Faculty

Krishnendu Ray

Associate Professor of Food Studies; Chair of the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health

Krishnendu Ray

Phone: 212-998-5530
Email:

Krishnendu Ray received his Ph.D. in Sociology from SUNY Binghamton in 2001. He holds a master’s degree in Political Science from Delhi University, India. Prior to joining the NYU faculty in 2005, Krishnendu was a faculty member and an Associate Dean for Curriculum Development at The Culinary Institute of America (CIA).

A food studies scholar, he is the author of The Migrant’s Table: Meals and Memories in Bengali-American Households (Temple University, 2004). He has written several book chapters such as "Exotic Restaurants and Expatriate Home Cooking" in David Inglis and Debra Gimlin, eds., The Globalization of Food (Oxford: Berg, 2009), and articles such as “Nation and Cuisine: The Evidence from American Newspapers ca. 1830-2003,” Food & Foodways, 16, 4 (August 2008): 259-297, “Domesticating Cuisine: Food and Aesthetics on American Television,” Gastronomica 7, 1 (Winter 2007): 50-63, “Ethnic Succession and the New American Restaurant Cuisine,” in David Beriss and David Sutton, eds., The Restaurants Book: Ethnographies of Where we Eat (Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2007), and “Why do Ethnic Restaurants Have Terrible Service?” Gastronomica 3, 3 (Summer 2003): 1-7.

A few recent articles are: “Fed by the Other. City Food and Somatic Difference,” Groniek. Eetcultuure (2015) No. 202, pp. 67-84; “The Immigrant Restaurateur and the American City,” Social Research 81, 2 (Summer 2014), pp. 373-396; and “Disreputable Cuisine and Circuits of Masculinity,” Himal South Asia (April 2013) 26, 2, pp. 26-42.

His co-edited book is Curried Cultures: Globalization, Food and South Asia (University of California Press, 2012).

His most recent monograph is The Ethnic Restaurateur (Bloomsbury 2016) = http://www.amazon.com/The-Ethnic-Restaurateur-Krishnendu-Ray/dp/085785836X

He serves on the editorial boards of the journals: Food, Culture & Society; Gastronomica; Contemporary Sociology; and Loukik.

Here are a couple of links to his current work as reported in the media:

On "ethnic" food: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/why-everyone-should-stop-calling-immigrant-food-ethnic/2015/07/20/07927100-266f-11e5-b77f-eb13a215f593_story.html

On Breakfast for Kids: Rise & Shine (in NYT) http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/10/08/magazine/eaters-all-over.html

http://www.npr.org/2014/10/12/355633672/the-new-food-tv-the-era-of-julia-child-packed-its-knives-and-went

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/13/nyregion/thecity/13indi.html?pagewanted=all

http://www.salon.com/2010/02/26/food_network_krishnendu_ray/

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444506004577615281127812456.html

http://www.heritageradionetwork.com/episodes/3590-Taste-Matters-Episode-69-Meals-Memories

Meatpaper (in Washington Post)

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/14/AR2008041402399.html

Christian Science Monitor

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2011/0709/America-s-new-culinary-renaissance

Times of India

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-06-22/food-reviews/28352861_1_food-cooking-krishnendu-ray

Macleans.ca

http://www2.macleans.ca/tag/taste/

The Grid-Canada

http://www.thegridto.com/life/food-drink/amaya-the-curry-kings/

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