Colloquia

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Date Speaker Affiliation
Oct 25, 2011
12 - 1 pm
Sharon Weinberg & Lisa Stulberg
Book Reception
NYU
Nov. 22, 2011
12-1:15 pm
Alan Sadovnik Professor of Education, Sociology, and Public Affairs, Rutgers University - Newark
Nov. 29, 2011
12-1:15 pm
Aaron Benavot Professor of Global Education Policy, University at Albany, SUNY
Feb. 28, 2012 12-1:15 pm Cathryn Magno Associate Professor of Education Leadership and Policy Studies, Southern
Connecticut State University
 Mar. 28, 2012 12-1:15 pm Lorena S. Walsh & Peter Walsh Historians
Apr. 3, 2012 (12-1:15 pm) John B. King, Jr. New York State Education Commissioner


WHO:   Sharon Weinberg & Lisa Stulberg
WHEN:  Tuesday October 25, 2011 (12 – 1 pm)
WHERE:  246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC: Book reception: Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach (Routledge, 2011).


WHO:  Alan Sadovnik, Professor of Education, Sociology, and Public Affairs, Rutgers University - Newark
WHEN: Tuesday November 22, 2011 (12 – 1:15 pm)
WHERE:  246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC: “A Gift Horse Whose [Mouth] and Face(book) Deserve Scrutiny: Will Mark Zuckerberg's $100 Million Gift Improve Education in Newark?


WHO: Aaron Benavot, Professor of Global Education Policy, University at Albany, SUNY
WHEN:  Tuesday November 29, 2011 (12 – 1:15 pm)
WHERE:  246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC: Learning to read and numerate in the developing world: Cross-national commonalities and differences in curriculum.
REPORT: 


WHO:  Cathryn Magno, Associate Professor of Education Leadership and Policy Studies, Southern Connecticut State University
WHEN:  Tuesday February 28, 2012 (12 – 1:15 pm)
WHERE:   246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC: “Sight Unseen: Viewing and 'Re-Viewing' Images of Girls' Education"

In her talk, Prof. Magno will draw from her recent article in Girlhood Studies, a related policy paper for UNICEF, and a third article in Compare. An abstract is below.

Cathryn Magno (PhD, Columbia University) is currently Associate Professor at Southern Connecticut State University, where she teaches Master’s and Doctoral courses such as education policy, social equity, leadership theory, program evaluation, and qualitative research methods. Her research interests address the politics of education, particularly pertaining to comparative education and policy borrowing, human rights and social change, race and gender analysis, migration, and visual analysis methodology. As a practitioner, she continues to advance educational rights through consultancies with UNICEF, USAID, the International Rescue Committee and the Open Society Institute.


ABSTRACT: 
 The ways in which images of girls are used and understood to represent broader international development discourses related to girls’ education are found in the themes of this article.  This piece was originally written as a policy report for the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI),[i] conceived with UNICEF out of their interest in determining whether the images they produce accurately represent the policies and processes they engage in on behalf of girls and girls’ education worldwide; that report served as UNICEF’s contribution to the UNGEI partnership.  A qualitative approach, through which a series of images by partner agencies, with particular focus on UNICEF images, were interrogated in several focus group discussions, allowed for the emergence of themes related to surface, intended, and oppositional readings of the images themselves as well as policy considerations vis-à-vis image use.  Questions related to girls’ positions in relation to boys, to each other, and to the larger society arose as participants reacted to the impacts of elements in the photographs such as educational symbols, subjects’ movement, age, and need for special protection, among others.  The premise that visual culture and visual analysis is an important avenue to study the culture of girlhood was reified in this study which revealed the many deep and sometimes conflicting meanings and interpretations placed on images by diverse viewers.

[i] The United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI) is a partnership of organizations dedicated to promoting girls’ education. It embraces the United Nations system, governments, donors, NGOs, civil society, the private sector, communities and families. UNICEF serves as the lead agency and secretariat. For more information, visit www.ungei.org.


WHO:  Lorena S. Walsh and Peter Walsh, Historians
WHEN:  March 28, 2012 (12-1:15pm)
WHERE:   246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC:  Teaching in Tanzania
BIO: Lorena S. Walsh was for twenty-seven years a historian at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, Virginia. She is author of Motives of Honor, Pleasure, and Profit: Plantation Management in the Colonial Chesapeake, 1607-1763 (UNC Press), From Calabar to Carter's Grove: The History of a Virginia Slave Community (University of Virginia Press) and coauthor of Robert Cole's World: Agriculture and Society in Early Maryland (UNC Press).

For a decade, Lorena and her husband Peter taught as volunteer instructors at Tumaini University in Iringa, Tanzania. Join us for an informal conversation about their remarkable experiences teaching abroad and observing the growth, successes, and struggles of this new university. (You can read more about these experiences here).

 

 WHO:  John B. King, Jr., New York State Education Commissioner
WHEN:  April 3, 2012 (12-1:15 pm)
WHERE:  246 Greene Street, 3rd Floor
TOPIC: TBA