History

The Metro Center was born out of an American dream - the dream of achieving equity in public education. Its founder, NYU Professor LaMar P. Miller, had a vision to examine and find solutions for the problems facing the country's public schools, especially as they affect low-income and minority children.

 

Mid-1970s Professor LaMar P. Miller petitioned Dean Griffiths, dean of the New York University School of Education, Health, Nursing, and Arts Professions, to create Metro Center.
1976 Metro Center began operations under a Teacher Corps grant from the U.S. Department of Education
1978 Metro Center formally recognized as a part of SEHNAP
New York University's School of Education, Health, Nursing and Arts Professions
1981 Metro Center establishes Desegregation Assistance Center (Now known in USDOE as the Equity Assistance Centers) created under a $62,000 grant from the U.S. Dept. of Education.
1983 Metro Center, through its newly created executive council, began a tradition of honoring corporate executives for their services to urban youth and schools.  Its first "Torch of Learning Award" was awarded to William M Ellinghaus, president, chief executive officer and director of American Telephone and Telegraph Company.
1984 NYU president, Dr. John Brademas, announces the nation's first Upward Bound Program designed specifically to prepare physically disabled high school students for college. The award was made to Metro Center.
1984 Metro Center began its four decade tracking of the 1954 Supreme Court Decision of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas through a sewries of Nathional Invitational Conferences. Principals in the court decision, Robert L. Carter and Kenneth Clark, were speakers.
1985 Metro Center initiated Stay in School, a 10-year partnership with select New York City Public Schools to help students achieve their full potential
1986 Metro initiates a stay-in-school partnership project at Bushwick, Seward Park, Sarah Hale, and Prospect high schools. Steinhardt School of Education graduate students tutor high school students on a one-to-one basis.
1989 Metro Center produced a television program based on a commissioned committee study: The State of the Black Male in the Public School System.  Lee Daniels, journalist of The New York Times, facilitated the television program.
1991 Metro Center helped design the Teacher Opportunity Corp (TOC) program with the New York State Education Department (NYSED)
1992 Metro Center was awarded a TOC grant to develop a cooperative teacher-training program in collaboration with Brookhaven National Lab and NYU's Dept. of Teaching and Learning in the School of Education.
1994 Metro Center produced "Brown Plus Forty: The Promise," second in a series of National Invitational Conferences tracking Brown v. Board of Education.
1995 The New York Technical Assistance Center (NYTAC), a regional comprehensive center, was founded with funding from the U.S. Department of Education to work with state and local educational agencies providing professional, research-based technical assistance to educators.
1996 Metro Center changed its name from Metropolitan Center for Research and Development and Training to Metropolitan Center for Urban Education.
1997 Metro Center partners with 1199 SEIU Childcare and Youth Services to provide college and career services for students of 1199 members.
1999 Metro awarded a contract to Mount GearUp Program at the Choir Academy in Harlem.
1998-2001 Metro Center was awarded a Safe and Drug-Free Schools data project grant.
2002 John Sexton, president of New York University, recruited Dr. Pedro Noguera from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where Dr. Noguera was the Judith K. Dimon Professor of Communities and Schools.
2004 Metro Center produced "Brown Plus Fifty: A Renewed Agenda for Social Justice," third in a series of national invitational conferences tracking Brown v. Board of Education, dedicated to Judge Robert L. Carter.

Dr. Pedro Noguera named Executive Director of Metro Center.
2005-2006 Metro begins its extended day program to enrich academic achievement for elementary school students.
2006 Metro subcontracts with New York City Department of Education to operate a 5 year Asian Bilingual Technical Assistance Center.
2006 Metro receives a 5 year New York State Contract to operate a Spanish Bilingual Technical Assistance Center.
2006 The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded a landmark, three-year study on Black and Latino males in single-sex schools.
2007 Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank funded APEX Scholars program.
The Adolescent Post-secondary Education Exchange (APEX) Scholars program provides on-site mentoring and a Saturday program to promote college readiness.

The Upward Bound program was funded by U.S. Dept. of Education for an additional five years.
2009 Pedro Noguera appointed Inaugural Chair Peter Agnew Professor.
2009 June 2009, funding was received from Ford Foundation, Victoria Foundation, and Predential Foundation to develop an initiative, Broad Bolder Approach, in Newark, NJ.
2010 The Nathan Cummings Foundation supports the establishment of a Hip Hop Education Program at Metro Center.
2011 The Newark Education Trust cites NYU’s Metro Center’s initiatives in Newark (Newark Global Village Zone) on its list for top 11 for 2011.
2012 Pedro Noguera announces a name change for Metro Center, “that more accurately reflects the future and current work of this center.” The center is renamed as Metropolitan center for Research, Practice, and Educational Equity (Metro Center).
2012 Metro receives a 5 year contract to develop and operate a liberty partnership program to provide services to high school students who are at risk of dropping out of school and to motivate students to complete high school and to seek entry into postsecondary institutions.
2013 Dr. Noguera expands the Center's reach by inviting faculting partners to join the Center.
2013 The Metro Center expands its focus to include work on the international level.
2013 Professor Pedro Noguera partners with Professor Hirokazu Yoshikawa to codirect The Institute on Global Education.