Department of Humanities and Social Sciences in the Professions

Global and Urban Education

Global and Urban Education Studies Minor

This 16-credit interdisciplinary minor in Global and Urban Education Studies introduces students from across New York University to critical social, cultural, economic, political, legal and policy issues in education. Courses examine the role of education not only in American society but also in international contexts, both urban and non-urban. 

This minor is appropriate for students considering careers and/or further study in education, including:

Through elective courses, students choose to focus on one of two options:

Urban Education

This option includes courses that engage with questions of funding, equity, urban youth identities, organization and governance of urban schools, development and implementation of policies and practices, and multicultural and multilingual education. 

Global Education

This option examines social, cultural, and economic aspects of globalization and their implications for the field of education. Courses examine various topics as they relate to education, including notions of international human rights standards and principles, the emergence of global markets, new information technologies, migration, and comparative studies of socialization, race, class, gender and sexuality in educational contexts.

Curriculum

A: Required Core Course: 

HSED-UE.1005/HIST-UA.0060 Introduction to Education
Offered by the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

In this course, students engage with central themes, issues, and controversies in education, such as:

B:  Restricted electives:

Choose one of the following four restricted electives (4 credits):

Urban Education
SOCED-UE.238: Urban Schools in Crisis: Policy Issues and Perspectives
TCHL-UE.41: American Dilemmas: Race, Inequality, and the Unfulfilled Promises of Public Education
Offered by the Department of Teaching and Learning

OR           

Global Education
INTE-UE.10 Introduction to Global Education
INTE-UE.11 Globalization and Education
Offered by the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences

C: Unrestricted Electives (By Advisement)

Choose at least 8 credits from the following options, as well as others by advisement:

Urban Education

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences
SOED-UE.20 American Social Movements, 1950 – Present: Power, Resistance, Identity (4 credits)
SOED-UE.1025 The Sociology of Urban Life and Education (3 credits)
SOED-UE.1050 LGBT Topics in Education: Identities, Coming Out, and Current Issues in Schools (4 credits)
HSED-UE.610 Education and the American Dream: Historical Perspectives (4 credits)
APSTA-UE.10 Statistical Mysteries and How to Solve Them(4 points)

Department of Media, Culture, and Communication
MCC-UE.1017 Youth Media and Social Change (4 credits)

Department of Applied Psychology
APSY-UE.5 Community Psychology (4 credits)
APSY-UE.1040 Students in the Community: Service, Leadership and Training  (2 credits)
APSY-UE.1270 Social Intervention in Schools and Communities (4 credits)
APSY-UE.1278 Families, Schools and Child Development (4 credits)

Department of Teaching and Learning
ENGED-UE.1205 Hip Hop and the Teaching of English (3 credits) 

Wagner School of Public Service
UPADM-GP.219 Race, Class, & Gender in American Cities (4 credits)

Silver School of Social Work
UNDSW-US.68 Service Learning through Community Engagement (2 credits)
UNDSW-US.72 Service Learning with Refugee Youth (2 credits)

Gallatin School of Individualized Study
CLI-UG 1460 Literacy in Action (4 credits)

College of Arts and Science
SCA-UA.115 Introduction to Black Urban Studies (4 credits)
SCA-UA.541 Latino Youth:  Migration & Policing in the Americas (4 credits)
SCA-UA.613 Community Empowerment (4 credits)
SCA-UA.751 Urban Economics (4 credits)
SCA-UA.610 Law and Urban Problems (4 credits)
HIST-UA.639 New York City: A Social History (4 credits)
SOC-UA.137 Wealth, Power, Status: Inequality in Society (4 credits)
SOC-UA.415 Education and Society (4 credits)
SOC-UA.460 Cities, Communities, and Urban Life (4 credits)
SOC-UA.465 Childhood (4 credits)
PSYCH-UA 9036 Community Psychology (4 credits) *

Global Education

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences
HSED-UE.1028 Schooling in Diverse Societies* (4 credits)
HSED-UE.1061 History of Higher Education (4 credits)
INTE-UE.1010 International Human Rights Activism and Education (4 credits)
INTE-UE 1011  Billionaires, Best Intentions, and Public Education (4 credits)
INTE-UE 1012 God ,Schools and the Globe  (4 Credits)
INTE-UE 1141 Justice, Reason, and Culture (4 credits)
INTE-UE.1532 Terrorism, Extremism and Education (4 credits)
INTE-UE.1545 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the New Immigration (4 credits)
INTE-UE.1xxx Contemporary International Relations: Peace, Security, and Education (4 credits)**
INTE-UE.1xxx International Perspectives On Gender and Education (4 credits)**
PHED-UE.10 Learning and the Meaning of Life
PHED-UE 1016 Religion/Public Education in the International Context
SOED-UE.1015 Education as a Social Institution (4 credits)
SOED-UE.1214 Education and Development in Latin America (4 credits)
SOC-UA.9415 Sociology of Education: Global Education in the 21st Century (4 credits)***

Silver School of Social Work
UNDSW-US.68 Service Learning through Community Engagement (2 credits)
UNDSW-US.72 Service Learning with Refugee Youth (2 credits)

College of Arts and Science
ECON-UA.323 Economic Development (4 credits)

* course is offered at NYU Accra
** course is in development
***course is offered at NYU Berlin

Course Offerings*:

TCHL-UE 41 American Dilemmas: Race, Inequality, and the Unfulfilled: This course provides students with background on the historical and sociological foundation of education in the United States. It examines the role that education has played in advancing civil and human rights It explores the ways in which education continues to be implicated in the maintenance of social inequality in American society. Through readings, lectures, films, and class debates, students will gain an understanding of some of the most complex and controversial issues confronting education today including: affirmative action, bilingual education, special education, the achievement gap, school choice and vouchers, and the role of race and culture in student achievement.

INTE-UE 10 Introduction to Global Education: This survey course offers an introduction to the field of global education. Education in the 21st century is undoubtedly a central area for international collaboration as well as contestation. In this survey course, we will examine key debates about the role of education in national and international society, examining the multiple stake holders that work to improve education globally, and their diverse interpretations of that mandate. The course will introduce students to the history of mass education as a global phenomenon, and the comparative ways in which it is now studied. Students will examine both K-12 and higher education. This is a liberal arts core/CORE equivalent that satisfies the requirement for Society and Social Sciences.

SOED-UE 1015 Education as Social Institution: Part of the common pedagogical core, this course provides an introduction to the social foundations of education. The structure of education in terms of the rights and responsibilities of teachings, administrators, community members and policy makers in relation to the rest of the society are explored from both legal and sociological credits of view. Comparisons with education and schooling in other countries are made. The study of particular school and professional issues includes diversity, student variability, bilingualism, and special education in terms of their effects on policy, practice, and student and teacher rights.

HSED-UE 610 Educ/American Dream: Historical Perspectives: The course will examine historical perspectives on the relationship between public schooling and the promotion of democratic ideals. Students will explore some of the central goals and purposes of American public education over the past two centuries, and the historiographical debates about those goals and purposes. In the second half of the course, students will the relationship between schooling and civic education, and between schooling and specific communities, in order to ask whether the goals of schooling might promote or contradict the goals of particular groups who seek to benefit from public education, and ways in which education does not promote democratic ideals. This is a liberal arts core/CORE equivalent that satisfies the requirement for Society and Social Sciences.

HSED-UE 1033 Culture Wars in America: This course will examine the origins, development, and meanings of so-called cultural conflict in the United States. Topics will include abortion, gay rights, bilingualism, and the teaching of evolution in public schools. This is a liberal arts core/CORE equivalent that satisfies the requirement for Society and Social Sciences.

HSED-UE 1067 History of Higher Education: Discussions of selected topics in the social and intellectual history of higher education in America since 1750. Integration of educational policies and functions, with attention to limitations of educational responsibility, development of institutional structures, changing modes for gaining and imparting knowledge, and the social prerogatives and initiatives variously assigned to an educated class.

PHED-UE 10 Learning and The Meaning of Life: What is the most important thing to which I should be devoting my life? This course explores the existential concerns animating questions like this, ones that inspire our lifelong, liberal learning. It focuses on classic works in Western philosophy, literature, and film and examines them as texts of education. Class meetings will be devoted to a mix of lecture and discussion. This is a liberal arts core/CORE equivalent that satisfies the requirement for Texts and Ideas. 

PHED-UE 1016 Religion/Public Ed In International Context: The purpose of this course on religion and public education in an international context is for us to engage together in a critical analysis of what continues to be an important contemporary issue. The seminar is designed especially for students preparing for careers in teaching – in both public and private/religious schools, educational administration, educational research, or other professions which will involve them in the ongoing public debates about the uneasy relationship of religion and public education in the United States and other countries. The course will examine these issues historically and in terms of current policy debates and students will be asked to make connections to their own educational practice. This is a liberal arts core/CORE equivalent that satisfies the requirement for Context and Cultures.

APSY-UE 1014 Educational Psychology: Overview of major areas in psychology that are critical to education; discussion of concepts and principles fundamental to the learning process and their application to teaching.

APSY-UE 1270 Social Intervention in Schools and Communities: This course will introduce students to issues in the design, implementation and evaluation of social interventions aimed at addressing social problems such as delinquency, lags in early learning, youth unemployment, poverty and its effects on human development, and so on. Students will become familiar with a range of problems and programs, and will study one program in depth across the semester with a small team of classmates.

ENGED-UE 1205 Hip Hop and The Teaching of English: Examines ways that hip hop culture, texts, and language exists as valuable resources worthy of serious study in secondary English classrooms. Students will learn to teach English by learning hip hop, learning about hip hop, and learning through hip hop. Group projects focus on grounded investigations in the area of critical literacy, sociolinguistics, and English language arts teaching/learning. Readings will cover divergent voices in contemporary society as students consider ways to integrate such voices into existing language and literacy curriculums, K through college.

UNDSW-US 68 Service Learning Through Community Engagement: This course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity on the Lower East Side. Students will provide tutoring for K-12 youth and/or adult learners from disadvantaged backgrounds at the University Settlement House. This course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity on the Lower East Side. Students will provide tutoring for K-12 youth and/or adult learners from disadvantaged backgrounds at the University Settlement House. The accompanying course will offer broad and general content related to students' service experiences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experiences.

UNDSW-US 72 Service Learning With Refugee Youth: This weekly one-hour course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity with refugees. Emphasis will be placed on students. understanding of the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. Students will learn about immigration and resettling refugees. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture, and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experience. As part of their community service they will provide academic coaching and mentoring for refugees from such nations as Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Burma, Moldova, Uganda, and Sudan for a minimum of two hours weekly at Brooklyn International High School (Tuesdays or Wednesdays from 2:30-4:30 p.m.).

SOC-UA 460 Cities, Communities, and Urban Life: Introduction to urban sociology. Historical development of American cities and theories about cities. Ongoing processes of urban community life. Are cities sites of individual opportunity and rich communal life, or are they sources of individual pathology and community decline? What social, economic, and political factors promote one outcome or the other? How do different groups fare in the urban context, and why?

CLI-UG 1460 Literacy in Action: This course combines volunteer work in New York City adult literacy and English as a second language programs with an academic introduction to the philosophy, history, and current issues of adult literacy. An important emphasis of the class is to critically examine adult literacy through a social justice lens. Students will work as volunteer teachers of reading and writing oral English or mentors at such institutions as the University Settlement, International Rescue Committee, Turning Point, and Fortune Society. In class they will read about and discuss such key issues as adult literacy education policy and the impact on the field—including instruction, implications of being marginalized by educational systems, instructional approaches developed for adults and the steps that might be taken to build support for high-quality, adult basic-skills programs.

*To see an up to date listing of current course offerings, please refer to the Albert course search.