Steinhardt Study Looks at How Racial Inequality is Produced Online

Internet users tend to navigate between websites in a racially segregated way, despite pathways that provide equitable access to different sites, finds a new NYU Steinhardt study. The findings are published online in the journal Information, Communication, and Society. Discussions about racial inequality on the web have been going on for decades, but few studies [...]

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 NYU ABILITY Project Honored by NYC Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities

Mayor Bill de Blasio and the New York City Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities presented the NYU ABILITY Project with the ADA Sapolin Award in a ceremony yesterday evening at Gracie Mansion. Each year, the Mayor and Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities present four ADA Sapolin Awards, named after Matthew Sapolin, the late [...]

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 Study Finds People with Multiple Sclerosis Experience Challenges Managing Money

Managing money is a complex, cognitively demanding task – which can present a significant challenge for people living with multiple sclerosis. In the first-ever study examining money management in people with the central nervous system autoimmune disease, individuals with multiple sclerosis reported and demonstrated more problems managing money than those without the disease. The findings [...]

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 Do Online Charter Schools Work? Study by June Ahn Looks at Ohio’s E-Schools

A new study from education think tank Thomas B. Fordham Institute, conducted by NYU Steinhardt’s June Ahn, dives into a promising—and contentious—issue in education today: virtual schools. What types of students choose them? Which courses do students take? And do virtual schools improve student outcomes? With over thirty-five thousand students enrolled in its online charter [...]

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 Yoshikawa Leads Consensus Statement on Undocumented Youth and Families

In the United States, 5.3 million children and adolescents are growing up either with unauthorized status or with at least one parent who has that status. Until recently, little research has informed policy debates related to unauthorized status – including those about border enforcement, deportation, and a pathway to citizenship – despite the importance of [...]

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 Wisdom from a Chair: Q&A with Mitchell Batavia

On July 26, 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law, strengthening protections and promoting opportunities and access for people with disabilities. Around the law’s 25th anniversary, Mitchell Batavia, chair of the Department of Physical Therapy, made an unexpected discovery: the unfinished memoirs of his late brother, Andrew (Drew) Batavia. For much of [...]

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