History in the Classroom

About The History in the Classroom Project

History in the Classroom

This website, produced by the History in the Classroom Project, is designed for social studies teachers who are teaching American history. The History in the Classroom Project is a federally funded collaborative professional development program for high school and middle school teachers, a partnership between New York City's Department of Education, the Social Studies Program of New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, the History department of New York University, and the New York Historical Society.

Addressing both historical content and pedagogical strategies, the program offers two semester-long sessions of study: a summer institute and an in-school support for teachers and administrators in selected Schools In Need of Improvement (SINI). Additional engaging lectures, discussions, and field experiences are also offered to further support participating teachers' development. Our goal is to improve the teaching of American history by linking public school teachers to the world of historical scholarship, connecting teachers to leading historians, and working collaboratively to produce historically rich and intellectually engaging lessons for public school social studies students. A central goal of the project is to assist teachers in high need (SINI) schools in Community School Districts, 1, 2, 4 and 7 in their US history teaching. To learn more about the History in the Classroom Project, please contact Ann-Marie Weathers, Project Director - New York City Department of Education: Aweathers@schools.nyc.gov.

Our goal is to improve the teaching of American history by linking public school teachers to the world of historical scholarship, connecting teachers to leading historians and working collaboratively to produce historically rich and intellectually engaging lessons for public school social studies students. A central goal of the project is to assist teachers in high need (SINI) schools in Community School districts 1, 2, 4 and 7 in their US history teaching.

Our website is designed to provide teachers with access to the many resources that have been generated by The History in the Classroom Project, including primary sources, lectures given by leading historians at our summer institute, classes, and ongoing workshops. Also included are lesson plans drawn up by the teachers who have participated in those sessions. Last summer's institute focused on the history of immigration so you will find some very useful material on this site concerning immigrant history, which we hope will assist you as you teach this important subject.

In the 2011-2012 academic year we had some outstanding speakers on the 1960s -- including Marilyn Young on Vietnam, Linda Gordon on the women's movement, Frances Fox Piven on the welfare rights movement, Robert Pratt on the NAACP, the courts, and desegregation, Stanley Nelson on his documentary film on the Freedom Rides, and Calvin Trillin on his experiences covering the civil rights movement as a journalist. You will find videos of their talks on this website.

We also held at NYU a conference on the 50th anniversary of the Port Huron Statement, the founding document of Students for a Democratic Society -- which was central to the student movement of the 1960s. Videos of all those conference sessions are available on this website. The session on Teaching the Port Huron Statement, featuring Tom Hayden who drafted it and fellow SDS founder Al Haber, will be of special interest to teachers since it was deigned for high school teachers. There are also lesson plans on Teaching the Port Huron Statement, a comic book history on Port Huron and the student movement of the 1960s.

If you would like more information on any of these materials or on the History in the Classroom Project, or if would like us to post on our website lessons you developed using the resources on this site, please contact me.

Robert Cohen
Professor of Social Studies
NYU Department of Teaching and Learning
Affiliated Professor NYU History Department