, 2009)

Michael Finneran, University of Limerick (IDIERI 7, Limerick, 2012)

Prue Wales, National Institute of Education (IDIERI 8, Singapore, 2015)

Peter O’Connor, University of Auckland (IDIERI 9, Auckland, 2018)

Conveners of the International Drama in Education Research Institute reflect on the field and its development.

Philip Taylor was director of the NYU Educational Theatre program 2003-2012. He is now Director of Doctoral Studies for the Steinhardt Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions and author of influential texts. He is an avid vintage movie poster collector, and enjoys writing at Katharine Hepburn’s table (she was a four time Oscar winner).

Carole Miller and Juliana Saxton are both emeriti professors at the University of Victoria, holding adjunct professorships in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and adjunct appointments at the University of Sydney, Australia. Each is the recipient of an Excellence in Teaching award. Together they chaired the 2nd International Drama in Education Research Institute 1997, were responsible for the Academic Program for the 5th World Congress of IDEA 2004 and served as the Reflective Keynote speakers for IDEA 2007 in Hong Kong. Their collaborative research is primarily situated in pre-service teacher education with a focus on inquiry-based instruction, applied theatre and the relationship of brain research to theatre practice. Their award-winning book, Into the Story: Language in Action through Drama (2004 Heinemann) will be followed in 2016 by Into the Story 2: More Stories! More Drama! (Intellect, UK/ University of Chicago Press).

Ross W. Prior, PhD, is a teacher, author, academic, and former producer, performer, director, and casting/theatrical agent. He is Professor of Learning and Teaching in the arts in Higher Education at the University of Wolverhampton, UK. He is best known for his book Teaching Actors: knowledge transfer in actor training (Intellect & University of Chicago Press) and his work in applied arts and health as Founder Principal Editor of the Journal of Applied Arts and Health for seven years to date. He has a record of research surrounding learning and teaching within a range of educational and training settings.

Dr. Brian Heap is tenured Senior Lecturer and Head of the Philip Sherlock Centre for the Creative Arts, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, where he has taught and supervised undergraduate and graduate Drama programs for the past 20 years. Brian is internationally recognized as an authority on Process Drama and has an extensive research and publication record in this field. He also engages in consultancy, staff development and project work relating to drama as a pedagogical process and has served in leadership roles nationally and internationally including consultation in drama for Jamaica’s National Curriculum. He was convener of the Fifth International Drama in Education Research Institute in Jamaica in 2006.

Dr. Michael Anderson is Professor (Arts and Creativity) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney. His research and teaching concentrates the role of creativity, the arts (particularly drama) and play have on learning. This work has evolved into a program of research and publication that engages with arts classrooms directly. His recent publications explore how aesthetic education and research is changing learning in the 21st Century. These publications include: Applied Theatre: Research (with Peter O’Connor, Bloomsbury, 2015), Partnerships in Education Research: Creating Knowledge that Matters (with Kelly Freebody, Bloomsbury, 2014), Masterclass in Drama Education (Continuum, UK), Teaching the Screen, Film Education for Generation Next (with Miranda Jefferson), Drama with Digital Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron, Continuum, 2009) and Real Players: Drama, Education and Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron Trentham, 2006).

See more at: http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/about/staff/profiles/michael.anderson.php#st hash.UX6FjcDo.dpuf

Dr. Michael Finneran is a Senior Lecturer in drama at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, Ireland, where he is Director of the BA in Contemporary & Applied Theatre Studies and supervises graduate research. Michael is the reviews editor and a member of the editorial board of RiDE: The Journal of Applied Theatre & Performance. He was academic director for the 7th IDiERI (International Drama in Education Research Institute), held in Limerick in July 2012. He is co-editor of Drama and Social Justice: Theory, research and practice in international contexts (Routledge, 2016) and co-editor of Education and Theatres – Innovation, Outreach and Success, forthcoming from Springer in 2017.

Prue Wales is Assistant Professor in Drama Education in the Visual and Performing Arts Group at Nanyang Technological University. In 2015 she was Conference Director of the 8th International Drama in Education Research Institute (IDIERI). Her research interests include drama/theatre education, identity/subjectivities, drama with new medias, and performed research.

Peter O’Connor is Professor of Education and Director of the Critical Research Unit in Applied Theatre at the University of Auckland. He was a founding co director of Applied Theatre Consultants Ltd.

 

 

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #7

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

Workshop: Challenging a Japanese Model of Friendship through Drama: Would You Be Able to Sacrifice Yourself for Your Friend?

The Japan Foundation London has developed the ‘JFL Japanese Scheme of Work for Primary Schools’ since Modern Foreign Language in the National Curriculum in England became compulsory at Key Stage 2 in September 2014. It is based on the ‘Key Stage 2 Framework for Languages’ (Department for Education and Skills, 2005) and the ‘JF Standard for Japanese-Language Education 2010’ (Japan Foundation, 2010), both of which originates in Council of Europe’s language education policies.

I developed one of units for Year 4 students in the scheme with a Japanese language advisor in the Japan Foundation London. In the unit, we introduced Hirosuke Hamada’s children’s story, ‘Naita Akaoni’ (Red Demon Cried), and taught some of Japanese words, manners and cultures through the dramatization of parts of the story. Above all, we focused on exploring one of the important themes in the story: we unpacked a Japanese model of friendship associated with self-sacrifice and in doing so attempted to develop the ability to decenter and critical cultural awareness, which, according to Council of Europe’s language education policies, essential to intercultural understanding.

In my workshop, I am going to introduce a shorter version of this unit. We will dramatize parts of the story and discuss about this Japanese model of friendship associated with self-sacrifice through this process. At the same time, we look at how we can adopt conventions of Japanese traditional theatre within the framework of the English model of drama education.

Norifumi Hida, MFA (East 15, Essex), PhD (Warwick). teaches class struggle, gender, ethnicity and multiculturalism in theatre at Toho Gakuen College of Drama and Music and English language and stories through theatre and drama at Seisen University in Tokyo. As a teaching artist and director of theatre for young audiences, he developed in his most recent production, Hospital Theatre Project 2015, a site-specific multi-sensory theatrical performance for children with disabilities. He was formerly a Research Associate to the MA in Theatre for Young Audiences at Rose Bruford College in London. He is a founding and board member of the Next Generation, ASSITEJ.

 

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #6

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

Panel: A Reflective Practitioner’s Guide to (Mis)Adventures in Drama Education – or – What Was I Thinking? – A Panel Discussion on Reflective Practice

The panelist discussions are based on their contributions to a new edited volume on reflective practice released in June 2015 called, A Reflective Practitioner’s Guide to (mis)Adventures in Drama Education – or – What Was I Thinking? Conceived at the 2012 IDIERI conference in Limerick, Ireland, the book looks at reflective practice not as a series of steps, but as a continual change in perspective. The contributors include: John O’Toole, Pamela Bowell, Brian Heap, Johnny Saldana, Michael Anderson, Julie Dunn, Patrice Baldwin, Allison Manville Metz, Gus Weltsek, Christina Marín, Robert Colby, Juliana Saxton, Christine Hatton, Carmel O’Sullivan, Peter Duffy, Katie Dawson, with a foreword written by Cecily O’Neill and an afterword by David Booth. The purpose of the book is for established theatre educators and practitioners to reflect on a moment in their teaching that went terribly wrong. The “mistake” could be due to an oversight, lack of understanding, lack of preparation, or any number of other causes. The session will not simply be a series of “mess up” stories, but a critical reflection on those so-called mistakes through considering how those moments transformed their practice. Each essay considers the following ideas, the (misguided) incident, the critical analysis of the event, and how the event shaped their future praxis.

Panel members Pamela Bowell, Michael Anderson, Peter Duffy, Gus Weltsek, Christina Marín, Brian Heap, and Christine Hatton will ground their comments in how their reflective practice is guided by the concepts of intuition, emotion and passion. They will share a bit from their chapters and make a few comments on how their work is different due to their reflective/reflexive practice.

Pamela Bowell is Visiting Reader in the School of Culture, Education and Innovation at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln, where she teaches in the Department of Culture and Creative Arts. She is also an active freelance drama and education consultant, workshop leader and author with a deep interest and experience in drama as a means to enable learning. For more than a decade she was Chair of National Drama, the UK’s leading professional association for drama teachers.

Dr. Michael Anderson is Professor (Arts and Creativity) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney. His research and teaching concentrates the role of creativity, the arts (particularly drama) and play have on learning. This work has evolved into a program of research and publication that engages with arts classrooms directly. His recent publications explore how aesthetic education and research is changing learning in the 21st Century. These publications include: Applied Theatre: Research (with Peter O’Connor, Bloomsbury, 2015), Partnerships in Education Research: Creating Knowledge that Matters (with Kelly Freebody, Bloomsbury, 2014), Masterclass in Drama Education (Continuum, UK), Teaching the Screen, Film Education for Generation Next (with Miranda Jefferson), Drama with Digital Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron, Continuum, 2009) and Real Players: Drama, Education and Technology (with John Carroll and David Cameron Trentham, 2006).

See more at: http://sydney.edu.au/education_social_work/about/staff/profiles/michael.anderson.php#st hash.UX6FjcDo.dpuf

Peter Duffy is associate professor and head of the MAT program in theatre education at the University of SC. He works within schools and communities demonstrating how theatre improves learning and teaching. Previous to USC, Peter was Director of Education at the Irondale Ensemble in Brooklyn, NY. Additionally, Peter taught grades 7-12 English, German and Drama for a decade in Maine. He worked as an actor/teacher in New York City schools. He co-edited the book, Youth and Theatre of the Oppressed and edited the newly released A Reflective Practitioner’s Guide to (mis)Adventures in Drama Education – or – What Was I Thinking?

Gustave Weltsek, PhD, Department Chair of Fine Arts and Humanities, IvyTech Community College Bloomington. His work is positioned as multimodal, critically multi-literate arts infusion. His research examines how “Learning” as a critical performative pedagogy (Weltsek and Medina) functions as a tool for social change and academic achievement. Using a critically queered pedagogical lens (Britzman) individual emergent identity within the negotiation of power is situates as language invention connected to institutionalized learning. Work examples  include “Catalyst for Change” which can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QxghXk8Dmg and “Deconstructing global markets through critical performative inquiries in Puerto Rico,” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, Weltsek G., Medina, C. (2013).

Christina Marín, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Performing Arts at Emerson College. She teaches courses in Qualitative Research, Theatre of the Oppressed, Contemporary Issues in Education, and Human Rights in Theatre. She is also the Theatre Teaching Artist-in-Residence for Hyde Square Task Force’s youth theatre troupe ¡ACCIÓN! Community Theatre. She recently directed the inaugural production of Antígona: Las Voces Que Incendian el Desierto for Emerson College’s nascent student production company Raíz Latinoamericana.

Dr. Brian Heap is tenured Senior Lecturer and Head of the Philip Sherlock Centre for the Creative Arts, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, where he has taught and supervised undergraduate and graduate Drama programs for the past 20 years. Brian is internationally recognized as an authority on Process Drama and has an extensive research and publication record in this field. He also engages in consultancy, staff development and project work relating to drama as a pedagogical process and has served in leadership roles nationally and internationally including consultation in drama for Jamaica’s National Curriculum. He was convener of the Fifth International Drama in Education Research Institute in Jamaica in 2006.

Christine Hatton lectures in drama and arts education at the School of Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her research explores gender, identity and technology within drama processes, teaching and research. She is a chief investigator, with Mary Mooney, in the Fresh AiR Initiative Research Study (2014– 2016) funded by Arts NSW, examining the impacts of sustained artists-in-schools residencies, with a focus on the reciprocity of practice between artists, teachers and students. With Sarah Lovesy, she published the book Young at Art: Classroom Playbuilding inPpractice (2009).

 

 

Forum on Educational Theatre Preview #5

Preparations for the Forum on Educational Theatre April 21-24, 2016 are well underway. To register, click here.

As we gear up for the event, we will post descriptions of some of the presentations–one of which appears below:

Narrative: Kiss Me Khatema: An Analysis of Emirati Women’s Responses to Kate’s Final Monologue in Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew

Beginning in 2005 and ending in 2014, and as part of a new educational theatre (TIE) initiative begun with my appointment at the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) in Al-Ain in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), I have included Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew in a course that surveys both Classical and Elizabethan theatre with an emphasis on strong female characters often in conflict with their society’s mores and traditions. As it pertained to an all-female student population of Emirati undergraduates, I was struck by the particular resonance that Kate held for young Arab women; especially in regard to such issues as arranged marriages, a female’s status in society, marital obligations to a father’s dictates and male patriarchy in the home and workplace. This paper/presentation will focus on how these issues coalesce around Kate’s final monologue where she apparently succumbs to Petruchio’s will after resisting for much of the play’s action; most especially when she utters the advice to the assembled women to “…place your hands beneath your husband’s foot.”

Co-Founder of the Creative Arts Team (CAT) in 1974, Dr. James P. Mirrione served as playwright-in-residence for this educational theatre company at New York University. As author of nineteen plays for the company, he established himself as one of the leading writers of Theatre-In-Education (TIE) plays for American audiences.

In 1995, he was commissioned by the United States Information Agency (USIA) to write The Last Enemy, a play for the first Middle East Theatre Company comprised of Palestinians, Jordanians, and Israelis, a company created under Dr. Mirrione’s direction. The play premiered at the United Nations in October of 1998, prior to its first tour in Amman, the West Bank, Tel Aviv, Jaffa, and Haifa.

In addition, he has written for Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Off-Off Broadway as well regional theater. His commissioned plays include The Ghost Café for Carnegie Hall (1992) and The Last Stop, Will and Testament of Saint Jack Kerouac for New York University (1995). He is the 1995 winner of the Spokane Playwrights Festival for his play Area Code 212.
In 2005, Dr. Mirrione joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor at United Arab Emirates University in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences to undertake the implementation of theatre-in-education within the curriculum.
In 2013, Dr. Mirrione was designated as a Special Visiting Professor in Theatre at the University of Nottingham, Ningbo China. He has also taught theatre and conducted theatre projects at the Beijing Dance Academy and Peking University. In 2014, Dr. Mirrione joined the faculty of Qatar University as a Full Professor in the Department of English Literature and Linguistics.