NYU Steinhardt News

NYU's Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education Wins $2.5 Million NSF Grant

NYU's Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education has won a grant from the National Science Foundation in the amount of $2.5 million for the study titled "IRADS: The Study of Culture, Social Settings, and Child Development across School Transitions." The study is being led by four investigators from NYU Steinhardt's Department of Applied Psychology: Catherine Tamis-LeMonda, professor; Diane Hughes, associate professor; Niobe Way, professor; and Hirokazu Yoshikawa, professor.

Focusing on urban, ethnically-diverse young children and adolescents who are undergoing the transition to formal schooling and high school, respectively, the work will advance research and theory on intersections among developmental domains and social settings. Plans are to follow parallel cohorts of urban, predominantly low-income families of Mexican, Dominican, Chinese, European, and African American descent with young children (4-7 years) and adolescents (13-17 years) as children enter preschool/elementary school and high school. These high-stake transitions entail major psychological adjustment and reorientation in how children relate to their environments.

The research will generate new, culturally grounded theory and knowledge on the development and experiences of children from diverse ethnic backgrounds across multiple developmental domains, social settings, and significant developmental transitions. In the context of the growing diversity among the nation's children, inquiry into the developmental processes and experiences of children from different cultural communities is needed, especially during major transitions.

The proposed research is the continuation of five years of research at NYU's Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education (http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/crcde). To date, approximately 1,300 families of Mexican, Dominican, Chinese, European, and African American descent with infants (birth through age 3 years) and early adolescents (6th through 8th grade) have been studied using ethnographic, survey, semi-structured interview, and observational methods. This work has produced publications, 75 presentations, and dozens of workshops, policy reports, and training sessions to community agencies, councils, schools, and hospitals. Over three dozen ethnically diverse students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty have been actively engaged in the CRCDE, and the proposed IRADS will continue in the tradition of fostering the next generation of scholars to engage in the study of culture and development.