Undergraduate Program

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Introduction to Psychology and Its Principles
APSY-UE 0002, 4 points. Spring, Summer.

Introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology, emphasizing both the unity and the diversity of a field that spans major theoretical and research areas, including biological bases of human behavior, learning, development, motivation, and social and abnormal behavior. Opportunities to apply knowledge gained in lectures and readings are available through computer-based demonstrations, in-class experiments, and a required field experience. Links between research and its applications are a recurrent theme.

Community Psychology
APSY-UE 0005, 4 points. Fall, odd-numbered years.

Focuses on understanding people in their social contexts, integrates social action and psychological theory in culturally diverse contexts; introduces community psychology and perspectives on intervention and social change; and considers how contexts are powerful in shaping human behavior.

Developmental Psychology
APSY-UE 0010, 4 points. Fall, Summer.

A comprehensive overview of human development from conception through adolescence. Theories of developmental psychology are related to research findings, and implications are drawn for practical issues.

Social Psychology
APSY-UE 0013, 4 points. Spring.

Social psychology concepts, theories, and research and their relation to educational problems. Concepts treated are attitudes, values, roles, norms, communication, conformity; areas emphasized are group processes and influence, social motivation, prejudice, and authoritarianism.

Personality Theories
APSY-UE 0019, 4 points. Fall.

Consideration of the major theories of personality. The work of various theorists is discussed as it relates to personality development through the life span.

Human Development I
APSY-UE 0020, 4 points. Fall.
Nonmajors only.

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories and basic research of individual growth and development are analyzed and critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative and non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative and non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, and safety. Relations between home, school, and community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, and weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Human Development II: Application for Early Childhood Educators
APSY-UE 0021, 2 points.
Course meets first half of Spring semester.
Prerequisite: APSY-UE 0020.
Nonmajors only.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on early childhood and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include language development, assessment of readiness to learn, separation from the family, peer relationships, aesthetic experiences. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use is also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Human Development II: Application for Childhood Educators
APSY-UE 0022, 2 points.
Course meets second half of Spring semester.
Prerequisite: APSY-UE 0020.
Nonmajors only.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on childhood and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include numeric competence, assessment of reading problems, and gender differences in learning styles. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use is also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation

Human Development II: Early Adolescents
APSY-UE 0023, 2 points.
Course meets first half of Spring semester.
Prerequisite: APSY-UE 0020.
Nonmajors only.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on early through late adolescence and applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include puberty, cross-gender peer relations, preventing risky behaviors, understanding and mastering test-based graduation requirements, transition to work/college, identity development, depression, and aggression.  Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use is also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Human Development II: Adolescents
APSY-UE 0024, 2 points.
Course meets second half of Spring semester.
Prerequisite: APSY-UE 0020.
Nonmajors only.

Further analysis of research findings and theories of human development focusing on adolescence and applied across various institutional Contexts. Important issues include understanding and mastering test-based graduation requirements, transition to work/college, identity development, depression, and aggression. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive and dangerous environments and of alcohol, tobacco, and drug use are also included. Direct application of theory and research is made through field-based inquiry and issue-based investigation.

Research Methods in Applied Psychology I
APSY-UE 0025, 4points. Fall, Spring.
Program/departmental majors only.

Overview of diverse research designs and essential components of research methods, including: formulation of questions and hypotheses, identification of variables and operational definitions, sampling, data collection, and basic statistical and psychometric techniques. Students learn the basic elements and logic of social science research and develop a conceptual understanding of statistical and psychometric techniques.

Counseling Interview
APSY-UE 1012, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Program/departmental majors only.

Experiential course providing an overview of counseling techniques, focusing on the interview as an interactional process.

Educational Psychology
APSY-UE 1014, 4 points. Fall, even-numbered years.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

Overview of major areas in psychology that are critical to education; discussion of concepts and principles fundamental to the learning process and their application to teaching.

Mental Health: Historical, Social, and Political Perspectives
APSY-UE 1031, 4 points. Spring.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

A historical analysis of mental health viewed within a changing social and political context. Special attention given to the changing notions of mental health. Applications to different populations and symptoms and, as a corollary, changing notions of intervention.

Abnormal Psychology
APSY-UE 1038, 4 points. Spring.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

Theories, conceptions, and descriptions of psychopathology with an emphasis on the interrelationship of diagnosis and treatment, theories of symptoms formation, and criteria of normality.

Women and Mental Health: A Life Cycle Perspective
APSY-UE 1041, Fall, odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

Focuses on the psychology of women and their mental health throughout the life cycle. Topics include socialization and gender, feminist theory, and therapy as well as high prevalence disorders of girls and women.

Cultures of Psychology
APSY-UE 1050, 4 points. Spring.
Not open to freshmen or sophomores.
Taken in final Spring semester.
Program/departmental majors only.

Critical examination the ways that culture has shaped major theoretical perspectives in psychology. Alternative perspectives are with regard to race/ethnicity, gender, and social class

Psychosocial Aspects of Sexual Behavior
APSY-UE 1081, 4 points. Fall, even-numbered years.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

Focuses on sexual behavior throughout the life span. The relationship between sexual physiology, attitudes, knowledge, and behavior is examined. Students critically evaluate current social sexual issues using research in psychosexuality, health, culture, and history. The relationship between personal sexual beliefs and professional development is investigated.

Sexual Identities Across the Life Span
APSY-UE 1110, 4points. Spring, even-numbered years.
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology.

Explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identity development as well as stigma management, coming out, multiple oppressions, and community support to combat isolation and minority stress among adolescents, adults, and older adults

Fieldwork in Applied Psychology I
APSY-UE 1123, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Program/departmental majors only.

Introduction to applied research and exploration of the various fields in professional psychology, discussion of ethical and professional standards in the field.

Fieldwork in Applied Psychology II
APSY-UE 1124, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Program/departmental majors only.

A minimum of 8 hours of supervised fieldwork experience per week is required. Students attend supervision seminars and learn to draw connections between their practical experience in the field and psychological theory/research.

Fieldwork in Applied Psychology III
APSY-UE 1125, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Program/departmental majors only.

A minimum of 8 hours of supervised fieldwork experience per week is required. Students attend supervision seminars and explore the connections between their practical experience in the field and psychological theory/research through an independent research project.

Research Methods in Applied Psychology II
APSY-UE 1137,  4 points. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite:  APSY-UE 0025.
Program/departmental majors only.

In-depth look at specific quantitative and qualitative methodologies in the social sciences. Application of methodological understanding gained in previous research methods course, including: developing skills in coding and analyzing data, assessing and improving reliability of measures, and presenting results. Students also learn about special problems of design and measurement when research extends beyond the individual.

Human Learning
APSY-UE 1214, 4 points. Fall
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology

Consideration of major learning theories and related research. Learning is viewed in relation to developmental, social, cognitive, and personality development. Implications for the implied behavioral sciences are discussed.

Social Intervention in Schools and Communities
APSY-UE 1270, 4 points. Fall, even-numbered years
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology

This course will introduce advanced undergraduates to issues in the design, implementation and evaluation of social interventions aimed at addressing social problems such as delinquency, lags in early learning, youth unemployment, poverty and its effects on human development and so on. Students will become familiar with a range of problems and programs, and will study one program depth across the semester with a small team of classmate.

Developmental Psychology Across the Lifespan
APSY-UE 1271  3 points. Fall, Spring.
Nonmajors only
Prerequisite: a course in general psychology

Discussion of human growth across the lifespan; Multiple contexts in which development unfolds are explored and implications for practice are considered.

Adolescent Development
APSY-UE 1272, 4 points. Spring.
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology.

Physical, intellectual, social, and psychosexual of adolescent development. Attention to youth from diverse racial/ethnic and socio-cultural backgrounds. Applications and implications for schooling and for prevention and intervention programs directed at psychosocial problems in adolescence are discussed.

Families, Schools and Child Development
APSY-UE 1278, 4 points. Fall, even-numbered years.
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology.

Examination of the complex relationships between family and school systems, with a special focus on low-income urban communities as they relate to child development. Topics explore the roles culture, immigration, and racial/ethnic diversity play in establishing effective partnerships between families and schools.

Child Development/Social Policy in a Global Society
APSY-UE 1279  4 points. Fall, even years.
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology.

Examination of key issues facing families and governments in raising children for a 21st century global society. Topics might include: economicsand politics affecting child well-being nationally and internationally; child-rearing challenges faced by families and government in low, middle, and highincome nations, public (government) and private (family, business and charitable); the role of scienceand participatory/democratic processes in increasing the effectiveness of public and private investments in children.

Parenting and Culture
APSY-UE 1280 4 points. Spring, odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology.

Examination of parenting views and practice across socio-cultural groups, discussion of similarities and differences in parenting around the globe, how parenting changes over the life course of the child, and how parenting shapes children's development.

Group Dynamics
APSY-UE 1620, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite: an introductory course in developmental psychology.

Students gain understanding of group dynamics through reading, lecture, discussion, and participation in small experiential groups. This course is designed to increase students' understanding of the processes that occur in the development of groups and to enhance their awareness of their interactions with others in groups. The experiential groups are unstructured based on a combination of established models of group dynamics such as T-group and Tavi stock.

Honors Seminar in Applied Psychology
APSY-UE 1995-1996, 4 points. Fall and Spring.
Departmental/Program Seniors only.

A year-long seminar sequence intended only for students in the Honors Program in Applied Psychology. The seminars have three main objectives: (a) to provide a forum where students engage in serious intellectual discussion about the process of research, (b) to provide guidance and structure to students in the process of conducting their independent research studies, and (c) prepare students for presentation of senior thesis and oral examination. All honor students must have a research mentor and approved research project prior to registering for the course.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE COURSES

American Sign Language: Level I
ASL-UE 0091, 4 points. Fall, Spring.

Fundamental principles of ASL grammar and syntax, a basic vocabulary, and conventions of conversational discourse in the deaf community. Emphasis is placed on developing the visual perception skills critical in understanding ASL. Taught in a visual-manual method using no spoken English.

American Sign Language: Level II
ASL-UE 0092, 4 points. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite: ASL-UE 0091 or equivalent.

Continues vocabulary development; introduces the student to intermediate grammatical and conversational techniques, and aspects of deaf culture and history. Expressive skill development emphasizes smoothness and clarity in producing ASL. Receptive skill development emphasizes understanding ASL and finger spelling at a moderate rate. Taught in a visual-manual method using no spoken English.

American Sign Language: Level III
ASL-UE 0093, 4 points. Fall.
Prerequisite: ASL-UE 0092 or equivalent.

Develops intermediate to advanced conversational strategies and distinctive ASL grammatical features for more in-depth discussions. Expressive and receptive skills in extended conversation are emphasized. Taught in a visual-manual method using no spoken English.

American Sign Language: Level IV
ASL-UE 0094, 4 points. Spring.
Prerequisite: ASL-UE 0093 or equivalent.

Develops sophisticated features of ASL. Emphasizes advanced vocabulary and grammar use for descriptive, narrative, and creative/artistic ASL use. Receptive skill development focuses on understanding ASL produced at moderately fast rates. Taught in a visual-manual method using no spoken English.