Faculty Profiles

Catherine Moore

Clinical Associate Professor, Music Business

"Every few years the industry changes drastically. This means we need to prepare students for something that doesn't yet exist. This is exciting. It allows us to give students the confidence to innovate."

"There's a very, very valuable connection," says Catherine Moore, "between music and people."

Moore began playing the piano at age seven, organ at 14, and went on to receive a performance degree at the Montreal Conservatoire in Canada, where she was born. After moving to England, Moore answered a newspaper ad looking for someone to run a record store in Liverpool. "I took the job, and that's how I first got into the music business."

Fascination with the dissonant character of Michelangelo Rossi's keyboard pieces led to a PhD and book about his music. Work for independent UK record labels followed, before Moore finally moved to New York City to work as a marketing director for the famed A&M Records.

Today Moore is director of the MA program in Music Business.  "The music business has always been of great interest to me because it's how people get to hear music." The recent digital revolution has made the music business even more integral to connecting people with music, Moore points out. "It's fostered a profound industry transformation. Digital technology is a wonderful, historical preservation tool. At the end of the day it will be proven to be a good thing."

Moore's research addresses these and other controversial changes in the global music industry, including the phenomenon of Internet music sharing. As a professor, Moore seeks to impart her perceptions of the ever-evolving music business by "training people to make business decisions but also artistic decisions. Without both those components music industry professionals won't make the best decisions."

Moore is excited by recent additions to the Program that seek to do just this. An intensive, two-week course at NYU/London called Global Music Management looks at the viability of selling different kinds of music around the world.

There is also Village Records, the Program's undergraduate record label. Recently, they brought out a compilation CD.  "The students, who make all the label's decisions, thought a compilation with different genres of music would help build the name of the label, not to mention disseminate a lot of different kinds of music."

Moore finds her students articulate, confident, united in their passion for music and invested in the success of the music business. Their varied backgrounds tap directly into the global perspective Moore hopes to convey. "I have graduate students from ten different countries, five different continents, and from every undergraduate discipline you could imagine - from animal science to engineering to music. This allows us to do things in the classroom that are phenomenal."

One of those things is to help students think to the future. "Every few years the industry changes drastically. This means we need to prepare students for something that doesn't yet exist. This is exciting. It allows us to give students the confidence to innovate."

Catherine Moore's complete faculty bio.