From the Program Director

Time goes by quickly.  It seems like we just started the fall 2012 semester and now we are preparing to graduate many of our students this spring. As the semester comes to a close and I reflect on the academic year, I’m astounded by the quality and depth of student work that has transpired in our educational theatre classrooms and performance spaces, much of which is documented in this blog. Projects that have happened beyond coursework have also been impressive–and inspiring. All one has to do is look back over the numerous Educational Theatre list-serve notices and invitations sent over the last 10 months to find an abundance of theatre activities on display–including applied theatre workshops, play readings, TYA productions, fully produced plays, and many other teaching/learning opportunities and events for which our students have been involved. These reveal an incredible record of collaboration, artistry, diversity and passion within the Educational Theatre community.

While the semester comes to an end, the summer and fall launch new and exciting course possibilities for students who are continuing their studies.  In its 16th year, this summer we are excited to continue our annual New Plays for Young Audiences series at the Provincetown Playhouse in June, as well as the class that accompanies it, Problems in Play Production. Students of our London summer program, being led by Philip Taylor, will have numerous rich experiences, including site visits to Oily Cart and the Conference on Dorothy Heathcote as new additions to the curriculum. Some students will continue on after London and join other Educational Theatre students in our course in Dublin, led by Joe Salvatore, as they study community-engaged theatre. Back on campus, our annual Looking for Shakespeare program continues as Nan Smithner is getting ready to direct Shakespeare’s As You Like It with young people and graduate students helping through their enrollment in the course,Directing Youth Theatre.  There’s still space available for Educational Theatre students to register for this course. In just a couple of weeks, I’ll be the instructor for Teaching Through Drama, where middle school students will come once a week over a three week period to experience drama with the graduate students, one time with special guest Cecily O’Neill leading a drama workshop–and the NYU students will facilitate a drama experience for the young people in week three. There’s also an Acting: Scene Study class to consider, being taught by Amy Cordileone, as well as other summer course offerings. All of the course titles and descriptions are listed on the blog posted on May 3rd (see below), and I want to stress that it’s not too late to register for any of these classes.

What a great year! Congratulations to all who are completing their studies and receiving their degrees.  Your hard work and commitment have contributed to the successful completion of your degree requirements, and more importantly, the Program in Educational Theatre is a better place because we have talented students like you.

Have a wonderful summer everyone!

Sincerely,

David Montgomery, PhD

Director, The Program in Educational Theatre