Programs - String Studies

Karen Tuttle Coordination Conference

Program Description Registration | Faculty For More Information | Karen Tuttle in Prague!

Overview

  • Program Dates: June 3 - June 5, 2016
  • Priority Registration Deadline: April 15, 2016
  • Final Registration Deadline: May 7, 2016
    • late applications will be accepted for registrants pending available space and who do not need NYU housing
  • Housing Dates: June 1 - June 7, 2016
  • Cost: 
    • Regular Registration: $345
    • Auditor Registration: $125

Program Description

A workshop style conference for teachers, professionals, and advanced students to explore Karen Tuttle's (1920-2010) teaching principles, namely her physical and emotional approach to the instrument: coordination.

Coordination is the word that Tuttle used to refer to her approach to the instrument. There are many aspects to this, including stance, balancing the instrument, physical releases, musical impulses, and emotional responses to the music. These concepts will be introduced to all of the participants, and all of the teachers will work with the participants to help them learn this approach.

Enrollment is limited to 48 participants so that everyone will be able to play several times in the classes. We will not ask for audition tapes, but suggest that this is not a workshop for beginning or intermediate players. Admission will be on a first come, first served basis.

SCHEDULE
As a reminder, please check into the dorm first if you are staying in housing.
Friday
1-3: Check in at the lobby of 35 West 4th Street
3:30-5:30: Introduction, Room 303
7-9: Master Classes, rooms to be posted 
 
Saturday
10-12: Master Class
1-3: Master Class
3:30-5:30: Master Class
6:00: Banquet
 
Sunday
10-12:30: Kim Kashkashian Master Class
12:30-1: Questions for the faculty 

Registration

Register Now

The conference is open to participants of all ages.

  • 2016 Cost:
    • Regular Registration: $345
    • Auditor Registration: $125
  • 2016 Housing fee (optional): $60 per night, shared room

Please note: the minimum age for NYU housing is 18 years old.

Faculty

Sheila Browne, an American with Irish citizenship, was recently described by The New York Times as “stylish” for her concerto playing at Carnegie-Stern Hall, and Robert Mann of the Juilliard Quartet has said that she “is one of America’s finest violists.” She is a member of the dynamic Fire Pink Trio, made up of flute, harp, and viola. The first viola professor ever to teach in Iraqi Kurdistan, she has played all over the world in many of the major concert halls to critical acclaim. An avid solo and chamber musician, she has performed and recorded with Natalie Cole, Audra MacDonald, Paul Katz, Anton Kuerti, Ruth Laredo, Carol Wincenc, and members of the esteemed Brentano, Guarneri, and Vermeer quartets, and was featured in Michael Tilson Thomas’ PBS documentary Beethoven Alive! Sheila can be heard regularly on public radio stations around the country, live and on CD. Her recently released compact disc of flute quintets with Carol Wincenc on the Bridge label was named CD of the month by Minnesota Public Radio. A passionate proponent of new music, she has  premiered important new works, and has expanded the viola repertoire by transcribing works herself. 

A passionate teacher of viola and chamber music, Sheila was Karen Tuttle’s teaching assistant for four years and Naumburg scholarship student at the Juilliard School as an undergraduate, as well as a graduate student of Kim Kashkashian in Germany, after being awarded a German Academic Exchange Grant (DAAD). She was Karen Ritscher's teaching assistant while attending  Rice University in Paul Katz's Quartet program, and has been in the Arianna, Gotham and Pellegrini String quartets. She has performed and taught at many festivals including Banff, Donaueschingen, Evian, Great Lakes, California Summer Music, Jeunesses Musicales, Kneisel Hall, Music Academy of the West, Tanglewood, and the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq. She is the artist-professor of viola at University of North Carolina School of the Arts, teaching pre-professional residential high schoolers and undergraduate and graduate students. She teaches in the summer at the Montecito International Music Festival and the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival. Videos, sound clips and more information can be found at www.sheilabrowneviola.com and www.firepinktrio.com, and on YouTube.

Susan Dubois is Professor of Viola at the University of North Texas. She was the only viola winner of the Artists International 23rd Annual Auditions, and she was a prizewinner in the Lionel Tertis International Viola Competition. She was formerly with the Rackham Quartet, and has participated in the Marlboro Music Festival and the La Jolla Chamber Music Festival. During the summers, Dubois is on the faculty of Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival, Round Top International Music Festival, and Texas Music Festival. Her teachers have included Karen Tuttle and Donald McInnes.

Jeffrey Irvine joined the faculty of the Cleveland Institute of Music as the Fynette H. Kulas Professor of Viola in September of 1999. He was professor of viola at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music from 1983 to 1999 and was also chair of the string division there from 1992 to 1999. His students have gone on to major orchestral, teaching and chamber music posts across the country and around the world. His students have often been first prize winners in major viola competitions, including the Primrose Competition, the ASTA National Solo Competition, and the Washington International Competition. Irvine has given master classes at major music schools in the United States and in 1985 gave master classes in Beijing and Shanghai. He will join the faculty of the Perlman Music Program in the summer of 2012. He was previously on the faculty of the Heifetz International Music Festival and the Aspen Music Festival. He was formerly a member of the New World String Quartet. His teachers have included Heidi Castleman, Martha Katz, William Primrose, and Karen Tuttle. He is married to violist Lynne Ramsey with whom he has two children, Hannah and Christopher. He plays a viola by Hiroshi Iizuka, made in 1993.

Kim Kashkashian, internationally recognized as a unique voice on the viola, was born of Armenian parents in Michigan. Major influences during her studies were Walter Trampler and Karen Tuttle at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore and at the Marlboro Music Festival where she worked intensively with Felix Galimir. Kashkashian first gained international recognition as recipient of the Pro Musicis award, and as a prize winner in the Tertis and ARD Munich International Competitions, which led to a creative association with the Lockenhaus Festival led by Gidon Kremer. She has appeared as soloist with the major orchestras of Chicago, Cleveland Berlin, Milan, London, Tokyo, and Vienna, working with conductors including Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Zubin Mehta, Riccardo Muti, Christoph Eschenbach, Ricardo Chailly, Dennis Russell Davies, and Franz Welser-Möst. Her recital appearances include the great concert halls of Vienna, Rome, Paris, Berlin, New York, Boston, San Francisco, Cleveland, Philadelphia, and London with her duo partners pianist Robert Levin and percussionist Robyn Schulkowsky. Kashkashian’s quest for new directions and forms of music making is an active element of her musical life. Her work with the composers György Kurtág, Giya Kancheli, Krzysztof Penderecki, Ken Ueno, Betty Olivero, Tigran Mansurian, and Peter Eötvös has extensively enriched the repertoire for viola. She has collaborated with the Tokyo, Guarneri and Orion quartets and toured with a unique quartet which included Daniel Phillips, Gidon Kremer, and Yo Yo Ma. She is a frequent participant at the Ravinia, Marlboro, Salzburg, and Verbier Festivals. After early recordings of Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante and Divertimento with DGG and Sony, an ongoing association with ECM Records has resulted in an extensive discography which includes the award winning Brahms sonatas, the complete Hindemith sonatas, the concertos of Bartók, Eötvös, Kurtág, Berio, Kancheli, Olivero and Mansurian, and Asturiana, songs from Spain and Argentina. Kashkashian resides in Boston and holds a position teaching viola and chamber music at the New England Conservatory of Music. She plays a leading role in the Music for Food project, which raises awareness of the hunger problem faced by a large percent of our population, and gives young musicians the opportunity to experience the powerful role music can play as a catalyst for change.

Michelle LaCourse has appeared as soloist and chamber musician on four continents, including recent performances in Italy, Spain, Brazil, and South Korea. She has performed at numerous festivals such as Aspen, Eastern, Interlochen, Skaneateles, Musicorda, the Heifetz Institute, and the International Festivals of Campos do Jordão, Brazil, of Positano, Italy, and of Vianden, Luxembourg. She was violist of the Lehigh Quartet, the Delphic String Trio and the Aeolian Trio, and was formerly principal violist of the Chamber Orchestra of Grenoble, France, and of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. An enthusiastic advocate for new viola repertoire, she has also commissioned and premiered several new pieces for the instrument. Her recent recording, “Chocolates: Music for Viola and Piano by James Grant” was released by MSR Classics in spring of 2009 to enthusiastic reviews. She is professor of viola and chair of the String Department at Boston University’s School of Music, and was recently awarded BU’s Metcalf Cup and Prize, the university’s highest honor for excellence in teaching. This summer she will teach and perform at BU’s Tanglewood Institute and at the Duxbury Music Festival. Her teachers have included Karen Tuttle, Robert Swan, and David Holland.

Lynne Ramsey, viola, has been first assistant principal violist of The Cleveland Orchestra since 1989, where she holds the Charles and Janet Kimball Chair. She received bachelor of music and master of music degrees from The Juilliard School of Music. Teachers included Karen Tuttle, Ramon Scavelli and David Dawson. She has also been principal violist of the Saint Paul and Rochester Philharmonic Orchestras. She has appeared as soloist with the Cleveland, Saint Paul Chamber, and Air Force String Orchestras; as well as the North Carolina, Baltimore, and Arlington Symphonies. Ramsey was invited to perform the Walton Viola Concerto with the Beijing Philharmonic in China in December 1985 and was the first foreigner to perform in Beijing's new concert hall. She has performed chamber music concerts throughout the U.S. and previously taught at Oberlin Conservatory and the Aspen Music Festival. She was appointed to the CIM faculty in 2001. 

Karen Ritscher, praised by The New York Times for her “superior musicianship,” is recognized internationally as a leading pedagogue, soloist and chamber musician. She has also served as principal violist of the Houston Grand Opera, the Dallas Opera, American Composers Orchestra and the Brooklyn Philharmonic. She has taught at many of the leading conservatories of the United States and her students hold prestigious posts in major orchestras, string quartets, and at universities throughout the world. She is on the viola faculty at the Manhattan School of Music, New York University, Boston University, and City University of New York. She has judged many international competitions, most recently the Primrose, in June of 2011. As a master class clinician and recitalist, she has appeared throughout the United States as well as Canada, Mexico, Spain, Czech Republic, Korea, Taiwan, and China. Her summer residencies have included the Aspen Music Festival, the Heifetz International Institute of Music, Litomisl International Masterclasses in the Czech Republic, and Domaine-Forget in Canada. Since its inception in 2002, she has served on the faculty of the annual Karen Tuttle Coordination Workshop.

Ritscher performs and records with the Azure Ensemble, a new music chamber group based in New York City. She has been a member of the Aureus Piano Quartet, Steve Reich Musicians, and St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble. She has toured and recorded with Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, St. Louis Symphony, New York Philharmonic, and the Houston Symphony. 

As a champion of living composers, Ritscher has commissioned and/or premiered works from many composers including Bruce Adolphe, Alexandra DuBois, Wendy Mae Chambers, Linda Bouchard, Tan Dun, Chen Yi, Bright Sheng, and Alice Shields. She has appeared at seven International Viola Congresses as featured soloist and presenter. 
 
She is honored to have been the string consultant for the award-winning  book by Madeline Bruser, The Art of Practicing; a Guide to Making Music from the Heart. She is the education editor of the Journal of the American Viola Society and a frequent contributor to string magazines.
 
In the spring of 2011, Ritscher became a certified teacher of Gabrielle Roth’s 5Rhythm™ Movement Practice. She teaches Rhythms™ in Boston and New York, as well as workshops throughout the world. See her website at www.karenritscher.com.

Carol Rodland Since making her solo debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra as a teenager, Carol Rodland has established a distinguished international career as a concert and recording artist and pedagogue. Fanfare describes her playing as “delicious…larger than life, sweetly in tune, and infinitely variegated.” A passionate advocate for contemporary music, she has premiered and recorded works by Kenji Bunch, Christopher Theofanidis, and Augusta Read Thomas. Ms. Rodland studied with Karen Tuttle at the Juilliard School and as a Fulbright Scholar with Kim Kashkashian at the Musikhochschule Freiburg. She has held professorships at New England Conservatory, where she was recognized in 2005 with the “Krasner Award for Excellence in Teaching,” at the Musikhochschule “Hanns Eisler” Berlin, at Arizona State University, and as guest faculty at the Juilliard School. She is currently Professor of Viola at the Eastman School of Music. Ms. Rodland is also an artist-faculty member at the Bowdoin International Music Festival, California Summer Music, and the Perlman Music Program. In 2009, she founded “If Music Be the Food…”, a concert series and now national musicians’ movement which raises awareness and support for the hungry. For further information please visit carolrodland.com and ifmusicbethefood.com

For More Information

Program Administration                     

MPAP Summer Programs
35 West 4th Street, Suite 1077
New York, NY 10012
212-998-5438
mpap.summer@nyu.edu

Academic Content 

Stephanie Baer
String Studies Director
35 West 4th Street, Suite 1077
New York, NY 10012 
212-992-9447
stephanie.baer@nyu.edu