Committee on Courses and Programs

Summary of New Courses and Programs Approved (listed by Meeting Date)

  • Programs 2012-3

    5/29/13

    The Department of Physical Therapy
    Rehabilitation Studies
    Ph.D. program in Rehabilitation Studies

    Courses 2012-2013

    The Department of Administration, Leadership & Technology

    Educational Communication and Technology

    12/5/12

    AMLT –GE-2063 Field-Based Project on South Africa’s Reforms

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    The course provides students with an opportunity to study a topic of interest relevant to social transformation and educational reform in South Africa. The first part covers the practical side of identifying appropriate study topics and sites for their projects. The second part is the actual field based project where students work with/meet/interview those in the setting, culminating in a formal paper on their experiences and what they have learned.

    Student Personnel Administration in Higher Education

    5/29/13

    HPSE-GE.2xxx The Transition from High School to College

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    This course exposes students to the various issues, trends, research, and practice related to the high school to college transition. There is a social justice framework guiding much of the materials assigned and discussed to expose students to the various realities impacting specific student populations. The materials in this course focus on American educational institutions and trends.

    The Department of Applied Psychology

    Applied Psychology

    5/29/13

    APSY-GE.2205 Conflict Analysis and Resolution

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    Conflict is an important part of our daily lives. Conflict is omnipresent in interpersonal relationships, workplace, national and international affairs, etc. In this class we will examine theories and research that help us understand the nature and roots of conflict, its evolution, and strategies that lead to its resolution. The first part of the course will focus on roots and dynamics of conflict, whereas the second part will focus on strategies to resolve conflict. Students will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in this class to conflicts at different levels: interpersonal, organizational, community, and international.

     

    The Department of Art and Art Professions

    Art Theory and Critical Studies

    2/6/13

    ARTCR-UE.152/LIBAR-UE.943 The Internet and Contemporary Art

    60 hrs, 4 credits

    The Post-Internet mentality - where the Internet is a way of creating and thinking, more than a device - is the basis for this class on contemporary digital art, 1970 to the present.  This course looks at current Internet art; video, digital, virtual and mixed technology, and collaborative online art practices.  Students will learn how artists are integrating digital technology in the production, display, and public encounter of their artwork. Lectures using images of art and assigned readings will focus on online and digital realities, the Internet as an art medium, contemporary time prosumers, digerati, online social networks, screen mentalities, spectatorship, and new visual formations. Visiting artists and critics will engage virtually and in person so students will be in direct contact with those creating the current landscape of Internet art.

     

    The Department of Humanities and Social Sciences in the Professions

    Education and Jewish Studies

    3/13/13

    EJST-GE.2007 Israel Education in Flux

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    The course investigates recent educational and research efforts regarding “Israel Education” – the teaching and learning about Israel aimed at American Jews. We will examine longstanding debates and tensions in this field, as well as the new developments and directions in a variety of sectors, including day schools, travel tours (like birthright), Israel studies in the university. We will develop a critical, analytic perspective about this important case of transnational education.

    Inter-Departmental Research Studies

    5/29/13

    RESCH-GE.2xxx Advanced Data Analysis in Health and Policy Research: Survival Analysis

    30 hrs, 2 credits

    This course is a second year course in advanced statistical techniques that introduces basic concepts and methods for analyzing survival time data obtained by tracking individuals until occurrence of an event or their loss to follow-up (e.g., time to death or degree). Assuming a strong foundation in regression and the inferential statistics, this course will cover nonparametric, semiparametric and parametric survival models that are commonly seen in health and policy studies. Students will also learn discrete time event history models, which are useful tools in longitudinal data analysis. Examples in this course include assessing risk factors for time to death among heart transplant patients, and risk factors for juvenile delinquency.

    RESCH-GE.2xxx Advanced Data Analysis in Health and Policy Research: Linear Models

    30 hrs, 2 credits

    This course is a second year course in advanced statistical techniques that covers useful quantitative tools in health and policy research.  Assuming a strong foundation in regression and the general linear model, this course focuses on data analysis that utilizes models for categorical, discrete or limited outcomes that are commonly seen in health and policy studies.  Examples include health status, number of clinic visits, etc.  In this course students will also learn the principles of likelihood-based inference, which will assist them in some of the more advanced statistics courses.

    Philosophy of Education

    5/29/13

    PHED-UE.1xxx Religion and Public Education in an International Context

    35 hrs, 3 credits

    The purpose of this course is to engage in a critical analysis of the ongoing public debates about the uneasy relationship of religion and public education in the United States and other countries, which treat the relationship of religion and schooling very differently. A prime goal of the course is to understand the American commitment to the separation of church and state in a more sophisticated way in light of examining nations in which not only the study of religion but devotional activities are a required part of the school day and others in which virtually any mention of religion is excluded from schools. 

    Sociology of Education 

    5/29/13 

    SOED-GE.2373 Gender and Inequality: The Role of Schools

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    This course will cover issues concerning gender and inequality in education from early childhood to post-secondary education including professional schools with an emphasis on what happens to the success of girls in the elementary and secondary school settings once they enter post-secondary and graduate/professional education as well as the workforce. The topics include how schools have historically shortchanged female students even after mass coeducation in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s and the passage of Title IX; single-sex education for females and for males at the primary, secondary and post-secondary levels; the differences between coeducation and mixed-sex education; legal issues and gender equality in education; and how gender, race, and class come together in schools.


    The Department of Media, Culture, and Communications

    Media Culture and Communications

    10/3/12

    MCC-GE.2155 Activist Art and Creative Activism

    40 hrs, 4 credits

    The course will focus on the tactical, strategic, and organizational uses of artistic aesthetic taken up by the activist for the purpose of social change. The course will rely on both a survey of the existing theory and scholarship on “artistic activism,” as well as close analysis of contemporary practices on a local, national and global scale. Special attention will be paid to issues of creativity and efficacy, addressing questions concerning the value of this hybrid practice as both an aesthetic and political activity.

    MCC-UE.1031 Digital Literacy

    45 hrs, 4 credits

    This course offers students a foundational understanding of the technological building blocks that make up digital media and culture, and of the ways they come together to shape myriad facets of life. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the key concepts behind coding, and survey the contours of digital media architecture, familiarizing themselves with algorithms, databases, hardware, and similar key components. These technological frameworks will be examined as the basic grammar of digital media and related to theories of identity, privacy, policy, and other pertinent themes.

    12/5/12

    MCC-UE.1302 Global Television

    40 hrs, 4 credits

    This course introduces students to theories of global television studies, the reception of American media abroad, and several case studies of television from around the world. Students will learn about the challenges and rewards of studying global television, both of which revolve around how to study television programming and the television industry across cultures and across languages.

    MCC-UE.1409 Consumption, Culture, and Identity

    40 hrs, 4 credits

    This course offers students the opportunity to engage with theories of communication and culture through the context of consumption and contemporary consumer society. Our focus will be on the role of commodities and consumer practices in everyday life and in culture at large. We will give particular attention to consumption’s role in the construction of social and cultural identities. Students will consider critical responses to consumer culture, including the resistance and refusal of consumption as well as the attempted mobilization of consumption toward social change.

    2/6/13

    MCC-UE.1762 Culture and Media Geography of Commodities: Coffee

    45 hrs, 4 credits

    This is an umbrella course, which will focus on different commodities such as coffee, tea, sugar, oil, and cotton. We will investigate the cultural geography of a specific commodity, assessing historical and contemporary issues that inform modes of production and development of international or domestic trade. The subtopic will vary. Students will work as a team to produce a project that analyzes the intricacies of the specific commodity studied in the course. The course will include on-the-ground research and site visits.

    4/17/13

    MCC-UE.1416/LIBAR-UE.0594 Borders, Barriers, and Buffers

    45 hrs, 4 credits

    The course begins with the paradoxical premise that we increasingly live in a borderless world thanks in large part to the advent of new technologies which allow for the flow of goods, capital, people, and ideas; but that we also simultaneously live in a more barricaded world made up of walls, barriers, and borders of different kinds. Students will think through political and symbolic borders and their material and immaterial formations. Readings which draw on examples from across the world will be included throughout the course. The course will culminate with a trip to Israel/Palestine.

    5/29/13

    MCC-GE.2xx The Racial Web

    40 hrs, 4 credits

    Students will examine the sources, content, and flow of racial and racialized discourse on the web, as well as a broader variety of issues related to race and digital media. Central themes of racial formation and critical race theory, coupled with foundational concepts from graph theory and social network analysis will guide explorations into the multifaceted ways in which racial disadvantage, exclusion, segregation and disparate treatment get produced and reproduced in cyberspace.


    The Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions

    Dance Education

    12/5/12

    MPADE-GE.2025 Hip Hop Dance Technique and Pedagogy

    45 hrs, 1-3 credits

    Exploration of the vernacular and theatrically influenced forms of Hip Hop dance including but not limited to Breaking, Popping, Locking and Krumping and identifying commonalities and differences within the Hip Hop practices. Focusing on the historical and cultural context and its importance to education in the various schools of dance sectors, students will experience pedagogical approaches, along with approaches to technique, improvisation and cognitive content. Classes will be conducted to Hip Hop, house and dance music from the past three decades. Classes will be begin with a set warm-up and follow with stretching and conditioning exercises. Depending on the week’s focus, there will be across-the-floor progression series and practice techniques of that week’s particular hip-hop dance form. Class will always conclude with a combination that incorporates that week’s dance form and other hip-hop dance forms.

    Educational Theater

    3/13/13

    MPAET-GE.2110 Devised Theatre Theory and Technique

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    Through scholarly discussions, introduction of techniques, and resource sharing, students will explore a broad range of theories and methodologies of devised theatre. Through readings, students will investigate experimental, avant-garde and postmodern performance theory and develop an in-depth understanding of dramatic and narrative structures, which outline how collective and contemporary theatrical art has been conceived, produced and managed. The course will culminate in developing new work for a Devised Theatre Showcase.

    5/29/13

    MPAET-UE.1xxx Introduction to Theatre History

    45 hrs, 3 credits

    Students will explore the general development of world theatre and dramatic literature, and become familiar with major movements, styles, theories, and plays from ancient times to the present. Due to the lengthy time span of theatre history covered, this introductory course cannot be all-inclusive, but will focus on pertinent periods of theatre, and select plays that are representative of significant periods that will be studied.  Students will also be able to research specific topics in the writing of research papers and group class presentations.

    MPAET-UE.1xxx Senior Seminar in Educational Theatre

    60 hrs, 4 credits

    This course serves as the culminating experience for undergraduate students

    completing a bachelor of science degree in Educational Theatre.  Each student will create and present an individual capstone project in one of three concentration areas: Theatre Performance and Production, Applied Theatre, or Drama in Education. Through seminar discussions, written assignments, presentations, and performances, students will demonstrate how their course work and practical experiences have contributed to this final culminating project.  Students will also explore potential career options and academic pursuits upon the completion of the degree.

    Music Technology

    12/5/12

    MPATE-GE.2617 C Programming for Music Technology Lab

    10 hrs, 1 credit

    A one-credit course that is taken in parallel with MPATE-GE 2618, a graduate-level introductory course in C programming for audio and music applications.  The lab covers programming concepts including software design, algorithms, and data representation for digital signal processing and other audio applications. No prior programming experience is required.

    5/29/13

    MPATE-GE 2XXX Ear Training for Audio Engineers

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    This course will examine theories and techniques related to analyzing recorded and environmental sounds. Students will sharpen listening skills with comprehensive ear training exercises and guided critical listening explorations. Topics include frequency discrimination, reverberation, dynamics, distortion, sonic effects, sound ecology and other related topics.

     

    The Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health

    Nutrition and Food

    10/3/12

    FOOD-GE.2030 Introduction to Urban Agriculture

    28 hrs, 2 credits

    This course provides a practical introduction to urban agriculture. Students will learn horticultural skills while performing tasks at the NYU Urban Farm Lab. They will also learn about the biological processes that these tasks manage and how they fit together in a system. Through visits to other sites around the city, students will be exposed to a wide variety of strategies for practicing horticulture in the urban environment.

    4/17/13

    FOOD-GE.2007 Food Economics I:  Consumer Behavior

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    The goal of the course is to analyze the consumer side of food markets and related policy using tools of microeconomic analysis.  In the first half of the course, theoretical tools are developed, starting from individual choice and moving up to market demand.  In the second part of the course, the focus shifts to applications of consumer economic theory in the food system, and how policies can alter consumer behavior.

    FOOD-GE.2039 Food Policy and Politics

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    The course deals with how governments—particularly that of the United States—design and implement policies and programs to foster social goals such as ensuring a sufficient, safe, affordable, and sustainable food supply.  It examines why and how governments do or do not decide to set policies; reviews how stakeholders in the food system become involved in and influence policy development; identifies the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence stakeholder and government positions on policy issues; and describes the ways in which these factors promote or act as barriers to policies aimed at promoting the health of people and the planet.

    FOOD-GE.2040 Food Advocacy

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    Food advocacy uses sociological methods to question how and why social groups—families, institutions, governments--affect and are affected by systems of food production and consumption, how these systems affect the environment and human health, and how individuals and groups can influence and improve food systems. Today, interest in such issues is so widespread that efforts to improve food systems are considered by some to constitute a social movement.  Food advocacy seeks to describe this movement, and to explore how individuals and groups can effect change in the food system.

    5/29/13

    FOOD-GE.2xxx Economics of Food II: Form Strategic Behavior

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    The course provides students with an intermediate level understanding of the microeconomics of firm or business behavior, and to apply these tools to current policy issues in the food system. Students explore the effect of firm decision-making on size, scale, and scope, and apply the tools to firms in the food sector. A range of outcomes is explored: free market, firm self regulation, socially responsible firm behavior, shared value firm behavior, and government regulation. The course is designed for policy and food interested students with little as well as no background in economics, or for those who have completed an introductory course that used a text on par with Krugman and Wells. No specific coursework is required.

    FOOD-GE.2xxx Food Legislation, Regulation and Enforcement

    30 hrs, 3 credits

    This course examines the legal and regulatory frameworks that underlie domestic food policy. Specific areas of emphasis are the jurisdictions of federal and state agencies, the role of the legislative bodies in creating policy, and the role of the judicial system in enforcing policies and regulations.

     

    The Department of Teaching and Learning

    Math

    2/6/13

    MTHED-UE.1122/GE.2122 Professional Seminar for Secondary Mathematics

    45 hrs, 3 credits

    This course complements the second semester of Student Teaching (MTHED-UE.1922), providing students with a professional community of practice for continued learning as their teaching responsibilities increase. The course will focus on specific aspects of planning and intended instruction, enacted teaching, and the impact of teaching. Students will develop practices of deliberate reflection and analysis of their teaching, making explicit connections between their knowledge of theory and practical experiences. There will be an additional focus on pressing local issues in education and education research at the various levels, and their impact on teaching and learning. Students will make sense of these issues and develop informed stances, demonstrating their emerging abilities to do so in connection with their coursework and student teaching experiences in a culminating project.